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1965 - Construction of the St. Louis Arch Over 40 years ago back in 1965, The Arch was built in 1963 it completed the St. Louis Arch in 1966 and that was how a landmark begin
Tags: St  Louis  Arch  1965  Jefferson  National  Expansion  Memorial 
Added: 28th May 2012
Views: 4296
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Babe Ruth  - Final Game With Yankees This photo issued by Acme Newspictures on September 30, 1934, shows the immortal Babe Ruth exiting Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. following the New York Yankees' final game of the 1934 season. Washington won 5-3 in a game that took just 80 minutes to play. Ruth went 0-for-3 at the plate but did score a run before being replaced by Myril Hoag in right field. Detroit won the American League pennant in 1934, so there would be no World Series farewell for Ruth. Ruth was honored at Griffith Stadium earlier that day with gifts and he announced his retirement from baseball before a crowd of about 15,000. (Before the 1935 season Ruth was convinced to return to the game by Boston Braves owner Judge Emil Fuchs. He only played a month before quitting the last-place Braves.) Ruth's departure from the Yankees was bitter and messy. His playing skills were obviously diminishing and Lou Gehrig was now the team's star attraction. After years of unsuccessfully lobbying for the managerial position with Yankees' owner Jacob Ruppert, Ruth had had enough. This photo shows a dejected Ruth, with his head down, making his exit outside the ballpark. A boy is shown trying to chase down the Babe for an autograph, but Ruth (who usually accommodated everyone) was in a foul mood and had no time to pen the lad's baseball. A policeman is gesturing with his hands to the kid with a "not-today-son" motion. Six days earlier, on Monday, September 24, 1934, Ruth made his final Yankee Stadium appearance as a player in New York's 5-0 loss to the Boston Red Sox. He was pulled early in the game from his right feld position. There were no special ceremonies to mark the occasion. Fewer than 2,000 fans attended the game.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  photo 
Added: 22nd May 2012
Views: 3339
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Posted By: Lava1964
Terry Felton - Dubious Baseball Records Terry Lane Felton (born October 29, 1957 in Texarkana, AK) was a not very successful pitcher for the Minnesota Twins from 1979 to 1982. Felton holds two of the most dubious pitching records in Major League Baseball history: the most consecutive losses to start a career and most career losses without ever being credited with a victory. He was released by the Twins after the 1982 season in which he went 0-13. In that 1982 season Felton was used as a starter in six games and a closer in 20 others. As a reliever he gave up three walkoff homers. When Felton's 0-13 mark from 1982 is added to his 0-3 record coming into that season, he has a combined lifetime record of 0-16. Felton finished with a 5.53 career ERA. However his team did win six of the 55 games in which he played. Oddly enough, Tony Armas, who won two-thirds of American League triple crown in 1984, went hitless in the nine times he faced Felton.
Tags: baseball  Terry  Felton  losses 
Added: 26th May 2012
Views: 1468
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Tyrone Power - 1958 Tyrone Power was one of Hollywood's most popular actors from his debut in 1936 until the time of his untimely death in 1958. In 1957, the twice-divorced Power met Deborah Ann Montgomery Minardos. They were married on May 7, 1958, just after Power's 44th birthday. She became pregnant soon afterward. In September 1958, Power and his wife travelled to Madrid and Valdespartera, Spain to film Solomon and Sheba under the direction of King Vidor. Deborah Ann was worried about Tyrone's health and asked him to slow down, but he pushed ahead with the movie. He had filmed about 75 percent of his scenes when he was stricken with a massive heart attack while he was filming a strenuous dueling scene with his frequent co-star and friend, George Sanders. He died en route to the hospital. Yul Brynner was hastily brought in to take over Power's role of Solomon. The filmmakers used some of the long shots that Power had filmed, and an observant fan can see him in some of the scenes, particularly in the middle of the duel. Power's last role was a familiar one, with sword in hand. He is perhaps best remembered as a swashbuckler, and, indeed, he was reportedly one of the finest swordsmen in Hollywood. Director Henry King said, "People always seem to remember Ty with sword in hand, although he once told me he wanted to be a character actor. He actually was quite good – among the best swordsmen in films." Power was buried at Hollywood Forever Cemetery at noon on November 21, 1958, in a military service. (This is a photo of his grave marker.) His son, Tyrone Power Jr., was born on January 22, 1959.
Tags: death  Tyrone  Power  actor 
Added: 26th May 2012
Views: 5147
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 1983
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Posted By: Lava1964
1930 - Construction of The Park Plaza at the Central West End Back in 1930 - In 1928, The Park Plaza was built next to the Chase Hotel in St. Louis at the Central West End, It was done in 1934 and it became a landmark
Tags: Chase  Park  Plaza  1930  St  Louis  Central  West  End  Hotel 
Added: 28th May 2012
Views: 1780
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
London Blitz Photo - 1940 Think we had it tough in North America during the Second World War? We could sleep in our beds at night reasonably certain we weren't going to be blown to smithereens. No so our British allies. This remarkable color photo from October 14, 1940 shows the effects of a typical nighttime air raid targetting London. (The Brits referred to it as "the Blitz.") A large German bomb blew a hole in a street near a bus stop, penetrated through to the Belham underground (subway) station below ground, and killed 68 people who thought they were out of harm's way. Later that same night, a bus travelling in blackout conditions--and thus unaware of the enormous hole in the street--drove into the gaping crater.
Tags: blitz  London  Second  World  War 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 4193
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Posted By: Lava1964
Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 1772
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
AfterMASH TV networks can't leave well enough alone. In February 1983, MASH exited the airwaves in a blaze of glory after 11 successful and brilliant seasons of quality television. Seven months later, CBS reunited a few of its characters in a sequel titled AfterMASH. (The title was intended to be a pun on "aftermath".) The show was set immediately following the end of the Korean War and chronicled the adventures of three characters from the original series: Colonel Potter (played by Harry Morgan), Klinger (Jamie Farr) and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher). By several quirks of fate, all three end up working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri. Rosalind Chao rounded out the starring cast as Soon-Lee Klinger, a Korean refugee whom Klinger met in the last two episodes of MASH and married at the end of the series. AfterMASH premiered on September 26, 1983 in the same Monday night 9:00 p.m. EST. time slot that MASH once had. Curious and faithful MASH fans provided vast audience numbers for that first broadcast. AfterMASH debuted at #1 in the weekly TV ratings--the first time a new show had done that since Laverne and Shirley. It finished 10th out of all network shows for the 1983-1984 season according to Nielsen Media Research television ratings. For its second season CBS disastrously moved the show to Tuesday nights at 8:00 p.m. EST., opposite NBC's top-ten hit The A-Team. CBS launched an optimistic marketing campaign featuring illustrations by Sanford Kossin of Max Klinger in a nurse's uniform, shaving off Mr. T's signature mohawk, theorizing AfterMASH would take a large portion of The A-Team's audience. The exact opposite occurred: AfterMASH's ratings plummeted to near the bottom of the television rankings and the show was canceled just nine episodes into its second season. Twenty-nine AfterMASH episodes had aired, one was shown as late as May 1985. A thirtieth episode was completed but was never broadcast. Comparisons to the original MASH were inevitable and largely unfavorable. In 2002, TV Guide listed AfterMASH, perhaps uncharitably, as the seventh-worst TV series ever.
Tags: TV  AfterMASH  sequel 
Added: 19th June 2012
Views: 1841
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 1257
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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