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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes don't Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe make lovely brides?
Tags: gentlemen  prefer  blondes  Jane  Russell    Marilyn  Monroe  diamonds  are  a  girls  best  friend  dorothy  miss  lorelei  lee  tommy  noonan 
Added: 25th September 2007
Views: 1627
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
High Noon intro The opening 2-1/2 minutes of High Noon (1952)--including the Oscar-winning theme song composed by Dimitri Tiomkin. Terrific adult western shot in real time about a marshal who postpones his retirement to defend an ungrateful town from a vengeful bunch of killers.
Tags: High  Noon 
Added: 3rd October 2007
Views: 1785
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
  Frankie Laine Sings Jezebel Frankie was a typical Sicilian kid, born, Francesco Paolo LoVecchio, in the heart of Chicago's Little Italy on March 30, 1913, where his father worked at one time as the personal barber for gangster Al Capone. His family had several Mafia connections, and when Frankie was young, he was living with his grandfather when the latter was hit by some members of a rival faction. He began as a marathon dancer, but soon realized that he wanted to make singing his life's career. He became one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century, often billed as America's Number One Song Stylist, his other nicknames included Mr. Rhythm, Old Leather Lungs, and Old Man Jazz. His hits included "That's My Desire", "That Lucky Old Sun," "Mule Train", "Cry of the Wild Goose", "Jezebel," "High Noon", "I Believe", "Hey Joe!", "The Kid's Last Fight", "Cool Water", "Moonlight Gambler", "Love is a Golden Ring", "Rawhide", and "Lord, You Gave Me a Mountain". His career as an entertainer spanned approximately 75 years. Frankie passed away on February 6, of this year, due to heart failure after having survived two bypass surgeries several years earlier.
Tags: frankie  laine  jezebel  italian  singers 
Added: 4th October 2007
Views: 2264
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Posted By: Sophia
Sunny Afternoon The Kinks
Tags: Gooden 
Added: 6th October 2007
Views: 2205
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
LARRY TRIVIA 10 17 07 How much attention do you pay to the films you watch? IN THE 1952 WESTERN FILM HIGH NOON, STARRING GARY COOPER, WHAT WAS THE MOST UNUSUAL SCENE?
Tags: high  noon  gary  cooper  western  films 
Added: 17th October 2007
Views: 1384
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Fond Memories from Heinz I just thought this was a really nice ad that fits right in with our site.
Tags: picnic    family    kids  children  fun  afternoons  heinz     
Added: 21st October 2007
Views: 1088
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 212
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gordon Sinclair The Americans On June 5, 1973, Canadian radio personality Gordon Sinclair delivered this stirring, pro-American editorial. He had written it in 20 minutes. Simply titled The Americans, it followed his noontime newscast on CFRB in Toronto. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Radio stations in Buffalo, New York asked permission to play the broadcast, which was granted. Soon afterwards it swept across the United States. Sinclair's verbatim editorial was made into this recording (with the Battle Hymn of the Republic playing in the background). It reached #23 on the Billboard charts, making the 73-year-old Sinclair the oldest living person to have a Billboard top 40 hit! At Sinclair's request, the proceeds from its sales went entirely to the American Red Cross. When President Ronald Reagan made his first official visit to Canada in 1981, he asked to meet Sinclair. Reagan told Sinclair that his editorial always cheered him up when he was feeling down.
Tags: Gordon  Sinclair  The  Americans 
Added: 24th November 2007
Views: 9286
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Posted By: Lava1964
Sit A Spell   1939 chillin' at the Country Store on a Sunday afternoon!! (check out the kerosene pump on the right and the gasoline pump on the left) . . . .
Tags: vintage      photo      country      store 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1278
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Ambrose Small Case 1919 One of the most intriguing missing persons cases is that of Toronto theatre magnate Ambrose J. Small. Small was last seen alive on December 2, 1919 after selling his theatre chain for $1 million--a fantastic sum in those days. He lunched with his wife Theresa at the King Edward Hotel, gave her the check to deposit in their bank account, bought some newspapers from a young street vendor--and vanished forever. Small's disappearance was not reported to the police by his wife for nearly two weeks, leading to speculation that she was involved. Theresa was well known in Toronto for her charitable deeds and was used to Ambrose vanishing without warning for extended periods while away on gambling binges. To spare Theresa embarrassment, the Toronto Police did not formally announce Small was missing until his disappearance was reported in the Toronto Star in January 1920. Small had made his fortune in the theatre business staging low-brow plays often with risque themes. After his disappearance it was discovered that Small had a secret 'love nest' above his Grand Opera House in Toronto where he often 'entertained' chorus girls. Not long after Small vanished, his bookkeeper John Doughty vanished too with $105,000 in bonds taken from Small's safe deposit box. Doughty was later found in Oregon and arrested for theft. He was given a five-year prison sentence. Despite international headlines and a $50,000 reward, no trace of Small was ever found. An elderly Grand Opera House employee claimed to have overheard a violent argument between Small and Doughty on the afternoon Small vanished. The case was officially closed by Toronto police in 1960. Modern investigators recently found a memo written by an investigating officer in 1936, a year after Theresa died. The memo stated there was ample evidence that Ambrose Small had been murdered and that both Theresa Small and John Doughty were guilty of the crime--indicating that the Toronto Police were somehow involved in a major cover-up. The ghost of Ambrose Small is said to haunt one of his old theatres in London, Ontario.
Tags: Ambrose  Small  disappearance 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 1989
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Posted By: Lava1964

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