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Your Hit Parade  Opening Opening Intro for the 50's Television show "Your Hit Parade". Your Hit Parade was a popular radio and television program, sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes and broadcast from 1935 to 1955 on radio and telecast from 1950 to 1959. During this 24-year run, the show had 19 orchestra leaders and 52 singers or groups. Each Saturday evening at 8pm, a hit parade of the more popular and bestselling songs of the week were presented. The original format involved a presentation of the top 15 tunes. Later, a countdown with fanfares led to the top three finalists, with the number one song for the finale. Occasional performances of standards and other favorite songs from the past were known as "Lucky Strike Extras." Listeners were informed that "Your Hit Parade survey checks the best sellers on sheet music and phonograph records, the songs most heard on the air and most played on the automatic coin machines, an accurate, authentic tabulation of America's taste in popular music." However, the exact procedure of this "authentic tabulation" remained a secret. Some believe song choices were often arbitrary due to various performance and production factors. The show's ad agencies never revealed the specific sources or the methods that were used to determine the top hits.
Tags: your  hit  parade  50s  television  music 
Added: 11th October 2007
Views: 2472
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Posted By: Naomi
Eric Clapton Live            LAYLA The story behind the song goes something like this. In 1966, George Harrison married Pattie Boyd, a model he met during the filming of A Hard Day's Night. During the late 1960s, Clapton and Harrison became good friends. Clapton contributed guitar work on Harrison's song "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" on The Beatles' White Album but remained uncredited, and Harrison played guitar pseudonymously on Cream's "Badge" from Goodbye. However, trouble was brewing for Clapton. Besides his difficulty in keeping a band together and his growing heroin addiction, when Boyd came to him for aid during marital troubles, Clapton fell desperately in love with her. The title, "Layla", was inspired by the Persian love story, The Story of Layla, by the Persian classical poet Nezami. When he wrote "Layla", Clapton had recently been given a copy of the story by a friend who was in the process of converting to Islam. Nezami's tale, about a moon-princess who was married off by her father to someone other than the man who was desperately in love with her, resulting in his madness, struck a deep chord with Clapton. Boyd divorced Harrison in 1977 and married Clapton in 1979. Harrison was not bitter about the divorce and attended Clapton's wedding with Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney. During their relationship, Clapton wrote another love ballad for her, "Wonderful Tonight." Clapton and Boyd divorced in 1989 after several years of separation.
Tags: eric  clapton  layla    patty  boyd 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 3420
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
The Chordettes The Chordettes were a barbershop-style quartet of female singers from Wisconsin. From 1954 to 1961, they placed thirteen songs in the top one hundred and were a very popular singing group. Their song Mr Sandman remained at number one in the charts for 20 weeks.
Tags: chordettes  lollipop  music   
Added: 18th October 2007
Views: 11087
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Posted By: Tony
Total Eclipse of the Heart What a cool song, even now it sounds just as good as when she first performed it. Bonnie Tyler was born Gaynor Hopkins on June 8, 1951 in Skewen in Wales. She is widely recognisable by her highly distinctive, husky voice. In 1977, Tyler underwent surgery to remove nodules on her vocal cords, resulting in her singing voice taking on a raspy quality. Her next hit single, a cover of "It's a Heartache" was taken from Tyler's second album. In spring of 1983 came the single "Total Eclipse of the Heart", written by Jim Steinman. The song was a worldwide smash and reached no.1 in no less than 18 countries including the UK, France, Australia, Japan, Germany, Canada, and the United States, where it remained at the top for 4 weeks. In September 2006, Tyler made her first appearance on U.S. television in many years, as she sang a duet of "Total Eclipse of the Heart" with actress and now singer Lucy Lawless on the Celebrity Duets.
Tags: total  eclipse  of  the  heart  bonnie  tyler  80s  music 
Added: 28th October 2007
Views: 2769
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
    Remembering Robert Goulet Robert Goulet passed away this morning (10/30) while awaiting a lung transplant at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after being found last month to have a rare form of pulmonary fibrosis. He had remained in good spirits even as he waited for the transplant, said Vera Goulet, his wife of 25 years. "Just watch my vocal cords," she said he told doctors before they inserted a breathing tube. He was the only son of French Canadian parents, Joseph Georges Andre Goulet and the former Jeanette Gauthier. Though he was born in Massachusetts, his parents moved back to Canada just a few months after his birth. He gained stardom in 1960 with "Camelot," the Lerner and Loewe musical that starred Richard Burton as King Arthur and Julie Andrews as his Queen Guenevere. In his last performance Sept. 20 in Syracuse, N.Y., the crooner was backed by a 15-piece orchestra as he performed the one-man show "A Man and his Music." Robert Goulet won a 1968 Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical for this performance in " The Happy Time". He was 73.
Tags: robert  goulet  entertainers  pulmonary  fibrosis   
Added: 30th October 2007
Views: 1940
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Posted By: Naomi
Mothers Little Helper Miles Laboratories was founded as the DR. MILES MEDICAL COMPANY in Elkhart, Indiana, in 1884 by Franklin Miles, a specialist in the treatment of eye and ear disorders, with an interest in the connection of the nervous system to overall health. By 1890, the sales success of his patent medicine tonic, DR. MILES' NERVINE, in treating "nervous" ailments (including "nervousness or nervous exhaustion, sleeplessness, hysteria, headache, neuralgia, backache, pain, epilepsy, spasms, fits, and St. Vitus' dance") led him to develop a mail order medicine business. Miles also published Medical News, a thinly disguised marketing vehicle for Nervine. Nervine remained on the market as a "calmative" until the late 1960s...
Tags: vintage  ad  dr.  miles  nervine  nerve  pills 
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 2326
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Posted By: Teresa
Scopes Trial 1925 One of the most famous trials in American history was the 1925 Scopes trial in Dayton, Tennessee. John T. Scopes, a young science teacher, was charged with violating the Butler Act, a state law that, in a roundabout way, prohibited the teaching of evolution in public schools. Scopes was quickly relegated to a minor character in the trial as the two lawyers took center stage. Civil libertarian groups hired famed defense lawyer Clarence Darrow (on the left) to represent Scopes. The prosecution obtained the services of former presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan (right), a renowned creationist and famous orator. The highlight of the trial occurred when Darrow called Bryan to testify as an expert on the Bible. (The jury was out of the courtroom when Darrow cross-examined Bryan, and the entire exchange was expunged from the court record as the judge ruled it was irrelevant to whether or not Scopes had broken the law.) Scopes was eventually found guilty and fined $100. The conviction was later overturned on a technicality: the jury was supposed to establish the fine, not the judge. Actually, the trial should not have even occurred. Scopes was not at school on the day cited in the charge. The Butler Act remained on the books in Tennessee until 1976. The trial inspired the 1960 movie Inherit The Wind.
Tags: Scopes  trial  Bryan  Darrow 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1932
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shipwreck Kelly - Flagpole Sitter One of the weirder phenomena of the 1920s was the popularity of flagpole-sitting, a strange publicity gimmick mastered by Alvin (Shipwreck) Kelly. In 1924 Kelly was hired by a Hollywood press agent to promote a new film by sitting on the flagpole above the Los Angeles theater where the movie was playing. He remained there for 13 hours and 13 days, starting a bizarre national craze. By 1928 Kelly was earning over $100 per day for his stunts--fantastic money in those days. The apex of Kelly's career occurred in 1930 when he spent 1,177 hours atop a 125-foot flagpole at Atlantic City's Steel Pier. The Great Depression, however, diminished the public's appetite for such stunts. By the end of 1930 Kelly's stunts were earning him little more than pocket change. His last public appearance of any significance occurred in 1939. Broke and on welfare, Kelly dropped dead in 1952 while walking between two parked cars in New York City. Clutched tightly in one arm was a scrapbook containing clippings and momentos from his glory days as King of the Flagpole Sitters.
Tags: Shipwreck  Kelly  Flagpole  Sitter 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 13835
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Posted By: Lava1964
Anna Taylor Niagara Falls Daredevil On October 24, 1901, Anna Edson Taylor became the first person to plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel and live to tell about it. The 43-year-old school teacher from Bay City, Michigan had no credentials as a daredevil. Anna could not even swim! She dreamed up the scheme merely as a money-making ploy. She rode in a 160-pound oak barrel. It was only 4-1/2 feet long and just 4 feet in diameter at its widest point. The barrel contained a 100-pound anvil that served as ballast to keep it upright in the water. A crude pump supplied Anna with air. Cushions fastened with leather straps were intended to keep Anna from getting hurt. Seven iron hoops were all that held the barrel together. The stunt was well publicized and several thousand people were on hand to view the event. They watched the barrel descend down the 167-foot waterfall. (It took three seconds.) It remained submerged at the bottom for another 10 seconds. When the barrel was hauled out of the water, Anna emerged bruised and bleeding from a slight cut behind her right ear. She was babbling incoherently for a few moments, but she had survived. Anna attempted to cash in on her achievement with public speaking engagements. However, from all accounts, she spoke in a boring, emotionless, raspy monotone that put audiences to sleep. Furthermore, she stupidly got rid of the barrel--a rather important prop that would have added immensely to her dull lecture. For years afterwards Anna eked out a meager living selling autographs in Niagara Falls beside a facsimile barrel. She died in 1921.
Tags: Anna  Edson  Niagara  Falls  daredevil 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 4573
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Posted By: Lava1964
Twiggy The scrawny modern supermodel originated with Twiggy, a British model, in 1967. Her real name was Lesley Hornby. She weighed just 90 pounds and had measurements of 31-23-32. Her 27-year-old boyfriend/manager, Nigel Davies, skilfully packaged Hornby as Twiggy, and within months she became the world's top fashion model, appearing in Vogue and Elle magazines before taking New York by storm. Twiggy's cropped haircut (shorter than most boys wore at the time) made her something of an androgynous figure. Her trademark was to paint eyelashes on her lower lids. These became known as Twiggies. Over the years, Twiggy's exceedingly slim figure was blamed for the rise in anorexia cases. Depite her fame, Twiggy remained humble and true to her East London roots. She once told Life Magazine, 'I know I'm not beautiful or glam. But with me funny face, me funny skirts, and me funny accent, somehow it combined to work out just lovely.'
Tags: Twiggy  model 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 1822
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Posted By: Lava1964

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