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Luz Long Helps Jesse Owens At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens won four gold medals. His toughest struggle was in the long jump. Owens was the overwhelming favorite to win the event, but he fouled on his first two attempts. A third foul would eliminate him. Germany's Luz Long, the European long jump champion, went out of his way to assist the discouraged Owens. Long (who had set a new Olympic record with one of his qualifying jumps) informed Owens that he could easily qualify for the finals by leaping several inches behind the foul line. Owens followed Long's advice--leaping with at least four inches to spare--and qualified for the long jump finals. In the finals, the Olympic record was broken five times. Owens had the longest leap and won the gold medal. Long was the first to congratulate him. Owens and Long became friends. Long was killed serving with the German army in Sicily in 1943. Long was posthumously awarded the Coubertin Medal for Sportsmanship by the IOC. After the war, Long's widow and son continued to regularly correspond with Owens until his death in 1973.
Tags: 1936  Olympics  Luz  Long  Jesse  Owens  long  jump 
Added: 12th July 2013
Views: 554
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Posted By: Lava1964
Frazier vs Zyglewicz  1969 On April 22, 1969, world heavyweight champion Joe Frazier put his title on the line in Houston against hometown favorite Dave (Ziggy) Zyglewicz. Ziggy, a huge underdog, gamely decided to take the fight to Frazier. Ninety-six seconds after the opening bell the contest was over. The vanquished Zyglewicz's wife later told reporters it was akin to "entering a Volkswagen in the Indianapolis 500."
Tags: boxing  Joe  Frazier  Dave  Zyglewicz 
Added: 14th December 2013
Views: 814
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Posted By: Lava1964
AT&T Archives: Design Line Promo (1977) The wonderful thing about this video is how horribly the styles have held up over the years. From the music, to the outfits, to the furniture, it is all a train wreck of style and I love it. I miss 1977.
Tags: 1970  style  furniture  technology  phones  music 
Added: 29th July 2013
Views: 848
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Posted By: Tobro
Controversial SI Cover - 1955 The cover photo on the April 11, 1955 edition of Sports Illustrated seems utterly innocuous today, but it created a great deal of controversy in its day. Hollywood actress Laraine Day is flanked by 1954 National League MVP Willie Mays on the left and her husband, New York Giants' manager Leo Durocher, on the right. The photo set a precedent: It was the first time any American magazine cover featured a white woman with her arm around a black man. SI, which was less than a year old, was amazed by the hate mail it received from its readers in the south. One correspondent said the cover photo was an affront to decent white women everywhere. Another said it was an example of northern liberals constantly reminding the south who the victors were in 1865. The furor died down quickly. More than 50 years later Mays told his biographer that he had no knowledge of any controversy about the SI cover photo.
Tags: SI  cover  baseball  Willie  Mays  Laraine  Day 
Added: 10th August 2013
Views: 1551
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
ESPN Reveals 1973 King-Riggs Match was Fixed Confirming many people's suspicions that have lingered for 40 years, an expose on ESPN.com this week showed strong evidence that Bobby Riggs deliberately lost his famous Battle of the Sexes tennis match to Billie Jean King as a way to erase his gambling debts with organized crime. The 55-year-old Riggs had throttled Margaret Court, the world's top female tennis player, in a televised match on Mother's Day 1973 6-2, 6-1. Four months later King, the defending Wimbledon champion, beat Riggs in surprisingly easy fashion 6-4, 6-3, 6-3 before a big TV audience and more than 30,000 fans at the Houston Astrodome--despite being a 5-2 underdog at Las Vegas sports books. When one views the Riggs-King match with a critical eye, Riggs played passively and listlessly--not remotely the same way he played against Court in May. Riggs' shots were soft and usually placed directly at King. Riggs, the 1939 men's Wimbledon champion, whose serve was impeccably accurate, also double-faulted at four critical points in the match--including set point in the first set. Several all-time male tennis legends, including Don Budge who achieved the Grand Slam in 1938, expressed doubts about the honesty of the match, but their doubts were dismissed as wounded male pride at the time. According to the ESPN story, Riggs was anywhere from $100,000 to $500,000 in debt to the mob. A witness, now 79, who was close to the mob, told ESPN he had overheard the discussions regarding the fix. Riggs came up with a two-part plan: In exchange for having his gambling debts expunged, Riggs would goad Court into a TV match with sexist comments knowing full well he could beat her soundly. He would then purposely lose to King as a way for the mob to make a killing in wagers on King at long odds. Riggs died in 1995 at age 77. King was among the last people to speak to him.
Tags: tennis  Bobby  Riggs  Billie  Jean  King  fix 
Added: 28th August 2013
Views: 627
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Posted By: Lava1964
Short Life of Patrick Kennedy For two days in August 1963, the attention and concern of many Americans was focused on the newborn son of president John F. Kennedy, Patrick. Patrick Bouvier Kennedy was born by emergency caesarean section five-and-a-half weeks early at the Otis Air Force Base Hospital in Bourne, Massachusetts. His birth weight of 4 pounds 10-1/2 ounces medically classified him as premature. Immediately after Patrick's birth, he was transferred to Boston Children's Hospital where he died two days later of hyaline membrane disease, following treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. His obituary in The New York Times stated that, at that time, all that could be done for a victim of hyaline membrane disease "is to monitor the infant's blood chemistry and to try to keep it near normal levels." Hyaline membrane disease, now more commonly called respiratory distress syndrome, helped spark new public awareness of the disease and further research. In 2004, the disease had an overall mortality of less than 15%—lower among mildly to moderately premature infants, such as with the Kennedys' infant son. Had he been born 50 years later in August 2013, his odds of survival would have been 95%. Treatment modalities are now widely available in developed countries, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), pulmonary surfactant replacement, and improved respirator technology, that either did not exist or were unavailable in 1963.
Tags: Kennedy  baby  death   
Added: 1st September 2013
Views: 549
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lux ad on old maids Tags: Lux  ad  on  old  maids  over  30  old  women   
Added: 3rd September 2013
Views: 653
Rating:
Posted By: pfc
Mad Cartoonist Don Martin Don Martin was a feature cartoonist for Mad Magazine from 1956 to 1988. Martin's immediately recognizable drawing style (which featured characters with bulbous noses, enormous chins, and hinged feet) was loose, rounded and filled with broad slapstick. His inspirations, plots and themes were often bizarre and bordered on the berserk. In his earliest years with Mad, Martin used a more jagged, scratchy line. His style evolved, settling into its familiar form by 1964. It was typified by a sameness in the appearance of the characters. (A strip's punchline often was emphasized by a character's deadpan take with eyes half open and the mouth absent or in a tight, small circle of steadfast perplexity.) Martin punctuated his work with his own unique onomatopoetic sound effects, such as "BREEDEET BREEDEET" for a croaking frog, "PLORTCH" for a knight being stabbed by a sword, or "FAGROON klubble klubble" for a collapsing building. (Martin's dedication to onomatopoeia was such that he owned a vanity license plate which read "SHTOINK," patterned after the style of his famed sound effects.) Martin left Mad in 1988 after a dispute over royalties from reprints of his older cartoons. He worked for rival magazine Cracked for six years. A typical Don Martin comic strip featured far-fetched humor. One example featured a man who was run over by a steamroller being saved by a concerned passerby who folds the victim into a paper airplane and throws him in the direction of the nearest hospital. Martin died of cancer in 2000 at the age of 68.
Tags: Don  Martin  cartoonist  Mad  magazine 
Added: 9th September 2013
Views: 1979
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Posted By: Lava1964
David Clyde - Pitching Bust David Clyde was perhaps the biggest disappointment in baseball history--which is saying quite a bit! The left-handed pitcher played five MLB seasons with the Texas Rangers (1973–1975) and Cleveland Indians (1978–1979). He is noted for his once promising baseball career which ended at age 26 because of arm and shoulder injuries. Hyped as the next Sandy Koufax, Clyde had a stellar amateur career at Westchester High School in Houston, TX where he compiled a minuscule 0.18 ERA in 148 innings. He was drafted by the Texas Rangers with the first overall pick in the 1973 MLB draft. As a way to boost poor attendance in Texas, Clyde was to pitch his first two professional games with the Rangers before moving down to the minor leagues for experience. He made his major league debut at age 18 on June 27, 1973 versus the Minnesota Twins--just 20 days after pitching his last high school game. Before a sellout crowd, Clyde walked the first two Twins he faced and then struck out the next three. He pitched five innings, allowed one hit, and got credit for the Rangers' 4-3 win. The strong attendance caused Rangers' owner Bob Short to reconsider his plans for Clyde. He decided to keep Clyde on the Rangers' roster as a much-needed gate attraction. In 1973 Clyde compiled a poor 5.01 earned run average in 18 starts. Worse, Clyde received very little mentorship. He fell into a clique of Ranger players who were known for their undisciplined behavior away from the diamond. Journalists rightly criticized the Rangers for promoting Clyde too soon. After an uneventful 1974 campaign, he developed shoulder trouble and was sent down to the minor leagues in 1975, where Clyde pitched three seasons. He was traded to the Cleveland Indians in 1978, and played two seasons before being demoted. Clyde attempted to make a comeback with the Houston Astros in 1981 but was unsuccessful. He fell a few innings short of qualifying for a MLB pension.
Tags: David  Clyde  MLB  pitcher 
Added: 16th September 2013
Views: 506
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lucille Ball and Paula Stewart - Hey Look Me Over Tags: Lucille  Ball  and  Paula  Stewart  -  Hey  Look  Me  Over  Ed  Sullivan  Show  Wildcats 
Added: 5th October 2013
Views: 872
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Posted By: pfc

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