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Dave Hodge Pen-Flipping Incident March 14, 1987 proved to be the final day that Canadian boadcaster Dave Hodge was associated with CBC's Hockey Night In Canada broadcasts. Earlier that same day, CBC had cut away from a crucial match at the Brier (the national men's curling championship--an important event on the sports calendar in Canada) in favor of news programming, irking many Canadians. Later that night on HNIC, CBC did it again--refusing to show the five-minute overtime period between Montreal and Philadelphia to the national audience because it would have preempted the news. As is evident in this clip, Hodge famously couldn't contain his disgust with the network that had employed him for 16 years.
Tags: Dave  Hodge  HNIC  hockey  CBC  television 
Added: 17th April 2013
Views: 2270
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Posted By: Lava1964
Philadelphia Flyers Win 1975 Cup The Philadelphia Flyers won their second consecutive Stanley Cup on May 27, 1975 with a 2-0 victory of the Buffalo Sabres. The win gave the Flyers a six-game victory in the finals. Here are the two goals in the third period that clinched the game for the visitors. As noted at the end of this clip, the Flyers had an all-Canadian roster--the last time such a team won the Stanley Cup. Danny Gallivan and Dick Irvin of Hockey Night in Canada call the game.
Tags: NHL  Stanley  Cup  1975  Phildelphia  Flyers 
Added: 22nd April 2013
Views: 1371
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1988
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Posted By: Lava1964
Great Blizzard of 1888 Snowstorms have paralyzed major cites for as long as North America has had major cities. The most devastating storm was likely the Great Blizzard of 1888 that crippled most of America's major eastern seaboard cities north of Washington, DC and into Canada. What made this blizzard so bad was that it came as a total surprise. In the days leading up to March 12, 1888, there had been unseasonably mild weather. People on the streets of New York City were walking around without overcoats. The "Great White Hurricane," as some folks dubbed it, struck with a fury. Torrential rains began falling, and on March 12 the rain changed to heavy snow, temperatures plunged, and a ferocious wind began. The storm continued unabated for the next 36 hours. Sources vary, but the National Weather Service estimated that 50 inches of snow fell in Connecticut and Massachusetts and 40 inches covered New York and New Jersey. Winds blew up to 48 miles an hour, creating snowdrifts 40 to 50 feet high. The resulting transportation crisis led to the creation of the New York subway, approved in 1894 and begun in 1900. Telegraph and telephone wires snapped, isolating New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington for days. Two hundred ships were grounded, and at least 100 sailors died. Fire stations were immobilized, and property loss from fire alone was estimated at $25 million. Overall, more than 400 storm-related deaths were reported.
Tags: Blizzard  1888 
Added: 24th November 2014
Views: 1209
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Hughes - 1971 NFL Fatality Despite its obvious inherent violence, the National Football League has only ever had one fatality occur on the field since it first began play in 1921--and it occurred from an undiagnosed heart ailment rather than from a bone-jarring collision. On October 24, 1971, Chuck Hughes of the Detroit Lions died during the final two minutes of a home game at Tiger Stadium versus the Chicago Bears. Hughes was born in Pennsylvania in 1943 but grew up in Texas with his 14 siblings. He set several school records for pass receiving at Texas Western University. He had spotty NFL career that began with the Philadelphia Eagles. By 1971 Hughes was used mostly as a special teams player and occasionally at wide receiver. On that fateful day Hughes collapsed while returning to the Lions' huddle following a play that did not involve him. Before his collapse it had been a very uneventful game for Hughes. The Bears held a 28-23 lead in a see-saw battle when the Lions got the ball back for one last drive toward the end zone. With under two minutes to go, Lions' quarterback Greg Landry dropped back and found Hughes on a crossing pattern for a 32-yard gain. He was sandwiched and brought down by two Bear defenders at the Chicago 37-yard line. Unhurt, Hughes popped up immediately and ran back to the Detroit huddle. It was the fifteenth and last catch of Chuck Hughes' career. After two straight incompletions Hughes was walking slowly back to the line of scrimmage when he suddenly grabbed his chest and fell to the ground. Some fans initially thought that Hughes might be faking an injury to give the Lions more time to devise their next play. But everyone in the stadium quickly became aware that something was terribly wrong when they saw Chicago's Dick Butkus waving his arms frantically at the Detroit bench and yelling for help. Team doctors Edward Guise and Richard Thompson rushed onto the field in an attempt to revive the lifeless Hughes. Guise began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while Thompson performed CPR. They were joined by Dr. Eugene Boyle, an anesthesiologist from Gross Pointe, MI, who descended from the stands. It was all to no avail. Hughes was pronounced dead at Henry Ford Hospital. He was 28. The photo of the incident shown here led many people to wrongly believe that Dick Butkus had administered a fatal blow to Hughes. Hughes' cause of death was declared to be a coronary thrombosis, which caused a massive myocardial infarction which cut off the blood flow to his heart. Hughes had had concerns about chest pains weeks before October 24, but a medical examination turned up nothing amiss. Hughes' family eventually sued Henry Ford Hospital for malpractice and was given an out-of-court settlement. Hughes left behind a young widow and a son who was not quite two years old. The Lions have retired Hughes' jersey #85.
Tags: NFL  fatality  Chuck  Hughes  1971 
Added: 23rd November 2015
Views: 2143
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Posted By: Lava1964
Egad! Chess Computer Beats World Champ May 11, 1997 saw one of the most important milestones in human history occur. Strangely, it was attained at the expense of humans. On that date in New York City, Garry Kasparov, the reigning world chess champion and one of the greatest players of all time, lost the deciding game of a six-game series to an IBM computer nicknamed Deep Blue. Kasparov resigned after only 19 moves, giving Deep Blue the match with a record of two wins, one loss, and three draws. The previous year, Kasparov had beaten an inferior version of Deep Blue four games to two in a series played in Philadelphia. To those in the computer industry, the triumph of Deep Blue was a cause for celebration. To many chess followers and ordinary folks, however, the result was ominous: Artificial intelligence had surpassed one of the great minds in human history. Here is a six-minute video about the 1997 event.
Tags: chess  Deep  Blue  computer  Garry  Kasparov 
Added: 20th May 2017
Views: 1033
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Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 919
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Posted By: Lava1964
Peggy Fleming - 1968 US Olympic Trials Nineteen-year-old Peggy Fleming officially earns her spot on the 1968 Olympic figure skating team with her free skate at the US championships at the Spectrum in Philadelphia. (The event doubled as the national Olympic trials.) Note the balletic quality of her performance. A short time later Fleming would win the Olympic gold medal in Grenoble and the world championship a few weeks after that in Geneva.
Tags: figure  skating  Peggy  Fleming 
Added: 18th September 2018
Views: 536
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Posted By: Lava1964

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