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The Invaders It all started for an unlucky Architect, David Vincent who was looking for a shortcut that he never found. On that fateful night, he saw something that would change his World forever.....and maybe ours too. The aliens are here and they have these physical differences: No Pulse - Don't Bleed - No Heart Beat - Some Have No Emotion - Pure Oxygen Kills Them - Strange Xray When Taken - Some Have a Deformed Small Finger. Repeated in the UK in the late 70s or early 80s.
Tags: sci-fi  tv 
Added: 3rd August 2007
Views: 2866
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Posted By: Bamber
Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd For a short time during the early 1940s, Lake was considered one of the most reliable box office draws in Hollywood and was also known for her onscreen pairings with actor Alan Ladd. At first, the couple was teamed together merely out of physical necessity: Alan Ladd was just 5 feet 5 inches tall and the only actress then on the Paramount lot short enough to pair with him was Veronica, who stood just 4 feet 11 inches. They made four films together: THIS GUN FOR HIRE, THE GLASS KEY, THE BLUE DAHLIA, and SAIGON. . i love this black and white photo of them!
Tags: veronica  lake  alan  ladd  this  gun  for  hire  the  glass  key  the  blue  dahlia  saigon 
Added: 19th September 2007
Views: 1803
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Posted By: Teresa
Harold Lloyd Safety Last This is the final 10-1/2 minutes of Safety Last!--a silent 1923 Harold Lloyd film. Lloyd, despite his meek appearance, excelled at physical comedy. In this movie Lloyd has to take the place of a friend who was supposed to do a human fly act and climb the outside of the office building where Lloyd works. This is real, folks! There was no trick photography. Lloyd used a stunt double for the long shots in this clip, but all the harrowing closeups were of Lloyd. Lloyd had only a thin mattress on the sidewalk if he happened to fall. Safety last, indeed!
Tags: Harold  Lloyd 
Added: 2nd October 2007
Views: 2727
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2986
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Legend of BatMan begins in Detective Comics It was on May 27, 1939, that the character of Batman made his first appearance in Detective Comics #27. Unlike most superheroes, he does not possess any superpowers; he makes use of intellect, detective skills, science and technology, wealth, physical prowess, and intimidation in his war on crime.
Tags: detective  comics  batman  gotham  city  fictional  characters 
Added: 27th May 2008
Views: 1999
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Posted By: Naomi
An Essential Aid To Woman Power Berlei has been a highly regarded Australian corsetry manufacturer since 1907. This full page ad in "WOMAN", 2 November 1942 depicts an industrial strength corsellette, with some rousing rhetoric such as: "For whether she rears a family or mans a rangefinder, a woman needs the physical support of a good foundation." and "Amongst other munitions of war, Berlei are still making foundations"...
Tags: vintage      ad      corsets      Berlei 
Added: 23rd April 2008
Views: 1669
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Posted By: Teresa
Umpire John McSherry Dies During Game On April 1, 1996, the Cincinnati Reds opened the Major League Baseball season by hosting the Montreal Expos. Seven pitches into the game, 51-year-old umpire John McSherry staggered away from home plate on unsteady legs and collapsed face-first to the ground. He likely died immediately of a massive heart attack, but he was officially pronounced dead an hour later. Another umpire, Tom Hallion, accompanied McSherry to a Cincinnati hospital. The remaining two umpires, after consulting with the Reds and Expos, decided to postpone the game. The decision did not sit well with outspoken Reds' owner Marge Schott who was unhappy about having to issue rainchecks to the 50,000 spectators. (She later sent flowers to McSherry's funeral, but reports claimed they were second-hand flowers she herself had received on Opening Day from a local TV station.) McSherry, who tipped the scales at over 300 pounds, was a stereotypical out-of-shape MLB umpire. Beginning in 1997, MLB insisted on tough new physical fitness standards for its arbiters.
Tags: death  John  McSherry  baseball  umpire 
Added: 26th June 2008
Views: 25386
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jan and Dean  Baby Talk Jan Berry and Dean Torrence first became friends on the football team at L.A.'s University High, but Dean's first success came with Arnie Ginsburg (not the Boston DJ the duo scored a big doo-wop hit as Jan and Arnie with 1958's "Jennie Lee." That song, actually written about a stripper, gained Berry some friends in the business, including Herb Alpert and producer Lou Adler. Together with friend Torrence, who'd just returned from an Army stint, they developed a song called "Baby Talk." It was a smash, but it wasn't until 1963, with the release of the Four Seasons' inspired "Linda," that the Jan and Dean sound began to take shape. After meeting the Beach Boys on the L.A. scene, Jan befriended leader Brian Wilson, and thw two began work on what would become "Surf City." Inspired by the local scene and Wilson's very recent hits, "Surfin'" and "Surfin' Safari" -- and benefiting from Berry's amazing self-taught production skills, it went straight to Number One. The duo of Jan and Dean flourished well into the mid-sixties, weathering even the British Invasion. But on April 12, 1966, Berry's Stingray slammed into a parked gardener's truck (not at the site mentioned in "Dead Man's Curve," despite legend), and Jan entered a decade-long nightmare of physical recovery, drug abuse, and depression. By the mid-Seventies, amazingly, Berry could perform almost at normal, and the duo began an amazing comeback that lasted well into the mid-Eighties. Berry passed away in 2004.
Tags: jan  and  dean  baby  talk  60s  rock  and  roll 
Added: 15th August 2008
Views: 1753
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Posted By: Naomi
Led Zeppelin Performs KASHMIR "Kashmir" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin from their sixth album Physical Graffiti - It was written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant (with contributions from John Bonham) over a period of three years, with the lyrics dating back to 1973.
Tags: Led    Zeppelin        KASHMIR    English    rock    band    Jimmy    Page    Robert    Plant        John    Bonham     
Added: 24th February 2009
Views: 1991
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Posted By: mia_bambina
Jazzy Physical Olivia Newton John How about this jazzy version of Physical? Pretty cool.
Tags: Physical  Olivia  Newton  John  Jazzy 
Added: 4th June 2009
Views: 1181
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Posted By: Carl1957

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