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Springhill Mining Disaster 1958 One of the first major 'ongoing' news stories to be covered live on television was the coal mining disaster in Springhill, Nova Scotia, Canada on October 23, 1958. That night 174 miners were trapped 13,000 feet below ground when a 'bump' caused a huge section of the mine to collapse. It was the third major disaster at the mine since 1891. Exactly 100 miners were rescued; some were trapped for five days before being saved. The bodies of the other 74 were all eventually recovered. Because of the heat at that depth, many of the corpses had badly decomposed by the time they were found. The mine never reopened.
Tags: Springhill  mine  disaster 
Added: 13th June 2009
Views: 3431
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bill Barilko Mystery One of the oddest sports stories ever is the disappearance of Bill Barilko of the Toronto Maple Leafs. In the spring of 1951, Barilko became a Leafs hero when he scored the Stanley Cup-winning goal against the Montreal Canadiens. That summer, Barilko and a dentist friend, Dr. Henry Hudson, flew to northern Quebec in the dentist's private plane to do some fishing on the Seal River. For their return home, they loaded the plane's pontoons with 120 pounds of fish they had caught, took off for southern Ontario--and were not seen alive again. The RCMP began a huge search for the missing men. (Some thought the police's interest in the case was far beyond what might be expected.) Nearly eleven years passed before the plane's wreckage was discovered in a densely wooded area of northern Ontario. The skeletal remains of Barilko and Hudson were found in the plane. Oddly enough, the plane was facing the opposite direction one would expect--and the 120 pounds of fish were not found in the pontoons. One persistent and fascinating rumor insists that Barilko, who hailed from a gold-mining community, was using his dentist friend as a mule to move a significant quantity of gold nuggets and dust he had illegally obtained from the mine. (Since dentists need gold for fillings, they have connections with gold suppliers.) The plane's pontoons had mysteriously been sliced open.
Tags: Bill  Barilko  mystery  hockey 
Added: 30th May 2008
Views: 1946
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Posted By: Lava1964
Paul McCartney Death Story Remember this balderdash? The strange claim first appeared in Drake University's student newspaper in September 1969. It gathered momentum a month later when Russ Gibb, a Detroit-area deejay, broadcast that Paul McCartney had died in a November 1966 car mishap and had been secretly replaced in the Beatles by the winner of a lookalike contest. The supposed clues to Paul's untimely death could be found by playing Beatles' records backwards, by looking at imagery on album covers, and by examining various song lyrics. Yeah, right.
Tags: Paul  McCartney  dead 
Added: 28th June 2008
Views: 1299
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tales of Tomorrow This is a clip from the 1950's TV series, Tales Of Tomorrow, a forerunner of Outer Limits and TZ. In this clip, Leslie Nielsen and Brian Keith have landed on the planet Mars (and is that beer they're drinking?) A mining company has sent them there to find uranium, but did they find more than they counted on? oh, the drama...
Tags: Tales  of  Tomorrow  science  fiction  television  leslie  nielsen  brian  keith  drama     
Added: 28th July 2008
Views: 1370
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Posted By: Naomi
Can You Hear the Bitter Cry of Children They were called Drivers, Greasers, Oilers, Pushers, Breakers, and Trappers. They salvaged coal from the slag heap, for10 cents for each hundred-pound sack or two dollars a ton. Boys as young as 8, working ten-hour days.. The Photography of Ben Shahn and Louis Wickes Hine Library of Congress shorpy.com http://shorpy.com/ Music: Pete Seeger and The Civil War Soundtrack, Ken Burns producer conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso
Tags: Coal    Mining    Childern     
Added: 26th September 2008
Views: 1924
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Swastika Name Controversy There is a Canadian town (located in northern Ontario) that bears the odd name of Swastika. Founded in 1904, it began as a mining community. No one is quite sure about the origin of the town's name. When Naziism was on the rise in the 1930s, the government of Ontario forced the 600 people of Swastika to accept Winston as a new name for the town. The people rebelled, tore down the Winston sign on the highway, and replaced it with another Swistika sign that carried the message: 'To hell with Hitler. We had the name first.'
Tags: Swastika  Ontario  town 
Added: 13th February 2009
Views: 1258
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Posted By: Lava1964
Odd Couple - Ticket Scalping Trial There were several episodes of The Odd Couple that centered around court cases. They were all hilarious. Perhaps the best remembered was the twosome's ticket scalping trial (from the episode titled My Strife in Court) where Felix acts as their defense attorney. Here's a clip of Felix cross-examining his accuser.
Tags: Odd  Couple  sitcom  ticket  scalping  assume 
Added: 8th April 2014
Views: 1586
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mercury Mining and Production Tags: mining  Mercury  quick  silver  poisonious   
Added: 31st August 2009
Views: 1520
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Offensive Words Expunged From Scrabble Dictionary In 1993, Judith Grad, a kitchen-table Scrabble enthusiast was horrified to discover that the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary (OSPD) contained racial, religious, and ethnic slurs along with common vulgarities and obscenities. She wrote letters of complaint to Hasbro (the company that owns Scrabble) and Merriam-Webster, the publisher of OSPD. The general response was that although some words were certainly offensive, they were still words that could be found in any collegiate-level dictionary. Moreover, their meanings were irrelevant to the game. Unsatisfied, Grad contacted the Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai Brith, the NAACP, and the Zionist Organization of America. That, combined with a letter-writing campaign organized by the National Council of Jewish Women, brought the 'offensive word issue' some mainstream publicity. Without consulting Merriam-Webster or the National Scrabble Association (NSA), Hasbro chairman Alan Hassenfeld, in a knee-jerk reaction, announced that '50 to 100 words' would be expunged when the next edition of OSPD was published. Predictably, serious tournament Scrabble players went nuts, accusing Hasbro of caving into censorship, political correctness and the 'language police.' A petition bearing the signatures of more than 800 tournament players was presented to Hasbro demanding Hassenfeld's decision be reversed. At the 1994 U.S. National Scrabble Championship in Los Angeles, an angry mob of more than 200 players vociferously declared their opposition to any expurgation and vowed to quit the game or even sue the NSA if any words were removed from the lists because of political correctness. An acceptable compromise was reached: Starting in 1996 a separate Official Word List (OWL)--without definitions--would be made available to tournament players through the NSA, while a sanitized OSPD would be sold to the general public. OSPD would contain no offensive words and a not-too-prominent disclaimer that it was only 'official' for school and recreational play. Since offensiveness is highly subjective, determining the words that were eventually expunged from OSPD was itself controversial. Brace yourself: Among the 303 'naughty' words you'll no longer see in OSPD are FATSO, LIBBERS, REDSKIN, GRINGO, BAZOOMS, COMSYMP, POONTANG, WETBACK, PAPIST, BADASS, REDNECK, BULLDYKE and STIFFIE.
Tags: Scrabble  words  censorship  political  correctness 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 3485
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Posted By: Lava1964
Weightlifter Vasili Alexeyev 1942-2011 It has been reported that Vasili Alexeyev, the Soviet weightlifter who utterly dominated the super-heavyweight division of the sport during most of the 1970s, died in Germany on November 25, 2011 at the age of 69. He was at a clinic seeking treatment for a serious heart ailment. Alexeyev easily won gold medals at both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics and won eight straight world championships from 1970 to 1977. (The Olympics doubled as weightlifting's world championships in 1972 and 1976.) Alexeyev, who set 80 world records in his career, was listed as a "mining engineer" by Soviet sports authorities. Alexeyev was the first man to lift 500 pounds in competition. But his fans were fickle: When the 38-year-old Alexeyev failed to make any of his three lifts at the 1980 Moscow Olympics, he was jeered off the stage. In a 1971 interview, the affable Alexeyev said he liked to spend his spare time reading Agatha Christie mystery novels.
Tags: weightlifting  Vasili  Alexeyev 
Added: 28th November 2011
Views: 4744
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Posted By: Lava1964

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