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Ron Palillo Actor Ron Palillo is best known for his role as the timid, dorkish Arnold Horshack on the 1970s sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Palillo was born on April 2, 1949, in Cheshire, CT. He became interested in acting at an early age. By age 14, Palillo had started a profitable summer theater enterprise in his hometown. After high school, Palillo attended the University of Connecticut where he majored in drama. After graduation, Palillo took a job with a touring Shakepeare company. Palillo later moved to New York City and acquired a role in the successful off-Broadway play Hot-L Baltimore with which he stayed for over a year. Palillo's stage success led to his role as Horshack on Welcome Back, Kotter in 1975. Although he was playing the part of a high school student, Palillo was 26 years old when the show debuted. In contrast, teacher Gabe Kotter (played by Gabe Kaplan) was only 30. The Horshack character is fondly remembered for his odd, nasal, hyena-like laugh and his childish way of yelling 'Oh! Oh! Oh!' whenever he raised his hand to answer a question. When the sitcom was axed in 1979, Palillo found it difficult to obtain new acting roles. To distance himself form the Horshack character, he had a nose job and a chin job. Palillo did make onetime appearances in a few TV shows such as Love Boat, Cagney and Lacey, and The A-Team, but he has definitely faded from the limelight. One website, Washed Up Celebrities, claims Palillo will talk to anyone for a $20 fee.
Tags: Ron  Palillo  actor  Arnold  Horshack  Welcome  Back  Kotter 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 2155
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 2936
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Posted By: Lava1964
One-Legged Wrestler Wins NCAA Title Arizona State University (ASU) senior wrestler Anthony Robles capped off his college career accomplishing the most difficult task in the sport: winning the NCAA Championship. He earned the 2011 125-pound title with an impressive 7-1 decision over Iowa sophomore and defending national champion Matt McDonough on March 19. The championship victory didn’t come easy, but the 21-year-old Mesa, Arizona native is no stranger to overcoming odds. Robles was born with just one leg, but that never stopped him from doing anything any two-legged person can do. Since he was a toddler, Robles refused any special assistance typically allotted for someone missing a limb. According to reports, he tossed aside his prosthetic leg when he was only 3, choosing instead to hop on one leg or use his arms to walk. When he reached the sixth grade, he broke a record at his school for the most pushups performed. But the record-setting performances didn’t stop there. Robles first started wrestling in the eighth grade, joining in after watching one of his cousins during a practice. He stuck with it and by the time he reached age 17, he had won two Arizona state wrestling championships, earning a 46-0 record during his junior and senior years at Mesa High School. He remained successful at ASU, earning All-American honors, along with a couple Pac-10 Conference titles. But Robles said the National Title was by far his greatest athletic accomplishment so far. “I had a lot of butterflies going out there. I’ve dreamt about stepping on that stage a dozen times, and this whole year I’ve just been preparing for that moment,” Robles told the Daily Iowan. “I was scared. I was scared out there, but as soon as I hit that first takedown, I sort of relaxed.” Most may immediately think of the disadvantages a one-legged fighter may have, but there are a few advantages to wrestling with just one leg, too. Because he doesn’t carry the weight of an additional leg, Robles can weigh in at 125 pounds with a lot more muscle weight in his upper body than his opponents. He has also developed a unique style of wrestling with just one leg, which opponents have difficulties preparing for. “First time wrestling a tough opponent like that, it’s quite obvious there’s a difference in style of someone that has one leg and a large upper body as opposed to anyone else in the country,” said McDonough, who will return as the nation’s top wrestler next year. “It’s definitely not an experience to take lightly…” Robles, who will graduate from ASU in May, told ESPN reporters that his wrestling days are now over, but he plans on pursuing a career in public speaking. He always told the media that he wrestles for the love of the sport, and he’ll apply that same passion towards uplifting and motivating those in need. "It inspires me when I get kids, even adults, who write me on Facebook and send me letters in the mail saying that I've inspired them," Robles told USA Today. “I want to keep it up.”
Tags: Anthony  Robles  NCAA  wrestling 
Added: 22nd March 2011
Views: 1018
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Posted By: Lava1964
What is your biggest financial challenges Everything is going up but our paychecks. It seems like a money drain. What has been your biggest financial challenge lately? What money saving ideas have you found? Please share it with us.
Tags: Financial  Challenges,  Money,  Money  Saving 
Added: 25th March 2011
Views: 789
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Posted By: Steve
Marilyn Monroe Famous Photo Seven Year Itch famous photo wasn't spontaneous was we like to think!
Tags: Marilyn  Monroe,  Famous  Photo,  Seven  Year  Itch 
Added: 2nd April 2011
Views: 2733
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Posted By: pfc
1948 Easter Present As seen in the March 1948 issue of Seventeen magazine. A dress ad employing product placement (Pepsi), and showing an Easter bunny that looks a little like Chucky from the 1988 film Child's Play. LOL
Tags: 1948  Easter  fashions   
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 1306
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1962 Easter Church Etiquette For Teens From Seventeen magazine March 1962. An Easter tutorial about attending church. Just amazing. What didn't the vintage Seventeen magazine's cover? Who talks about this stuff today? It's not even politically correct to say you even GO to church today! There's some useful material here if you look past gloves and stockings being necessary. LOL My parents stopped letting me bring a friend with us to church because all we did was giggle. Kids. We'd just look at each other and start to laugh. I think it was because we knew we weren't supposed to laugh in church, but that made it harder NOT to. I like the part about preparing for the collection ahead of time. I remember all those people who held up the basket and made jingling racket while searching their pockets for coins. Another thing about being prepared, you won't accidentally give a ten dollar bill instead of the miserly one dollar you actually MEANT to give. LOL
Tags: easter  church  etiquette  teens  VintageSeventeenMagazine   
Added: 24th April 2011
Views: 2794
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1948 Easter Brunch From the pages of Seventeen magazine March 1948. An Easter brunch layout. Artwork by Valz. This is a very humble brunch by today's standards. Even for teens to give.I like the colored Easter eggs used for decoration. Better not touch those, I guess. LOL
Tags: Easter  1948  brunch  teens  VintageSeventeenMagazine   
Added: 24th April 2011
Views: 1479
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Klaatu my alter ego We could use a guy like klaatu in the government
Tags: DTESS  SCI  FI  at  its  best 
Added: 26th April 2011
Views: 1318
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Posted By: collincd
Florence Sally Horner Abduction Case Florence Horner was the victim of a little-known case of child abduction from the 1940s. Had it happened today, it would surely be a media sensation. In 1948, as part of a club initiation, 11-year-old Florence Sally Horner stole a five-cent notebook from a dime store in Camden, NJ. Frank La Salle, a 50-year-old mechanic, witnessed the theft and saw a perverted opportunity: He told Horner he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to 'a place for girls like you' if she didn't co-operate with him. La Salle abducted Horner and spent 21 months travelling with her through different American states all the while using Horner as his sex slave. LaSalle posed as Horner's father on their travels, even going as far as enrolling Horner in local schools. While attending school in Dallas, she confided her situation to a classmate. Later she escaped from La Salle and phoned her sister at home, asking her to 'send the FBI.' La Salle was arrested at a California motor court but claimed he was Florence's father. However, an FBI investigation found that Horner's true father had died seven years previously. La Salle was sentenced under the Mann Act to 30 to 35 years in prison. Literary scholars believe the Horner case at least partially inspired Vladimir Nabokov's famous novel Lolita. In fact, there is a reference to the Horner case in Part II, Chapter 33 of the novel. Nabokov also uses the adjective 'Florentine' to describe Lolita--likely an allusion to Florence Horner. Like the fictional Lolita, Florence Horner died young: She was killed in a car accident near Woodbine, New York, on August 18, 1952. Two days later the Associated Press reported, 'Florence Sally Horner, a 15-year-old Camden, N.J., girl who spent 21 months as the captive of a middle-aged morals offender a few years ago, was killed in a highway accident when the car in which she was riding plowed into the rear of a parked truck.'
Tags: kidnapping  Lolita  Florence  Sally  Horner 
Added: 11th May 2011
Views: 3572
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Posted By: Lava1964

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