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Strolling Bowling I first saw this on a Johnny Carson show in the early '80s. I don't know who invented it but Carson had him on the show with it. When the fellow wound up the bowling ball, it kind of leaned forward and then quickly hopped down the lane and knocked over the pins. I laughed for a good long time after seeing that. Strolling bowling has been re-issued and you can get them once again online. It's great taking it out once in a while to show friends. They get a kick out of watching it hop down the lane. (I don't really "play" with any of the few vintage toys that I own. I don't think that's a good idea with vintage toys that have wind-up springs. I just basically show friends that they still work.)
Tags: strolling  bowling  bowl  ball  game  classic  toy  carson 
Added: 25th August 2007
Views: 2563
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Gorgeous George Pro wrestling's first superstar was George Wagner, better known in the world of grappling thespians as Gorgeous George. His shtick was designed to outrage conservative-minded Americans of the 1950s. George was quick to realize it didn't matter if the patrons bought tickets to cheer him or jeer him--as long as they bought tickets. With Pomp and Circumstance as his entrance music, George would often climb into the ring clad in effeminate robes, his long hair pinned back with gold bobby pins. His valet would spray George's corner with perfume and his opponent with disinfectant. Gorgeous George was a TV icon in the early 1950s. His appearances on the tube often scored higher ratings than Milton Berle. Muhammad Ali cited Gorgeous George as the inspiration for his braggadocio. George retired from wrestling in November 1962. He died of a heart attack just 13 months year later, on December 26, 1963. He was only 48 years old.
Tags: Gorgeous  George 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 1649
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Posted By: Lava1964
Surprise  surprise  surprise Jim Nabors promoted Lt. Gen. John F. Goodman, Commander U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, pins corporal chevrons on Jim Nabors to promote him to Honorary Corporal during a sunset ceremony at Fort DeRussy Waikiki, Hawaii Sept. 25 2007.
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Added: 23rd April 2008
Views: 959
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Posted By: pfc
Paul Orndorff Another treat for Naomi: Wrestler Paul (Mr. Wonderful) Orndorff, at his vicious best, laying a beating on Max Blue around 1986. Orndorff does his full repertoire: He clotheslines his hapless opponent, finishes him off with a pile driver, pins him, and arrogantly tosses sweat on him! You gotta love it!
Tags: Paul  Orndorff  wrestling 
Added: 13th November 2008
Views: 1138
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Posted By: Lava1964
Julie Andrews - A Spoonful of Sugar Julie Andrews, in the title role of Mary Poppins (1964), sings 'A Spoonful of Sugar.' Those were some snazzy special effects for 1964!
Tags: Julie  Andrews  Mary  Poppins  Spoonful  of  Sugar 
Added: 20th May 2009
Views: 878
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Posted By: Lava1964
Diaper Pins Tags: Diaper  Pins  forgotten  items 
Added: 16th April 2014
Views: 998
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Posted By: Cathy
Michael Larson Beats Press Your Luck Press Your Luck was a CBS daytime game show that ran from 1983 to 1986. It was one of the first game shows to use computer technology. The heart of the game revolved around a large computer-generated prize board. There were 18 'randomly arranged' panels. On average, 15 of the 18 panels contained cash or merchandise prizes. The other three were 'whammies.' If a player stopped the rotating board on a whammy, he lost everything. If a player kept accruing spins, he could keep pressing his luck and accumulate as much money and prizes as he dared. Enter Michael Larson, an out-of-work ice cream vendor from Ohio. Using his VCRs, Larson taped numerous episodes of Press Your Luck and screened them in slow motion. Larson's study habits paid huge dividends: He recognized that the board only generated five patterns. If a player was smart enough to recognize the patterns and time his presses accordingly, a small fortune could be amassed. In a May 1984 taping, Larson did just that. To the amazement of host Peter Tomarken, a studio audience, his two opponents, and CBS brass, Larson made 46 consecutive spins without hitting a whammy. (The odds of such a feat, if it were pure luck, are about 5000 to one.) At a time when most game show winners took home less than $10,000, Larson won $104,950 in cash, a sailboat, and trips to Kauai and the Bahamas-- for a total haul valued at $110,237. Larson's run of whammy-free presses took so long that CBS had to air the show over two episodes (on June 8 and 11). At first CBS was reluctant to award Larson his winnings, but they had no legal grounds to withhold Larson's loot. He had beaten the system fairly. Immediately afterward, the Press Your Luck board patterns were increased to 32 making it much less likely that anyone could memorize them. To see a condensed version of Larson in action, check out another post on this website: http://www.yourememberthat.com/media/14367/Michael_Larson_on_Press_Your_Luck/
Tags: Press  Your  Luck  Michael  Larson  game  show 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 1526
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Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Larson on Press Your Luck At Steve's request, here's a compilation of Michael Larson's spins during his remarkable appearance on Press Your Luck in June 1984. Larson had studied numerous hours of Press Your Luck videotapes before becoming a contestant on the show. He figured out there were only five variations of the board and no whammy ever appeared in the fourth spot from the left on the top row nor the middle spot on the right side. Note that Larson hit a whammy on his first 'spin' because he wasn't sure how quickly his stops would register. Once he got the hang of it, though, he was almost unstoppable. CBS was so embarrassed by the situation that the network only aired the Larson episodes once (on June 8 and 11, 1984)--and even refused to let the Game Show Network air them until very recently.
Tags: Michael  Larson  Press  Your  Luck 
Added: 1st December 2010
Views: 1612
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Posted By: Lava1964
Andre Agassi and the Wig Andre Agassi burst upon the pro tennis scene in the late 1980s. His rebel style--plus the fact that he was incredibly talented--won him a lot of youthful fans. A big part of his image was his long locks of hair. To the surprise of many, Agassi revealed in Open, his 2009 autobiography, that his famous hair was actually a wig. Agassi started to lose his hair in 1987 at age 17 and began wearing a hairpiece during his matches. (Agassi's rug disintegrated the night before he was to play in the 1990 French Open final versus Andres Gomez. He repaired it with bobby pins, but was so worried about it coming apart that he lost the match--one he probably should have won.) In 1995, his fiancee Brooke Shields convinced him to go with the sheared look he wore until he retired in 2006 and continues to have to this day.
Tags: Andre  Agassi  tennis  wig 
Added: 5th February 2011
Views: 1060
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Posted By: Lava1964
Phil Esposito Bobby Orr SI Cover Phil Espositio and Bobby Orr, the two kingpins of the great Boston Bruins 1971-72 team, graced the cover of Sports Illustrated during the 1972 Stanley Cup finals, won by the Bruins in six games over the New York Rangers.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  hockey  Esposito  Orr 
Added: 31st May 2011
Views: 1604
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Posted By: Lava1964

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