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Sega Star Kid Challenge at  Universal Studios in Orlando FL 1992 Part I Sorry for the video quality, as there is a limit to what I can upload according to the limit this web site has, till its fixed.. this is the best I can do "here" 1992 Aqua Team- Brandon Call, Nicole Dubuc, Chelsea Hertford, Adam Jeffries, Haylie Johnson, Mario Lopez, Carol-Ann Plante, Jill Setter, Taran Smith. Blue Team- Olivia Burnette, Corey Carrier, Joey Lawrence, Ashlee Levitch, Kellie Martin, Jeremy Miller, Josh Saviano, Jodie Sweetin, Tiffani-Amber Thiessen. Coral Team- Mayim Bialik, Janel Bishop, Zachery Ty Bryan, Josh Byrne, Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Sylver Gregory, Matthew Lawrence, Brittany Murphy, Danny Pintauro. Fuschia Team- Candace Hutson, Ashley Johnson, A.J. Langer, Darius McCrary, Christopher Pettiet, David Rhoden, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Jenna Von Oy, Angela Watson. The right way, yup in the 90's..they should do things like that now a days to raise money for good causes like these.
Tags: Sega  Star  Kid  Challenge  at    Universal  Studios  in  Orlando  FL  1992  Part  I 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1266
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1497
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Nestle Magic Ball aka The Wonder Ball 1997 Better known as Nestle Wonder Ball is a spherical, thin shell of milk chocolate with candy inside, wrapped in foil, placed in a small box, and packaged with a collectible sticker. The product's slogan is "What's In the Wonder Ball?" Originally called Nestle Magic Ball, the product used to contain small figurines of Disney characters, similar to the Kinder Surprise which retails in Europe. However, due to choking hazard concerns, the product was withdrawn in 1997. The theme song for these was totally addicting: “Oh, I wonder, wonder, what’s in a Wonder Ball!”. Don’t act like you’re not singing it to yourself right now. Oh, and these amazing little candies came with a surprise candy inside, plus a sticker. Does it get much better?
Tags: Nestle  Magic  Ball  aka  The  Wonder  Ball  1997 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1642
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Surge The Drink Commercial 1997 My guess due to not selling enough, they stopped production?.. Crazy right? I know.. great stuff.. I'd drink this over Mountain Dew since it came out. As a Kid I grabbed for this in the fridge first! after School 1996 In 1996, Coca-Cola started production on Surge, a variation of the Norwegian soft drink named Urge. Surge was produced and marketed in the United States, with its original whitepaper name being "MDK," or "Mountain Dew Killer."[1] Surge's release was accompanied by a vast nationwide marketing campaign that led to initially high sales and popularity. A few years after the release, sales began to slip, and as a result the Coca-Cola company ceased production of Surge in can and bottle form in 2002. They proceeded to discontinue Surge fountain syrup in 2003. Save Surge: After the discontinuation of Surge in cans, a community was formed by web designer Eric "Karks" Karkovach entitled "SAVE SURGE." The movement initially mapped the locations at which Surge could be purchased in fountain form. Upon cancellation of the fountain syrup, the community continued, adopting an approach of activism. Members would create "recipes" meant to mimic the look and taste of Surge, sign and distribute petitions, protest at their local bottling plants, and otherwise pressure Coca-Cola to bring back their favorite beverage. They got a response in 2005 when Vault was brought to market, and while Coca-Cola has yet to confirm the similarity in taste and appearance, the members of the movement took the inception of Vault as the fruit of their labors. Its really simple. Surge Movement Upon the discontinuation of Vault in December 2011, the "SURGE MOVEMENT" formed on Facebook as an activist group to lobby Coca-Cola for the soft drink's return. Sharing the same goal as its predecessor, the group seeks to have Surge produced once more, as a result of Vault's discontinuation. The group repetitively posts requests on Coca-Cola's Facebook page, and encourages its members to call Coca-Cola's feedback hotline to voice their desires further. The Movement initially has gained over 9,000 Facebook "likes" in the months after it was started and continues to grow. The members plan on continuing to flood the walls of Coca-Cola and its subsidiaries until they receive an official statement from the company. Bring it back?...YES.. why not Most likely it will be a hit due to the fact its been gone for some time..One last thing, yes the Original design can was the best.. it wasn't made with straight edges like the 2nd edition.. it was meant to be different with the bubble style lettering!
Tags: Surge  The  Drink  Commercial  1997 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1246
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
French Toast Crunch 1995 Sorry no commercial, couldn't find a decent one; till then look at the picture. French Toast Crunch is a breakfast cereal launched in 1995 artificially flavored to taste like French toast, by the General Mills company. The cereal pieces originally looked like mini slices of French toast, but General Mills changed the cereal to a style similar in appearance to Cinnamon Toast Crunch; a thin, wavy square sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar flavoring. In 2006, General Mills discontinued French Toast Crunch in the United States. French Toast Crunch is still produced and marketed in Canada as "French Toast Crunch" and "Croque pain doré." Canadian French Toast Crunch is made in the original recipe and form (mini slices). It is available worldwide through online retailers.
Tags: French  Toast  Crunch  Commercial  1995 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1995
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
The Famous Slimer Ecto Cooler  Commercial 1990s Sorry for the bad video, best I could do till I find a better one. This belongs int he 80's and 90's section, More the 90's why? Cause it was so awesome and sold like crazy. Ecto-Cooler was a product tie-in with the cartoon series The Real Ghostbusters, based on the 1984 live-action film, Ghostbusters. Hi-C struck a deal in 1987 to promote the series by developing a drink. Expected to last only as long as the series, the drink was successful beyond expectations and continued after the series' 1991 cancellation to be produced for more than a decade. The Ecto-Cooler box featured The Real Ghostbusters character Slimer, as did the commercials. Slimer left the box sometime around 1997, but Minute Maid did not discontinue the product until 2001, at which point it was renamed Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen. Slimer was replaced on the packaging by a similar-looking blob of lips. The product was still noted as ecto cool on many store receipts. In 2006, Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen was renamed Crazy Citrus Cooler. In 2007, Crazy Citrus Cooler was discontinued. In 2011, a Chicago Ghostbusters group made a recipe that was said to taste exactly like the original.
Tags: The  Famous  Slimer  Ecto  Cooler    Commercial  1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1028
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Bubble Tape  6 Feet of Bubble Gum Commercial 1991 It belongs here in the 90's section do to its Popularity in the 90's for Kids. Bubble Tape is a brand of bubble gum produced by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, introduced in the late 1980s[1][2]. It experienced its greatest popularity in the early 1990s due to its unique packaging and direct marketing to preteen children ("it's six feet of bubble gum for you, not them"—"them" referring to parents or just adults in general). Today, it is still a common find in most supermarkets, although advertising campaigns for it have subsided significantly. Bubble Tape comes in a small, round, plastic container similar in size to a hockey puck. This contains six feet (1.8 m) of gum wrapped in a spiral. The container functions much like a tape dispenser, although the top half can be removed.
Tags: Bubble  Tape    6  Feet  of  Bubble  Gum  Commercial  1991   
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1119
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Charms Blow Pops Commercial Early 1990s It goes in the 90's section due to Popularity with Kids in the 90's. I know you can still buy Blow Pops everywhere (thank God for that), but between the clothes and the silly props, I feel like they just don’t make commercials like this anymore. Also, just like with Mentos, the idea of Blow Pops was so much more awesome back then than it is now. I mean, a lollipop that ended in gum? It doesn’t get much better than that
Tags: Charms  Blow  Pops  Commercial  Early  1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1099
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Sprinkle Spangles Commercial 1994 Yes, when it was out I ate these.. not a lot but I did like them. Sprinkle Spangles Commercial 1994. Sprinkle Spangles was a short-lived breakfast cereal by General Mills. It was introduced in the early 90s, alongside Hidden Treasures. The cereal was of star-shaped pieces covered with multi-colored sprinkles. The commercials claimed that they "Spangled every angle with sprinkles." Sprinkle Spangles were no longer available in 1995. Mascot: The Sprinkle Spangles mascot was the Sprinkle Genie (voiced by Dom DeLuise). He would often appear in front of children who wished they had sprinkles for breakfast. The Sprinkle Genie's own catchphrase was: "You wish it, I dish it!" The mascot was dropped before the cereal was retired. Some say that the General Mills Sprinkled Cookie Crisp Cereal (Released in 2009) tastes very similar to the retired Sprinkle Spangles cereal.
Tags: Sprinkle  Spangles  Commercial  1994 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 840
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Fruit By The Foot Commercial January 24 1991 Fruit by the Foot is a fruit snack made by Betty Crocker. Fruit by the Foot was introduced January 24, 1991 and is still in production. Fruit by the Foot is very similar to Fruit Roll-Ups (also a General Mills product), in its presentation of being rolled up within itself, but differs in taste, dimension and consumption methods. The similarity in name and concept is such that many people sometimes mistakenly refer to Fruit by the Foot as "Fruit Roll-Ups" and vice versa. The candy is 3 feet (0.91 m) long, and has a loop at the end. Fruit by the Foot is commonly known as Fruit Roll-Ups like its sister brand. Current marketing slogans include "3 Feet of Fun!" In the early 90s, Fruit by the Foot came with stickers that kids would frequently put on their lunch boxes to prove they had eaten Fruit by the Foot. The original Fruit by the Foot came with a long sticker which is no longer included. Since the 1990s, the paper backing has been printed with games, jokes, or trivia facts - though not all flavors have it, such as 'Rippin Berry Berry'.
Tags: Fruit  By  The  Foot  Commercial  January  24  1991 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1872
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31

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