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Russian Coronation Free Beer Riot - 1896 On Tuesday, May 26, 1896, the elaborate coronation of Czar Nicholas II of Russia occurred in Moscow before an enormous crowd of onlookers. The following day, May 27, to celebrate the new emperor's reign, a massive party was scheduled for the general public. It was to be a large festival with free food, beer, and souvenir cups. The site chosen for the party was Khodynka Field outside Moscow, a venue normally used for military exercises. Khodynka was selected as it was the only place near Moscow large enough to hold the enormous number of citizens who would likely attend. Before the food and drink was handed out, rumors spread that there would not be enough for everyone. As a result, much of the crowd stampeded to get their share. Individuals were tripped and trampled upon. Many hapless onlookers suffocated in the dirt of the field. Of the estimated 100,000 people gathered for the party, 1,389 individuals died and roughly another 1,300 were injured. The Khodynka Tragedy, as it came to be known, was seen as an ill omen for the new czar. Furthermore, the Czar was badly advised to attend a ball on the evening of the catastrophe hosted by the French ambassador to Russia. Nicholas privately wished to observe a period of prayer and mourning for the dead, but his advisors and relatives insisted that he would damage critical Russian-French relations if he did not attend the ball. The decision was seen as callous by many Russian peasants who perceived Nicholas to be frivolous and uncaring toward his subjects.
Tags: Russian  history  Czar  Nicholas  coronation  royalty 
Added: 1st July 2018
Views: 1156
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P1 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag)
Tags: The  Partridge  Family 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 373
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P2 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag) Category
Tags: The  Partridge  Family,  70s 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 423
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 425
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
Metropolis Metropolis is such an amazing movie. Perhaps one of the earliest science-fiction movies I have ever fallen in love with. If you're a fan of romantic science fiction movies, or silent films, this is a must see classic. Though its history is a flop in Weimar Germany, and its original film was lost throughout history, it is an interesting movie to watch. The special effects were ahead of it's time, the movie being from 1927, it is amazing how scenes like the Man-machine's transformation was carried out. I would recommend this to any sci-fi fan.
Tags: Fritz  Lang    Sci-Fi    Future 
Added: 3rd March 2019
Views: 267
Rating:
Posted By: jimmaherlive

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