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Meccano Meccano is a model construction kit invented in 1901 by Frank Hornby comprising re-usable metal strips, plates, angle girders, wheels, axles and gears, with nuts and bolts to connect the pieces. It is a versatile constructional medium enabling the building of a variety of working models and mechanical devices.
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Added: 9th July 2007
Views: 3699
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Posted By: Bamber
Randix 57 Chevy AM FM Radio Cassette Here is a '57 Chevy AM/FM radio/cassette player from the '80's. The front hood opens to insert the cassette and the rear trunk opens to hold the batteries and AC cord. The headlights are the speakers, the windshield is the carrying handle and the antenna is, well, the antenna. The front driving lights light up when the unit is on. The front license plate says "RANDIX '57 Chevy." It was marketed by the RANDIX Co. but was manufactured in China! (It's probably been giving out melamine rays all these years!) I actually bought this at a Toys "R" Us. For those of you who watch reruns of "Home Improvement," you might have noticed one of these sitting on the shelf of the "Tool Time" set. (One of my favorite shows.)
Tags: radio  57  chevy  cassette  classic  car  randix 
Added: 22nd August 2007
Views: 13596
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Umpire Bill Klem 'I never called one wrong!' Bill Klem once immodestly told a reporter. Klem is still widely regarded as baseball's greatest umpire nearly 70 years after he last worked a game. He was a National League arbiter from 1906 through 1941. The innovative Klem (pictured here in 1914) was the first umpire to wear an inside chest protector and the first to use hand signals to keep fans and players informed about his calls. (Klem said, 'The fan in the 25-cent bleacher seat has just as much right to know what I called as the fan in the box seat near home plate.') Klem was so skilled at calling balls and strikes that he only worked behind the plate for a number of years. He worked 18 World Series--a record that will never be broken because MLB now uses a rotation system rather than a merit system to assign umpires to post-season games. Klem was affectionately called 'The Old Arbitrator'--a nickname he adored. The jowly and thick-lipped Klem hated the nickname 'Catfish.' Any player who addressed him that way was quickly ejected. He had a strange relationship with New York Giants' manager John McGraw. Off the field the two were good friends; on the field they feuded bitterly. My favorite Bill Klem story: In 1941, while working the bases, he called a runner out on a tag play at second base. The runner angrily insisted the tag had missed him. Klem informed the irate player, 'I thought you were out.' Then the realization hit him: For the first time in his long career Klem only thought a player was out--he wasn't certain. Klem resigned the next day.
Tags: baseball  umpire  Bill  Klem 
Added: 1st September 2009
Views: 1943
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Baby Face Nelson Lester Gillis, better known as Baby Face Nelson, due to his youthful appearance, was a diminutive 5'4" tall bank robber in the 1930s. Born in Chicago, he began his criminal career stealing cars. He also worked for a time as an enforcer for Al Capone, fought with Capone's ally and outfit member Anthony Accetturo, and received broken bones for his troubles, but he was let go due to being "too violent" for Capone to control. Nelson came to greater prominence in 1934, when he joined the Dillinger gang. He was the antithesis of popular, Robin Hood-like gangsters of the Depression era. Having a psychopathic bent, he didn't hesitate to kill lawmen and innocent bystanders. In contrast though, Nelson was a devoted husband and father who often had his wife and children with him while running from the law. A running machine gun battle with FBI agents took place on November 27, 1934. It started when Nelson, his wife, and John Paul Chase were driving down a road and saw a police car driving the opposite direction. Nelson hated police and federal agents and used a list of license plates he had compiled to actively hunt them at every opportunity. He had recognized the car and decided to chase them. Once they both stopped, the shootout started. Nelson and Chase used their car for cover, however, he charged at the police and opened fire. Even though he was shot 17 times, he was still able to steal the agents car after killing them. Nelson's wife and Chase helped him into the car and with Nelson giving directions, Chase drove away from the scene. Nelson succumbed to his wounds at approximately 8pm that evening and was unceremoniously dumped near a Skokie, Illinois, cemetery. He holds the dubious distinction of being personally responsible for the killing of more federal agents than any other criminal.
Tags: baby  face  nelson  al  capone  american  gangsters 
Added: 27th November 2007
Views: 2702
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Posted By: Babs64
Triple Play From a minor league game in Memphis, one of baseball's rarest feats: A triple play! (Batter strikes out, runner caught stealing at second base, runner caught stealing at the plate.)
Tags: triple  play 
Added: 23rd December 2007
Views: 1591
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ann Sothern On Whats My Line Actress Ann Sothern was the mystery challenger on this episode of What's My Line. Note that her last name is misspelled as 'Southern' on her nameplate. That's a little on the embarrassing side, don't you think?
Tags: Ann  Sothern  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 27th April 2008
Views: 1582
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Posted By: Lava1964
Umpire John McSherry Dies During Game On April 1, 1996, the Cincinnati Reds opened the Major League Baseball season by hosting the Montreal Expos. Seven pitches into the game, 51-year-old umpire John McSherry staggered away from home plate on unsteady legs and collapsed face-first to the ground. He likely died immediately of a massive heart attack, but he was officially pronounced dead an hour later. Another umpire, Tom Hallion, accompanied McSherry to a Cincinnati hospital. The remaining two umpires, after consulting with the Reds and Expos, decided to postpone the game. The decision did not sit well with outspoken Reds' owner Marge Schott who was unhappy about having to issue rainchecks to the 50,000 spectators. (She later sent flowers to McSherry's funeral, but reports claimed they were second-hand flowers she herself had received on Opening Day from a local TV station.) McSherry, who tipped the scales at over 300 pounds, was a stereotypical out-of-shape MLB umpire. Beginning in 1997, MLB insisted on tough new physical fitness standards for its arbiters.
Tags: death  John  McSherry  baseball  umpire 
Added: 26th June 2008
Views: 25016
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1387
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Cloth Inferno  Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire It was the worst factory fire in the history of New York City occurred on March 25, 1911, in the Asch building, where the Triangle Shirtwaist Company occupied the top three of ten floors. Five hundred women, mostly Jewish immigrants between thirteen and twenty-three years old, were employed there. The owners had locked the doors leading to the exits to keep the women at their sewing machines. In less than fifteen minutes, 146 women died. The event galvanized support for additional efforts to be made to increase safety in the workplace. It also garnered support for labor unions in the garment district, and in particular for the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. Much material was provided by several websites, among them are; Photos: Brown Brothers Franklin D.Roosevelt Library Corbis Bettmann The Kheel Center, Catherwood Library, ILR School at Cornell University. Authentic History Center Shorpy.com The Office Museum The Library of COngress Audio National Public Radio Authentic History Center The Kheel Center, Catherwood Library, ILR School at Cornell University However, two of the above mentioned in particular, I want to call attention, the first for an overall exceptionally presented look back at this tragedy and a stunning presentation of the labor movement. Truly a brilliant multi-media presentation. The Triangle Factory Fire -- Presented by The Kheel Center, Catherwood Library, ILR School at Cornell University. http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/trianglefire/ and National Public Radio ... http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st... I can not recommend those two sites too highly. They are top notch.
Tags: Triangle    Shirtwaist    Fire    1911    Unions    Women    Immigrant    Labor    New    York    City    American    History     
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1612
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Pray We Meet Again ... this picture of you I carry in my hand Lets me hear you say You're never far away You'll see me in a dream across a mountain stream And you will hear me say You're never far away" -- Jack White (Never Far Away - Cold Mountain) Video Clips Miramax Films Academy Award Winning Film Cold Mountain Directed by: Anthony Minghella Photos Library of Congress - The Selected Civil War Collection Robert J. Szabo http://www.robertszabo.com/ Jeff Rinehart http://www.flickr.com/people/jeffrine... John L. Smith http://www.smithphotopro.com D. Langley http://www.flickr.com/photos/18367251... Alan Diaz http://flickr.com/people/sunsetsailor/ Cary Jones Crawford http://flickr.com/people/geaux/ Family Old Photos http://www.familyoldphotos.com/civil/ The Phillip Pitzer Collection Lucy Collyar Gordon Collection Bridgeville Veterans of Civil War Music the battle at devil's den Randy Edelman you will be my ain true love Sting performed by Alison Krause without the words Gabriel Yared men of honor Randy Edelman conceived and produced by Dale Caruso
Tags: Civil    War    Vintage    Photos    Wet    Plate    Photography     
Added: 27th September 2008
Views: 1832
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Posted By: dalecaruso

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