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Was Dorothy Kilgallen Murdered Here's one for you conspiracy theorists to ponder: Was newspaper columnist Dorothy Kilgallen murdered? Famous for her role as a permanent panelist on the CBS show What's My Line? and for her Voice of Broadway entertainment/gossip column in the New York Journal American, Kilgallen often covered major news events--especially murder trials. She reported on the Sam Sheppard murder trial and the Lindbergh kidnapping case, among others. She also expressed serious doubts about the Warren Commission's investigation of JFK's murder. Kilgallen interviewed Jack Ruby in prison shortly before her death on November 8, 1965. Just hours after she had appeared live and quite chipper on What's My Line? from 10:30 to 11 p.m., the 52-year-old Kilgallen was found dead in her Manhattan home, fully clothed, sitting up on a bed in which she did not sleep still wearing the makeup and false eyelashes she had on the previous night. (Dorothy always removed her false eyelashes before retiring for the night.) A book she had finished reading months ago was on her bed. She needed glasses to read but her spectacles were nowhere near her. Although alcohol and barbiturates were found in her blood stream and a mysterious pink liquid in her stomach, Kilgallen's official cause of death was listed as undetermined. At least three different people in the household claim to have been the first to discover Dorothy dead on the bed: Her secretary, her hairdresser, and her maid. Reports of the time when Dorothy's body was discovered vary wildly--anywhere from about 10:30 a.m. to about 3 p.m. The coroner who did the paperwork was responsible for autopsies in Brooklyn--not Manhattan. Kilgallen's notes from her interview with Jack Ruby were never found--leading conspiracy theorists to wonder whether she had been silenced.
Tags: Dorothy  Kilgallen  death  conspiracy 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2725
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1582
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lava Quiz 1927 It's back...by popular demand...the next Lava Quiz! This one deals with the year 1927. Turn back the clock 81 years and give it a try. 1. Who was president of the United States? 2. Who was on the British throne? 3. Gene Tunney defended his world heavyweight title against Jack Dempsey. Who won the fight and why is it so famous? 4. This infamous resident of Fall River, Massachusetts died. Her gravestone simply says 'Lizbeth.' Who was she? 5. The Academy Awards were created. What film won the Oscar for best picture? 6. These two anarchists were executed for a 1921 crime that many people believed they did not commit. Name them. 7. Babe Ruth broke his own record of 59 home runs for a season by swatting 60. Who was the pitcher who surrendered Ruth's historic 60th home run? 8. Charles Lindbergh made history by flying solo across the Atlantic Ocean from New York to Paris. He did so to win a prize. What was the name of the prize and how much money did Lindbergh win? 9. Gutzon Borglum began work on this project on October 4, 1927. What was the project? 10. She was arrested for violating morals laws by appearing in a show called 'Sex' and making suggestive comments. Name her.
Tags: Lava  Quiz  1927 
Added: 14th February 2008
Views: 1365
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Calvin Coolidge Honors Charles Lindbergh This is something you've probably never heard before: It's a 1927 speech by president Calvin Coolidge honoring aviation hero Charles Lindbergh. (Lindy, of course, had successfully flown solo from New York to Paris in May 1927.) Coolidge's quirky New England accent makes its appearance a couple of times.
Tags: Calvin  Coolidge  Charles  Lindbergh 
Added: 22nd April 2008
Views: 1056
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Posted By: Lava1964
Calvin Coolidge Honors Charles Lindbergh This is the actual speech, recorded in 1927, given by President Calvin Coolidge on the occasion of Charles Lindbergh returning to America after his famous trans-Atlantic flight.
Tags: speech  Calvin  Coolidge  Charles  Lindbergh 
Added: 15th December 2008
Views: 1057
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Posted By: Lava1964
German Children of Charles Lindbergh In 1927, Charles Lindbergh, a virtualy unknown air mail pilot from Minnesota, became a worldwide celebrity with his daring solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean. He remained a beloved American hero until the onset of the Second World War when his isolationist views thinly disguised an admiration for Nazi Germany. Twenty-nine years after Lindbergh died in 1974, Lindbergh's reputation took another beating. It was revealed he had fathered at least seven children with three German mistressess during his many trips abroad in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2003 three of them, the children of Brigitte Hesshaimer, produced 112 letters Lindbergh had written to their mother along with childhood photographs with the famed aviator and their own recollections of the tall, lanky man who they knew as Careau Kent. DNA tests conclusively proved they were Lindbergh's children. The Hesshaimer children, born between 1958 and 1967, said they didn't realize Lindbergh was their father until the early 1980s when Bouteuil, the middle child, began asking questions. After discovering a bundle of letters allegedly written by Lindbergh and addressed to her mother, Bouteuil confronted her and was finally told that Kent was actually Lindbergh. The children promised to keep the secret until both their mother and Lindbergh's widow, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, were deceased. Both died in 2001. The revelation stunned Lindbergh's Pulitzer-prize winning biographer, A. Scott Berg, who told the Associated Press when the siblings made their claim, it would have been "out of character for Lindbergh to father the siblings." The Hesshaimers say Lindbergh met their mother, a Munich hatmaker, and fell in love in the mid-1950s when he spent much of his time traveling. Lindbergh would visit the family once or twice a year when the children were young, staying for five days to two weeks, Dyrk Hesshaimer said, and their mother forbade them from discussing their father outside of the family. “We quickly built up a close relationship to him,” he said. “We didn't have the time together with him that other children had with their fathers, but when he was there he concentrated very intensively on us.” Bouteil recalled breakfasts where her mother and Lindbergh would talk for hours, and of the people he'd met. “I knew he was something special,” Dyrk Hesshaimer said. “He had knowledge about U.S. politics that wasn't in the news at the time.” Their mother received what would be her final letter dated Aug. 16, 1974. It read, “I am losing energy everyday. My love to you and the children, all I can send.” Brigitte Hesshaimer later read in the papers that Lindbergh had died of cancer on Aug. 26, 1974 She told her children simply that their father was dead. Subsequent research by German investigators found that Lindbergh had fathered four other children with two other German women.
Tags: Charles  Linbdergh  paternity  scandal 
Added: 22nd December 2013
Views: 1607
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Posted By: Lava1964
Time Cover - Lindbergh Baby Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., who was famously abducted on March 1, 1932, was on the cover of Time magazine two months later on May 2. Ten days later the decomposed remains of the toddler were discovered in a woods not far from the house where he was taken.
Tags: Lindbergh  baby  kidnapping  Time  magazine 
Added: 3rd September 2009
Views: 1120
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Posted By: Lava1964
Failed Nungesser-Coli Flight 1927 Twelve days before Charles Lindbergh's famous first successful trans-Atlantic flight in 1927, two Frenchmen attempted the feat in the reverse direction but tragically vanished. Charles Eugène Jules Marie Nungesser and Francois Coli left Paris’s Le Bourget Airport on May 8, 1927, to fly across the Atlantic non-stop. They hoped to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize offered by a New York City hotelier while confirming France's place atop the postwar aviation world. The two co-pilots had been aviators in the First World War. Nungesser, a fighter pilot, had the third-highest rating for air combat victories amongst French pilots. François Coli was also an ace pilot who commanded a wartime squadron even though he had lost an eye while serving in the French infantry. They set off in the Levasseur PL.8 biplane – a fixed-wing aircraft with two superimposed main wings – named l’Oiseau Blanc (The White Bird) to fly the 3,600 miles from Paris to New York City without halting. The cockpit had been enlarged so that both could fit in. Their task was more difficult than Lindbergh's because they were flying into the wind and thus required more fuel. Their plane carried 11,000 pounds and barely got off the ground. Initial news reports circulated in France that the aviators had safely landed in New York, causing joyous celebrations to erupt in Paris. However, those reports were completely untrue: Nungesser and Coli’s plane disappeared somewhere over the Atlantic. The last verified sighting was when l’Oiseau Blanc was seen near Etretat off the coast of Upper Normandy. The twosome's flight plan would have taken them across southern England, then across Ireland to the Canadian coast and from there down to New York City. There were unverified reports of l’Oiseau Blanc being seen near Ireland and being heard near Newfoundland and the French islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon. Nevertheless, no sign of the airplane has ever been found. Three attempts to find wreckage--the last one occurring in June 2012--have all resulted in nothing.
Tags: aviation  Nungesser  and  Coli 
Added: 24th November 2013
Views: 845
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1661
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lindbergh Baby Body Found Tags: Charles  Lindbergh  baby  kidnapping  Hopewell  New  Jersey  aviation  pioneer  The  Spirit  of  St.  Louis  ransom  note 
Added: 12th May 2015
Views: 677
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Posted By: Cliffy

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