Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3568
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
First Color Photo Of Earth This is the first full face color portrait of the earth taken by the DODGE satellite. It was taken 18'100 miles into space. This is picture taken 1967. The hurricane above the gulf of Mexico is the Beulah hurricane. The image was taken with a black an white TV camera which took three photos with a red, green and a blue filter to create the color image. The small disc in front of the picture is a color match card.
Tags: First  Color  Photo  Of  Earth  1950's  50's  1959  DODGE  satellite  DigiColor   
Added: 1st December 2014
Views: 1080
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
Irv Weinstein - Last Newscast Farewell I generally try to make posts that appeal to the widest variety of people, so you might rightly ask, "Who is Irv Weinstein?" If you lived in western New York or southern Ontario from 1964 to 1998, Irv was the familiar anchorman of Buffalo's WKBW newscasts. Irv combined with weatherman Tom Jolls and sports director Rick Azar for more than 30 years of service to Eyewitness News on Channel 7, an ABC affiliate. Their news program regularly attained higher ratings than the other two Buffalo newscasts combined. For some reason, Eyewitness News had a strong following in Ontario--although there was no logical reason why anyone in Canada should regularly watch a Buffalo newscast. Irv was famous for his alliterations. You could pretty much count on a news story about "pistol-packing punks" or "Buffalo's blaze busters." Here is the final three minutes of Irv's last broadcast from December 31, 1998 showing Irv's farewell speech. It is surprisingly touching.
Tags: Irv  Weinstein  Buffalo  Eyewitness  News  anchorman 
Added: 3rd April 2013
Views: 1518
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Brooks and Frank Robinson Commercial Remember this amusing Lite Beer commercial from 1980 featuring former Baltimore Orioles Brooks and Frank Robinson?
Tags: Lite  Beer  Miller  Frank  Brooks  Robinson 
Added: 13th August 2013
Views: 1013
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Willie Mays Apartment - 1954 This photo really is out of the past. It was taken in 1954, the year Willie Mays dominated the National League and would be named its MVP. It shows him in his small apartment in the Harlem section of New York City. The woman in the photo is his landlady/cook. It is slightly misleading, though. Mays was among the highest paid players in MLB in 1954, but while the Giants were in New York, Mays chose to live in Harlem as a simple tenant. When the Giants moved to San Francisco, Mays bought luxurious homes. (He also got himself into big financial troubles because his worldly, socialite wife was a spendthrift.)
Tags: Willie  Mays  MLB  apartment 
Added: 20th September 2013
Views: 1727
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
John Madden Lite Beer Commercial Before John Madden became a familiar voice on NFL broadcasts, he was the fiery, hyperenergetic coach of the Oakland Raiders. Madden parodies himself in this Miller Lite Beer commercial from 1980.
Tags: John  Madden  NFL  coach  Miller  Lite  Beer  commercial 
Added: 9th October 2013
Views: 1133
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lite Beer Commercial - 1978 These commercials were great in their day. This Miller Lite Beer ad featured ex-MLB slugger Boog Powell and ex-American League umpire Jim Honochick.
Tags: Lite  Beer  Commercial  Boog  Powell  Jim  Honochick 
Added: 16th November 2014
Views: 1018
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1827
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Boys Novel - Scouts in Bondage I'm going to assume when this novel was published in 1930 that the very literal meaning of 'bondage' (being under the supervision or control of another person) was intended here.
Tags: Scouts  in  Bondage  novel  title 
Added: 6th April 2015
Views: 759
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Beamon Shatters Long Jump Record Back in 2007 I posted another video on this topic, but this one is much better in quality--and substance. To me this clip shows the greatest single individual accomplishment in the history of sports: Bob Beamon obliterating the world record for the long jump in 1968. Going into the Mexico City Olympics, Bob Beamon was having a bad year on the international athletics circuit. His teammate, Ralph Boston, was thought to be the best hope for the USA to win the gold medal in the long jump. That all changed on the first jump of the finals. Beamon executed a technically flawless leap and seemed to accelerate in mid air. When he landed there was a problem: Beamon had surpassed the officials' ability to measure the jump with the equipment they had available. The existing world record was 27 feet 4.75 inches. During the tense time when everyone was waiting for a measurement, Boston told Beamon, "Bob, I think it's past 29 feet." Incredulous, Beamon replied, "What happened to 28 feet?" After an agonizingly long delay because an old-fashioned tape measure had to be found, Beamon's jump was measured at 8.90 meters. That's 29 feet 2.5 inches. Beamon had surpassed the old mark by 21.75 inches. To put that into proper perspective, in the previous 32 years the world record for the long jump had advanced only eight inches. Beamon started to celebrate but was quickly overcome by the enormity of what he had done. He collapsed on the infield and wept uncontrollably; his body became limp like a rag doll. Some people credit Beamon's leap to the high altitude of Mexico City, but if that were the case it would have helped the other jumpers too. No one else even came close to the old world record! Beamon's record stood for nearly 23 years. Although it was broken by Mike Powell in 1991, Beamon's jaw-dropping achievement is a testament to untapped human potential.
Tags: Bob  Beamon  long  jump  world  record  Mexico  City  Olympics 
Added: 27th June 2015
Views: 1068
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 of 7 | Random