Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Woodrow Wilson at the White House 1917 Footage from the National Archives depicts Wilson working in his White House office. Footage of sheep on the White House lawn; their wool was auctioned to raise money for World War I. He suffered a massive stroke on this date, October 2nd 1919 leaving him partially paralyzed.
Tags: Woodrow  Wilson  at  the  White  House  1917 
Added: 2nd October 2008
Views: 1386
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Night Crawlers Any of you used to catch your Buy bait? We used to flood the lawn just before dusk. Then later that night go out with a flashlight and nail 10 12 dozen Nightcrawlers for fishing bait the next morning.
Tags: Yup! 
Added: 29th June 2010
Views: 1342
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Lawn Darts Remember Lawn Darts? Also known as Jarts or yard darts, they were a popular game at picnics and in backyards during the 1970s and into the 1980s. A typical set consisted of four to eight darts comprised of two different colors along with two plastic rings. The rings were placed a reasonable distance apart and served as targets for the darts. Rules varied from place to place, but the game was scored in a similar fashion to bocce or horseshoe-pitching. A game could be played as a one-on-one singles match or with partners. The metal tips were designed to dig into the lawn when they landed. Of course, they could also dig into somebody's flesh if the darts were thrown recklessly. In December 1988 the sale of the metal-tipped lawn darts was banned in the United States. Canada banned them the following year. Since then, safer forms of 'lawn darts' have proved to be very unpopular with consumers. Quality sets of the metal-tipped lawn darts are prized by collectors.
Tags: lawn  darts  recreation   
Added: 15th February 2011
Views: 6371
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Our Gang Publicity Photo - 1926 This is a group shot of the main players from the Our Gang comedies, circa 1926. From left to right are Joe Cobb, Mickey Daniels, Jackie Condon, Mary Kornman, Johnny Downs, and Jay R. Smith. The photograph was taken to promote the Western Weld Patch Repair, represented by the ball on which Mary Kornman is sitting. The man standing behind the Our Gang kids is Clarence E. Dunlop, president of Western States Manufacturing Company of Sioux City, IA. The ball was made to demostrate the company's patching process. You can see the strips of patch rubber running up and down the ball, which is eight feet in circumference. The ball was made from nine old tubes and Western Weld patches. The photograph was issued to dealers of Western States' products. The ball was first publicly shown at the Orange County Fair, with the Our Gang kids making a public appearance to promote the product. The photograph was taken on the lawn directly behind the Hal Roach Studios administration building, which you can see on the left. The big brick building in the back is one of the two stages that were at the studio at that time.
Tags: Our  Gang  comedies  photo  publicity 
Added: 19th May 2012
Views: 2865
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1973 Wimbledon Boycott In May 1973 Nikola (Niki) Pilic, Yugoslavia's number-one-ranked male tennis player, was suspended by his national tennis association. The governing body claimed he had refused to play in a Davis Cup tie for Yugoslavia against New Zealand earlier that month. Today tennis players routinely turn down invitations to play for their countries in Davis Cup competition, but back in 1973 it was considered a big no-no--especially in an eastern European country. Pilic denied he had done so. Be that as it may, Pilic was initially suspended for nine months. Yugoslavia's suspension was supported by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF), but it was later reduced to just one month. Nevertheless, that month happened to be when the prestigious Wimbledon championships took place. Thus, Pilic would not be permitted to play at Wimbledon. The recently formed men's players union, the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), stated that if Pilic was not allowed to compete, none of its membership should compete. As a result, 81 of the top players, including reigning champion Stan Smith, boycotted Wimbledon in 1973 to protest Pilic's suspension. The initial seeding for the men's draw had already taken place. Thirteen of the 16 men's seeds withdrew. This resulted in an enormous number of qualifiers and lucky losers getting into the main draw. Three leading ATP players, Ilie Nastase, Roger Taylor and Ray Keldie, defied the boycott and were fined by the ATP's disciplinary committee. Also among those who chose to play were two rising stars: Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors, who each advanced to the quarterfinals. Despite the boycott, the attendance of 300,172 was the second highest in Wimbledon's history at that time. The eventual men's champion was Jan Kodes of Czechoslovakia. He defeated Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union 6-1, 9-8, 6-3 in the final. (Tiebreakers were played at 8-8 in those days.) Kodes is shown here planting a kiss on the championship trophy.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  boycott 
Added: 15th September 2012
Views: 3393
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 2668
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random