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1964 Hairstyles Here is the brunette Colleen Corby in the August 1964 issue of Seventeen magazine to remind us all of what a girl had to suffer before she could create her hairdo! Ouchie! Whether you used these brush hair rollers or orange juice cans for curlers, sleeping in these was a chore, not to mention a pain. Anything for beauty, right? But once you got the important stuff out of the way, like rolling up your hair, THEN you could concentrate on your chemistry homework and fidget with your slide rule, a portable mechanical analog computer. To sum it up, today we use handheld electronic calculators; But women STILL go to great lengths and pains for their hairstyles!
Tags: 1964  hairstyles  ColleenCorby  SeventeenMagazine  slideruler  hairdos  pain  suffering  beauty  VintageMagazines     
Added: 26th June 2011
Views: 1945
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Oakland As Mustache Gang 1972 Nineteenth-century baseball players regularly sported mustaches. After the turn of the twentieth century, though, most ballplayers were clean shaven. By 1914 only one MLB player--Wally Schang--had facial hair. For the next 58 years, there were no mustachioed players in MLB. In 1972 Reggie Jackson showed up for the Oakland A's spring training camp with a mustache. A's owner Charlie Finley and manager Dick Williams both hated it. The more they insisted that Jackson shave it off, the more defiant he became. Finley then attempted some reverse psychology: He figured if he encouraged other A's players to grow mustaches, Jackson's sense of individuality would be defeated and he'd voluntarily shave his mustache. The plan backfired. After several players starting growing mustaches, Finley started to like the new look of his team and the publicity that came with it. He completely switched gears and offered a $300 bonus to anyone who had grown a mustache by Father's Day. In fact, Finley began pressuring his players to have mustaches. To a man, everyone on the A's roster agreed--including ultra-conservative manager Williams. The As long-haired, mustachioed look would stamp them with an identity starkly different from the rest of Major League Baseball. Relief pitcher Rollie Fingers (shown here) became the most noteworthy Oakland player with a mustache. His agreement to sport stylish facial hair was included in his contract--along with a $100 annual stipend for mustache wax.
Tags: baseball  Oakland  A 
Added: 27th July 2011
Views: 2600
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Ropers - Disastrous Spinoff Three's Company was a big it for ABC when it debuted in March 1977. Risque for its time due to its frequent sexual innuendos, the show was about a single male who was permitted to share an apartment with two single females as long as he pretended to be gay to placate the landlords. By the 1977-78 season, it was the #3 show on American TV. Accordingly, someone at ABC thought a sitcom centered on the show's landlords--the Ropers--was bound to be a hit. Audra Lindley, who played Helen Roper, liked the idea. Norman Fell, who played uptight Stanley Roper, wasn't so sure. He was quite content being a secondary character on a hit show and thought a spinoff was a big career risk. Nevertheless The Ropers premiered on Tuesday, March 13, 1979 to a very high initial rating, and it did moderately well in the ratings for the rest of the TV season. Then, in the fall of 1979, The Ropers was moved from its Tuesday time slot to Saturday where it competed head-to-head against NBC's popular CHIPS. The show's viewers failed to make the transition. Moreover, the Ropers never attracted the targetted young demographic. After 28 episodes The Ropers was yanked. By that time, Lindley and Fell had their roles as landlords on Three's Company decisively replaced by the popular Don Knotts. They made one cameo appearance and vanished from the show. Norman Fell's fears had come true. The Ropers regularly appears on TV fans' and critics' lists of the worst spinoffs ever.
Tags: television  The  Ropers  spinoff 
Added: 30th July 2011
Views: 1892
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tony Randall Late-Life Fatherhood Controversy Tony Randall, the actor most famous for his TV role as fastidious Felix Unger on The Odd Couple, created a stir in 1997 when he announced that his second wife Heather, 25, was expecting a child. Randall was 77 years old at the time. His first marriage of 50 years, ending with his wife Florence's death in 1992, produced no children. Randall's situation was an oddity: U.S. birth statistics indicate that only about one-tenth of one percent of American children are fathered by men over 60 years old, much less someone nearing 80. Randall learned of the stork's impending visit in 1996, while rehearsing for a production of A Christmas Carol in New York City. Randall was giddily anticipating becoming a father despite his advanced age. What I look forward to, he said, is when the kid is 15 and we go out in the yard to play ball. Ill only be 90. (Tony's arithmetic was a little bit off the mark.) But Randall never made it to 90. He was 84 when he died in 2004, leaving behind not only a 7-year-old daughter, Julia, but also a 6-year-old son, Jefferson. The mere fact that Randall was becoming a first-time father as a septuagenarian bothered a lot of people. They complained that although Randall was financially well off, he was virtually guaranteeing his children would be fatherless at an early age. Sociologists' opinions varied. Some claimed that lower testosterone in elderly men made them better suited for parenthood because they were more nurturing. Others suggested Randall was being selfish at the expense of his children's well-being. Still others maintaned it was only the business of the Randall family. After Randall's death, his widow admitted in an interview with Larry King that she had not adequately prepared her children for the likelihood of their father dying while they were young.
Tags: fatherhood  Tony  Randall  controversy 
Added: 20th August 2011
Views: 5446
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Posted By: Lava1964
The New Odd Couple - 1982 Sitcom Flop In 1982 ABC tried to resurrect The Odd Couple. It had run on that network from 1970 to 1975 with the familiar and popular duo of Jack Klugman and Tony Randall. This time ABC tried it with a black twosome in the leading roles: Demond Wilson (who starred on Sanford and Son from 1972 to 1977) played sloppy sportswriter Oscar Madison. Ron Glass (who starred on Barney Miller from 1975 to 1982) played fussy fashion photographer Felix Unger. While the show was billed as the "new" version of The Odd Couple, seven of the series' first 13 scripts were merely recycled versions of the 1970s episodes. Viewers didn't like the the show at all: The New Odd Couple lasted just 16 episodes before being yanked off the air.
Tags: TV  New  Odd  Couple  flop  sitcom  rehash 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 602
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ball Four - Sitcom Flop 1976 Ball Four was a situation comedy that aired on CBS in 1976. The series was inspired by the tremendously successful 1970 book of the same name by Jim Bouton. Bouton co-created the show with humorist and television critic Marvin Kitman and sportswriter Vic Ziegel. Bouton also starred in the series. Ball Four followed the Washington Americans, a fictitious minor league baseball team, dealing with the fallout from a series of Sports Illustrated articles written by Americans' player Jim Barton (Bouton). Like the book, the series covered controversial subjects including womanizing players, drug use, homosexuality in sports, and religion. The series included a gay rookie ballplayer--one of the earliest regular gay characters on television. The creative trio began developing the series in 1975, looking to groundbreaking series like M*A*S*H and All in the Family as models. CBS expressed interest and the creative team developed a script. CBS shot the pilot episode and ultimately bought the series. Ball Four aired at 8:30 PM Eastern time, which was during the Family Viewing Hour, an FCC-mandated hour of early evening "family-friendly" broadcasting. Consequently the writers had some trouble with the network's Standards and Practices in their attempt to portray realistic locker room scenes, especially the language used by the players. Pseudo-profanity such as "bullpimp" was disallowed, while "horse-crock" and "bullhorse" were approved. Ball Four debuted on September 22, 1976. Critics panned the series. One of the more charitable reviews called it "uneven in quality." CBS cancelled Ball Four after just five episodes.
Tags: sitcom  Ball  Four  baseball  CBS 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 581
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Posted By: Lava1964
1963 Guns and Fashions Fashions from the May 1963 issue of Seventeen magazine features guns and death. These are Lee jeans to die for. Wild Sixties colors that zing and swing. Colors, the copy tells us, loaded with enough yippie to bring the sheriff out shooting. Lock up the horses? Huh? LOL We have not seen jeans like these since!
Tags: 1963  Teen  Fashions  SeventeenMagazine  jeans  Sixties     
Added: 25th August 2011
Views: 959
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Hedy Lamar - Brains and Beauty Hedy Lamar combined brains and beauty. Her flight to America would make an excellent movie! Hedy was born in Austria in 1916. At age 17 - in the 1933 Czech film Ecstasy - she appeared in a steamy love scene, and swam nude in a 10 minute onscreen sequence. Ecstasy was banned in America for being indecent. At 19, her parents gave her into an arranged marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. She attended hundreds of parties as his trophy wife, mingling many times with Hitler and Mussolini, and lived in the Salzberg castle where The Sound of Music was later filmed. Hedy's husband was a control freak, and she fled him in dramatic fashions. In her first attempt, with her husband chasing her, she hid in a brothel. In desperation, with her husband stalking the halls of the brothel, she actually serviced a customer during her attempt to hide. In a later, successful escape, Hedy hired a maid who looked like her. She drugged the maid, donned her uniform, exited by the service entrance, and made her way to London. In some versions of this story, she escaped during a party, taking most of her jewels with her. Hedy later boarded a ship for America, and Louis B. Mayer signed her to a studio contract while en route to America, and still aboard ship. She must have been brilliant. While in America, Hedy co-invented a system of switching frequencies which is still used by the U.S. military to control some missiles. It's principles are also used in wireless internet technology, and in many cellphones. She got the idea while playing piano duets with her co-inventor: composer George Antheil. She would follow Antheil on the piano as he - switching from key to key and rhythm to rhythm - attempted both to throw her off, and to create interesting interplay.
Tags: actress  Hedy  Lamar 
Added: 25th August 2011
Views: 1211
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Posted By: Lava1964
Holmes and Yo-Yo - Sitcom Flop 1976 Holmes & Yo-Yo was a disastrous, far-fetched sitcom that aired on ABC for 13 episodes during the 1976-1977 season. The series followed luckless Detective Alexander Holmes (whose partners always seem to get killed in the line of duty) and his new android partner Yo-Yo, on their adventures and misadventures. Meanwhile Holmes taught Yo-Yo how to be human while trying to keep his quirky partner's true nature a secret. The show was produced by Leonard Stern, a former staff writer for Get Smart--which featured an android character named Hymie who was a prototype for Yo-Yo. Richard B. Shull starred as Detective Holmes. John Schuck starred as his partner Gregory "Yo-Yo" Yoyonivich. Co-stars were Andrea Howard and Bruce Kirby. Jay Leno appeared in the pilot as a gas station attendant! The pilot episode introduced Detective Holmes as a down-on-his-luck veteran cop who constantly injures his partners. The department gives him a new partner, Gregory Yoyonivich. Yo-Yo, as he likes to be called, is good-natured, if a bit clumsy, and also surprisingly strong. During one of their first calls, Yo-Yo is shot and Holmes discovers his new partner is an android--a sophisticated new crime-fighting machine designed by the police department as their secret weapon on crime. "You're not a person!" is Holmes' stunned response. Besides super-strength, Yo-Yo's other abilities were speed reading, and the ability to analyze clues at the scene. Yo-Yo had a built-in Polaroid camera: Each time his nose was pressed, a Polaroid photograph of his view would be taken and ejected from his shirt pocket. Yo-Yo's control panel was built into his chest, which could be opened by pulling his tie. The level of Yo-Yo's batteries was critical, because if they ran down his memory and, effectively, his being would be erased. In one episode his batteries came very close to running down completely, and he was charged by being pushed against an electric fence with his arms extended. Yo-Yo weighed 427 pounds, and his heavy build could absorb the shock of a bomb. Much comedy was derived from Yo-Yo's constant malfunctions. Some of his common problems included uncontrollably spinning head over heels when near an electric garage door that was opening or closing; bullets causing him to break out dancing; magnets flying at him; picking up radio signals from Sweden; and repeating "Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad" over and over when his circuits blew. Another running gag involved Yo-Yo's ability to read an entire book by simply fanning its pages; his invariable comment after doing so: "I enjoyed it!" The show premiered in September 1976 and was axed before Christmas.
Tags: Holmes  and  Yo-Yo  sitcom  ABC  flop 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 918
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mojud Stocking Ad Santa likes what he sees.
Tags: Santa  Mojud  stocking  ad 
Added: 1st September 2011
Views: 1203
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Posted By: Lava1964

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