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Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1819
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ambrose Small Case 1919 One of the most intriguing missing persons cases is that of Toronto theatre magnate Ambrose J. Small. Small was last seen alive on December 2, 1919 after selling his theatre chain for $1 million--a fantastic sum in those days. He lunched with his wife Theresa at the King Edward Hotel, gave her the check to deposit in their bank account, bought some newspapers from a young street vendor--and vanished forever. Small's disappearance was not reported to the police by his wife for nearly two weeks, leading to speculation that she was involved. Theresa was well known in Toronto for her charitable deeds and was used to Ambrose vanishing without warning for extended periods while away on gambling binges. To spare Theresa embarrassment, the Toronto Police did not formally announce Small was missing until his disappearance was reported in the Toronto Star in January 1920. Small had made his fortune in the theatre business staging low-brow plays often with risque themes. After his disappearance it was discovered that Small had a secret 'love nest' above his Grand Opera House in Toronto where he often 'entertained' chorus girls. Not long after Small vanished, his bookkeeper John Doughty vanished too with $105,000 in bonds taken from Small's safe deposit box. Doughty was later found in Oregon and arrested for theft. He was given a five-year prison sentence. Despite international headlines and a $50,000 reward, no trace of Small was ever found. An elderly Grand Opera House employee claimed to have overheard a violent argument between Small and Doughty on the afternoon Small vanished. The case was officially closed by Toronto police in 1960. Modern investigators recently found a memo written by an investigating officer in 1936, a year after Theresa died. The memo stated there was ample evidence that Ambrose Small had been murdered and that both Theresa Small and John Doughty were guilty of the crime--indicating that the Toronto Police were somehow involved in a major cover-up. The ghost of Ambrose Small is said to haunt one of his old theatres in London, Ontario.
Tags: Ambrose  Small  disappearance 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 2580
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Kiss 1896 Another famous early film was The Kiss (1896) starring May Irwin and John C. Rice. The two were actually performing a scene from a play titled The Widow Jones. Some newspapers of the day thought this 20-second film was too raunchy.
Tags: The  Kiss  May  Irwin  John  Rice 
Added: 24th December 2007
Views: 1399
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy Dont Be A Hero This song, by Bo Donaldson and The Heywoods, was the first 45 RPM record I ever bought! There was another version by Paper Lace that came out around the same time, but I preferred this one.
Tags: Bo  Donaldson  Billy  Dont  Be  A  Hero 
Added: 27th December 2007
Views: 1246
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Rooneys Silent Film Days Mickey Rooney, whose real name was Joseph Yule, began performing at the age of fifteen months as part of his parents' vaudeville routine, wearing a specially tailored tuxedo. His parents separated in 1924. A year later, Mrs Yule moved with Joseph to Hollywood, where she managed a tourist home. Fontaine Fox had placed a newspaper ad for a dark haired child to play the role of "Mickey McGuire" in a series of short silent films, and, lacking the money to have her son's hair dyed, she took him to the audition after applying burnt cork to his scalp. Joseph got the role and became "Mickey" for 78 of the comedies, running from 1927 to 1936, starting with Mickey's Circus, released September 4, 1927. During an interruption in the series in 1932, Mrs. Yule made plans to take her son on a ten week vaudeville tour as "Mickey McGuire", but Fox sued successfully to stop him from using the name. Mrs. Yule suggested the stage name of "Mickey Looney" for her comedian son, which he altered slightly to a less frivolous version. Rooney did other films, including a few more of the McGuire films in his adolescence, and signed with MGM in 1934, where they cast him as the teenage son of a judge in 1937's "A Family Affair", setting Rooney on the way to another successful film series, and the rest is show business history.
Tags: joseph  yule  mickey  rooney  mcquire  silent  films 
Added: 28th December 2007
Views: 2085
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Posted By: Guido
National Police Gazette The National Police Gazette, often simply referred to as the Police Gazette, was an American newspaper founded in 1845 by two journalists, Enoch E. Camp and George Wilkes. The editor and proprietor from 1877 until his death in 1922 was Richard Kyle Fox, an immigrant from Ireland, who turned the publication into something close to a national institution. With its focus on lurid crime, sleaze, vice, and bimbos, it was a periodical commonly found in the nation's pool rooms, barber shops, and taverns. Its sexy illustrations and advertisements sometimes challenged the obscenity laws of the day. What really made the Police Gazette popular was its coverage of sports. No other newspaper in the United States covered sports to its extent--especially prize fighting. Published on pink paper, its coverage of major boxing events was so beloved by the public that often 300,000 issues were printed to satisfy demand following an important bout. The usual run was about 150,000 copies--easily enough to make it a gold mine for Fox. Fox started the tradition of awarding championship belts to boxers. Fox died in 1922 and the Great Depression hurt circulation considerably the following decade. Neverthelees the Police Gazette survived as a periodical in various forms until 1977.
Tags: National  Police  Gazette 
Added: 30th January 2014
Views: 976
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Beatles Paperback Writer Live in Japan Me too cause I'll never play as good as you guys!
Tags: Beatles  Live  Paperback  Writer  Lennon  McCartney  Harrison  Ringo 
Added: 1st January 2008
Views: 2720
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Posted By: tommy7
Featured Member- Lava1964 I was born in a small Canadian city in 1964. I am unmarried. Miss Right has not yet come along. I'm beginning to think she never will. As a kid, I loved acquiring knowledge on a variety of topics, hence my love of trivia. My father got me interested in history by making me watch documentaries when I was eight years old. I am truly grateful he did this. I developed my own passion for sports history. My favorite sports are baseball, boxing, tennis, hockey, football, and soccer. Baseball is far and away my favorite. I live and die with the exploits of the Boston Red Sox. (I was a Red Sox fan long before it became fashionable.) I played fastpitch softball as a kid when that was a popular pastime in Canada. I was a second baseman: Good glove, weak arm, decent contact hitter, not much power. I normally batted second. I have been a softball umpire since 1978. Last time I counted, I had worked over 2,300 games. I've always loved words and the English language. Its possibilities are truly limitless. I modestly say I am a writer of some repute. I began writing pieces for sports encyclopedias at age 19 and really haven't stopped penning sports articles since then. I used to write a weekly sports nostalgia column for a local newspaper. I allegedly had half a million readers at one time. (My column ran for five years before a dim-witted editor took over the sports department and dismissed all the freelance columnists and replaced them with hand-picked toadies. Accordingly, I have put a curse on him and his family. I've had three books on baseball history published. All have received kind reviews. I still write the occasional piece for nostalgia publications. If anyone is really interested in my stuff, I sell collections of my columns on demand. My books are available through mail order from my publisher in North Carolina. I am a tournament Scrabble player and official. I have an expert rating (which I am quite proud of) and I'm usually ranked in the top 40 in Canada. I help run a local club and local tourneys, and, for some reason, I am much in demand to officiate and organize tournaments in many places. Scrabble has allowed me to travel to Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, New Orleans, and this summer...Orlando. It's nice work if you can get it. It must be my aptitude for organization which I acquired from both my parents. Scrabble is quite a diverse and odd subculture. Nevertheless, my best friends are Scrabble players. The game helps me retain what is left of my sanity. Along those same lines, I enjoy all competitive endeavors. I always play to win. This is why I love game shows too, I suppose. Occasionally I do real jobs too. I've been a private tutor since 1994. My students think I'm brilliant. I always try to live up to their expectations. I think I have a good sense of humor. It's a hybrid of American and British mirth. I especially love puns. I am cuddly.
Tags: Featured  Member-  Lava1964 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1764
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Posted By: Steve
Jonathan Papelbon Riverdance This clip always makes me laugh: Jonathan Papelbon of the Boston Red Sox, one of baseball's scariest relief pitchers, celebrates his team's winning the 2007 American League championship with his version of an Irish jig.
Tags: Papelbon  Riverdance 
Added: 11th May 2008
Views: 1745
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ripleys Believe It Or Not Ripley's Believe It Or Not was a regular feature in newspapers for many decades. Its creator, Robert Ripley, hoped to be a professional baseball player but an arm injury ended that dream. Instead, Ripley decided to write about sports. He compiled some odd sports facts and presented them in cartoon form. Ripley intended to call it Champs & Chumps, but settled on Believe It Or Not so he could go beyond sports. His first cartoon panel premiered in the New York Globe on December 19, 1918. At one point, there were 80 million loyal readers of Believe It Or Not in daily newspapers. Much of Ripley's research was done by Norbert Pearlroth. For 52 years, Pearlroth spent 10 hours per day, six days a week in the New York Public Library searching for obscure facts and trivia for Ripley's cartoons!
Tags: Ripleys  Believe  It  Or  Not 
Added: 29th April 2008
Views: 1663
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Posted By: Lava1964

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