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The Man Show One of the more over-the-top TV shows to hit the airwaves in recent years was The Man Show. From 1999 to 2004 it was a half-hour program that aired on Comedy Central. It was created in 1999 by its two original co-hosts, Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla. Kimmel had earlier gained a following hosting the offbeat game show Win Ben Stein's Money on the same cable network. The Man Show overtly and proudly celebrated the stereotypical loutish male perspective in a sexually charged, humorous light. The show consisted of a variety of pre-recorded comedy sketches and live in-studio events, usually requiring audience participation. The show tried to touch on all the aspects of alpha-maleness: excessive drinking, the sexualization of women, obsession with sports, and general lack of refinement. Typical of the fare on The Man Show was a recurring segment called Wheel of Destiny in which a lucky participant selected from the studio audience could win one of four desirable prizes (such as an erotic massage from two female porn stars or $10 in cash) or one of four undesirable prizes (such as "Adam pees on your wallet" or having a sumo wrestler sit on your face). Each show routinely ended with a slow-motion video montage of comely females in lingerie jumping on trampolines. Shakespeare it wasn't--but it had its moments. Kimmel and Carolla left The Man Show in 2003. With new co-hosts Joe Rogan and Doug Stanhouse taking over the helm, the show lost much of its luster and lasted just one more season before being cancelled. A total of 114 episodes were made in five seasons. The Man Show's first four seasons are available on DVD.
Tags: comedy  Man  Show  Jimmy  Kimmel  Adam  Carolla 
Added: 17th June 2012
Views: 5280
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stockwell Day-Doris Day Petition One of Canada's most popular homegrown TV shows is a CBC comedy program called This Hour Has 22 Minutes. One of the show's most fondly remembered moments was the "Stockwell Day Petition." The sketch aired during the 2000 Canadian federal election campaign, and consisted of a staged rant by host Rick Mercer. During that particular federal election, Stockwell Day, who was then the leader of the Canadian Alliance Party, proposed a mechanism to call for a referendum. Day proposed that a petition on ANY subject which gathered at least 350,000 signatures from voting-age citizens (about 3% of Canada's eligible voters) would automatically trigger a national referendum. Mercer decided to put Day's poorly thought out idea to the test: His "rant" asked viewers to log on to the show's website and sign an online petition demanding the Alliance Party leader change his first name to Doris--thus making him Doris Day. The show's producers claimed to have obtained in excess of 1.2 million online signatures--although there was no way of telling how many of those who signed the online petition were actually eligible voters. The stunt got huge publicity in Canada and even made some international news programs. The petition had no effect on Alliance Party policy, though, despite clearly demonstrating how absurd Day's proposal was. Day did, however, take the petition in stride. When asked about it by a reporter, Day gave a very appropriate response: "Que será, será!"
Tags: Canada  CBC  Stockwell  Day  petition 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 2995
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Richards 1956-1994 Bob Richards was born as Robert L. Schwartz, He was the Chief Meteorologist at KSDK in 1983 to 1994, He grew up in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Before KSDK he was a Meteorologist at The Weather Channel through 1982 to 1983, also earned the Seal Of Apporval from the American Meteorological Society, But his tormented and embarrassment of his affair becoming public. On March 23rd, 1994, Richards took off his private plane from Spirit of St. Louis Airport and crash his plane to the ground, and he was killed, He committed suicide.
Tags: 1994  Bob  Richards  Meteorologist  KSDK  St  Louis  Missouri  1983  American  Meteorological  Society  Chief 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 4443
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Caldor Department Store Commercial Tags: Caldor  Department  Store  Commercial  1990 
Added: 12th December 2014
Views: 1155
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Posted By: Cathy
Dondi - Comic Strip 1955-1986 Dondi was a daily comic strip that ran for more than 30 years. It was about a large-eyed war orphan. Created by Gus Edson and Irwin Hasen, at its peak of popularity it ran in more than 100 newspapers. The first installment ran on September 25, 1955. The final Dondi comic strip appeared on June 8, 1986. Dondi's original backstory describes him as a five-year-old World War II orphan of Italian descent. The boy had no memory of his parents or his name, so when a pretty Red Cross worker said he was "a dandy boy," he thought she was naming him Dondi. Two American soldiers who spoke no Italian, Ted Wills and Whitey McGowan, found the child wandering through a war-torn village. The soldiers brought the child back to the United States and Ted eventually became his adoptive father.
Tags: Dondi  comic  strip  newspapers  serial 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 11689
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 1255
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1969
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Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3464
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Don Grady 1944-2012 I'm surprised that no one had posted anything about the passing of Don Grady. Grady was born Don Louis Agrati on June 8, 1944. He was one of the original Mousketeers from the Mickey Mouse Club. However, Grady was most famous for playing middle son Robbie Douglas on the long-running sitcom My Three Sons from 1960 to 1972. Eldest son Mike, played by Tim Considine, left the cast in 1965. (The storyline had him getting married and moving away.) Thus Robbie assumed the new dynamic of being the oldest brother to Chip and Ernie (who was newly adopted). Grady was a musician whose band, The Greefs, made a handful of appearances on the show. Grady later composed musical arrangements, including the theme for The Phil Donahue Show. He died of bone cancer at age 68 on Wednesday, June 27, 2012.
Tags: Don  Grady  obituary 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 1868
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Oliver Sipple - The Man Who Saved Gerald Ford On September 22, 1975, 33-year-old Oliver Sipple (the man with the sideburns in the left of the photo) was walking past the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco where President Gerald Ford was scheduled to speak. As Sipple moved forward to better hear Ford's speech, he noticed a woman standing next to him (later identified as Sara Jane Moore) reach into her raincoat and pull out a revolver. Sipple yelled, "Gun!" and instinctively grabbed for her arm and deflected it as she pulled the trigger. The bullet, intended for the president who was just 40 feet away, ricocheted off a wall and slightly wounded another bystander. Sipple, a decorated Vietnam vet, tackled Moore, prevented her from shooting again, and handed her over to the Secret Service. Oliver Sipple now became a reluctant celebrity. He was immediately hailed in the national press and received thousands of letters praising his heroics. However, President Ford only sent him a short note and avoided a personal meeting. News organizations wondered why the White House was avoiding Sipple. Although he was openly gay, Sipple’s sexual orientation was a secret from his family and employers. Accordingly, he asked the press to keep his sexuality off the record. However, news organizations refused to comply. The gay community saw the situation as a great opportunity. While discussing whether or not Sipple’s sexuality ought to be disclosed, prominent gay San Francisco's councilman Harvey Milk noted: “For once we can show that gays do heroic things, not just all that caca about molesting children and hanging out in bathrooms.” Milk further suggested that Sipple’s sexual orientation was the reason he received only a note from Ford rather than a formal invitation to the White House. Herb Caen, a columnist at The San Francisco Chronicle, outed Sipple as gay. The Chicago Sun-Times called him a ‘Homosexual Hero’; The Denver Post used the more pithy term ‘Gay Vet’. In Detroit, Sipple’s staunch Baptist family became the subject of ridicule and abuse by friends and neighbors. His mother refused to talk to him. When she died in 1979, his father told him not to attend the funeral. Sipple filed a $15-million invasion of privacy suit against seven newspapers and various publishers, but after a long and bitter process, the courts held that Sipple himself had become news, and that his sexual orientation was part of the story. Oliver Sipple sank into a downward spiral of depression, alcoholism, obesity and drug abuse. By the time he was found dead with an empty bottle of bourbon in 1989, Oliver Sipple was already a forgotten footnote to ethics and freedom of press. His apartment was littered with press clippings about that fateful day in 1975 when he saved a man’s life and subsequently ruined his own.
Tags: Oliver  Sipple  gay  assassination  hero  Ford 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 2305
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Posted By: Lava1964

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