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Most Inept Olympic Swimmer At the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia, some swimmers from developing countries were given wild card entries even though they were nowhere close to being world-class swimmers. The most famous of the bunch was 22-year-old Eric Moussambani of Equatorial Guinea. Nicknamed Eric the Eel by the British press, Moussambani had only learned to swim eight months earlier. Because there were no swimming pools in his country, Moussambani practised in a lake. He had never seen an Olympic-sized swimming pool until his memorable 100-metres freestyle heat. Moussambani's two rival competitors in his heat (Niger's Karim Bare and Tajikistan's Farkhod Oripov) were both disqualified for false starts, so Eric the Eel was on his own. Here's the clip of his heat--in which he clocked a glacial 1:52.72. The gold medallist in the men's 100-metres freestyle won the event in just 48.30 seconds.
Tags: Olympics  Equatorial  Guinea  Eric  Moussambani  swimmer 
Added: 16th February 2014
Views: 317
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Posted By: Lava1964
K-Tel Love Songs of the Seventies commercial 20 Full Length Hits! This was not available in stores, only through this special TV offer from Lakeshore Music! On record, 8-track or cassette.
Tags: commercial  k-tel  lp  records   
Added: 8th August 2009
Views: 1164
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Posted By: chrissiek
Henry Blake Killed On MASH Thirty-nine years ago today (March 18, 1975) one of the most memorable--and shocking--moments in American television was broadcast: In the final episode of the third season of MASH, Lt. Colonel Henry Blake, the commanding officer of the 4077th MASH in Korea, was killed while on his way home. McLean Stevenson had wanted to leave MASH after three seasons, so the show's writers used Stevenson's departure to make a powerful statement: some people go off to war and don't come back. Never before had a sitcom's character's death been so dramatically part of the script. Colonel Blake's death had always been part of the episode's script, but the final page had been hidden from the cast members in order to keep their reactions throughout the rest of the show true to the happy storyline of Blake returning home to his family in Bloomington, IN. Only when all the other scenes had been filmed did director Larry Gelbart inform the cast about the missing scene. This clip shows company clerk Radar O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff) interrupting an OR session to deliver the tragic news. After the show aired, CBS was inundated with hundreds of letters from viewers who were outraged that a situation comedy had become a situation tragedy. Every person who wrote a letter got a hand-written reply explaining that MASH wanted to show the cruel realities of war.
Tags: MASH  Colonel  Blake  death 
Added: 18th March 2014
Views: 379
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marilyn Bell Swims Lake Ontario On September 9, 1954, Canadian teenager Marilyn Bell became the first person to swim across Lake Ontario. Some 300,000 onlookers witnessed her arrival near the Canadian National Exhibition grounds in Toronto 20 hours and 59 minutes after Bell began her swim in Youngstown, NY. Bell's feat was actually made in defiance of CNE organizers who had offered a $10,000 prize solely to American marathon swimmer Florence Chadwick. (Chadwick abandoned her effort after becoming ill. The CNE did award Bell the cash.) The straight-line distance of the swim was about 32 miles. Bell, who was a month shy of her seventeenth birthday, swam an estimated 40 miles while battling fifteen-foot waves and lamprey eels. Bell later swam both the English Channel and the Strait of Juan de Fuca before retiring from marathon swimming in 1958.
Tags: Marilyn  Bell  Lake  Ontario  swimmer 
Added: 6th September 2009
Views: 1235
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fort Montgomery - Civil War Fort Ruins Fort Montgomery is on the New York side of Lake Champlain at Rouses Point, NY. The multi-cannoned fort was built to prevent a foreign power from sailing down the Northern Corridor waterway from Montreal to New York City. In the 1930's part of it was demolished for use as fill for a new bridge. Much of what remains is intact and is a fun, sometimes spooky, historic site to visit. Tours are now given. It will be featured on the History Channel in the near future. Its role in defining and protecting our homeland borders will be emphasized.
Tags: Fort  Rouses  Point  Civil  War  Tour    Champlain 
Added: 31st October 2009
Views: 597
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Posted By: Watersnake
NBC presents The Towering Inferno 1980 Casey Kasem provides the voice over narration as the disaster epic "The Towering Inferno" (directed by John Guillermin and produced by Irwin Allen) makes its network television debut on NBC in 1980.
Tags: movie  disaster  TV  television  network  NBC  promo  1980  1970s  1980s  towering  inferno  Paul  Newman  Steve  McQueen  William  Holden  Fred  Astaire  Robert  Wagner  Faye  Dunaway  Susan  Blakely  Casey  Kasem  Irwin  Allen 
Added: 14th November 2009
Views: 1276
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Posted By: robatsea
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 2149
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Probert passed away yesterday. Bob Probert played for the Detroit Red Wings in the late 80's early 90's. He was as they say an Enforcer on the ice. The Red Wings were just coming out of a 20 something year funk. He protected Steve Yezzerman and the others on his team. Only in Hockey can you do this, They sure loved here in The Motor City or I should say Hockeytown. 45 years old, very young. He was on his boat on Lake St Clair with his family when he collapsed. R.I.P Bob!
Tags: Bob  Probert  former  Detroit  Red  Wing 
Added: 6th July 2010
Views: 622
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Posted By: Marty6697
1916 New Jersey Shark Attacks During an 11-day period during a 1916 heatwave, five people were attacked by sharks along the coast of New Jersey. Only one victim survived. These well chronicled events inspired Peter Benchley's famous novel Jaws. The first attack occurred on Saturday, July 1 at Beach Haven, a resort town off New Jersey's southern coast. Charles Epting Vansant, 25, of Philadelphia was vacationing at the Engleside Hotel. Before dinner, Vansant decided to take a quick swim in the Atlantic. Shortly after entering the water, Vansant began shouting. He was rescued by lifeguard Alexander Ott who pulled the bleeding Vansant from the water. Vansant's left thigh had been stripped of its flesh. He bled to death on the hotel manager's desk. The second attack occurred 45 miles north of Beach Haven at the resort town of Spring Lake, New Jersey. The victim was Charles Bruder, 27, a hotel bellhop. Bruder was killed on Thursday, July 6, 1916, while swimming 130 yards from shore. A shark bit him in the abdomen and severed his legs. Lifeguards Chris Anderson and George White pulled Bruder into their canoe but he bled to death before they reached the shore. The next two attacks occurred on Wednesday, July 12. They shockingly took place in fresh water in Matawan Creek near the town of Matawan, 30 miles north of Spring Lake and 16 miles inland! Around 2 p.m. some local boys, including Lester Stillwell, 11, were playing in the creek at an area called the Wyckoff Dock. A dorsal fin appeared and the boys realized it was a shark. Before Stillwell could leave the creek, the shark pulled him underwater. Stillwell's friends ran to town for help. Several men, including local businessman Watson Stanley Fisher, 24, came to investigate. Fisher jumped into the creek to find Stillwell's body, but he too was attacked by the shark in front of several horrified witnesses. Fisher was pulled from the creek without recovering Stillwell's body. His right thigh was severely injured and he bled to death at Monmouth Memorial Hospital in Long Branch. Stillwell's body was recovered 150 feet upstream from the Wyckoff Dock on July 14. The fifth and final victim, Joseph Dunn, 14, of New York City was attacked a half mile from the Wyckoff Dock nearly 30 minutes after the attacks on Stillwell and Fisher. The shark bit his left leg, but Dunn was rescued by his brother and a friend after a vicious tug-of-war with the shark. Dunn was taken to Saint Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick. Dunn lost his leg, but otherwise recovered. There is some debate whether just one shark was responsible for all five attacks. However, there were no further attacks after a shark, that was found to have human bones in its stomach, was killed. What prompted the rash of attacks in 1916? One grisly theory is that Atlantic sharks had grown accustomed to feeding on humans after German submarine attacks.
Tags: shark  attacks  New  Jersey 
Added: 7th December 2010
Views: 2257
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hazel Christmas Tags: Hazel  Christmas,  Hazel  Burke,  Shirley  Booth,  George  Baxter,  Mr.  B,  Missy,  Whitney  Blake   
Added: 23rd December 2010
Views: 758
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Posted By: Cliffy

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