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Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd For a short time during the early 1940s, Lake was considered one of the most reliable box office draws in Hollywood and was also known for her onscreen pairings with actor Alan Ladd. At first, the couple was teamed together merely out of physical necessity: Alan Ladd was just 5 feet 5 inches tall and the only actress then on the Paramount lot short enough to pair with him was Veronica, who stood just 4 feet 11˝ inches. They made four films together: THIS GUN FOR HIRE, THE GLASS KEY, THE BLUE DAHLIA, and SAIGON. . i love this black and white photo of them!
Tags: veronica  lake  alan  ladd  this  gun  for  hire  the  glass  key  the  blue  dahlia  saigon 
Added: 19th September 2007
Views: 1518
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Posted By: Teresa
Andy Williams Passes At Age 84 Andy Williams died Tuesday at his home in Branson, Mo. He was 84. Williams, who had been battling bladder cancer, had divided in time in recent years between La Quinta, Calif., and Branson, where he owned the Moon River Theater — named after the song that had been his signature since 1962.
Tags: Andy  Williams  Branson,  Mo  bladder  cancer  Moon  River  Theater     
Added: 26th September 2012
Views: 1198
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Posted By: Cliffy
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2275
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1582
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Posted By: Lava1964
Remembering Those Groovy  70s Remember Shaun Cassidy, Leif Garrett, Parker Stevenson, David Cassidy, John Travolta, Ryan O Neal, Roger Moore, Lee Majors, Jan Michael Vincent, Clint Eastwood, Richard Gere, Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, Dustin Hoffman, Farrah Fawcett, Jaclyn Smith, Cheryl Ladd, Kate Jackson, Dana Plato, Olivia Newton John, Melissa Gilbert, Carrie Fisher, Rex Smith, Elton John, England, John Ford Coley, Billy Joel, Donna Summers, Karen Carpenter, Diana Ross, Donnie & Marie Osmonds, Air Supply, Genesis, The Eagles, Aerosmith, Queen, Bee Gees, Led Zeppelin, Different Strokes, Starsky & Hutch, Chips, Wonder Woman, Grease, Rocky, Jaws, Dirty Harry, Superman, The Muppet Show, Tom & Jerry, Sesame Street and so many more..
Tags: remembering  those  groovy  70s 
Added: 3rd January 2008
Views: 3651
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Posted By: Babs64
Vintage Ambient Advertising For Womens Stockings From the 1920s i HATE when my stockings ladder!
Tags: durasil      vintage      ad 
Added: 6th May 2009
Views: 1070
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Posted By: Teresa
Cheryl Ladd Think It Over She did have a brief singing career in the late 70's and I belive this one peaked at # 36.
Tags: Cheryl  Ladd  Think  It  Over 
Added: 23rd July 2009
Views: 1807
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Posted By: Carl1957
Good Times - Death of James Evans Fans of the 1970s sitcom Good Times will surely remember this jaw-dropping moment from the first episode of the 1976-77 season: The Evans family is seemingly on its way up the financial ladder when father James gets a good-paying job in Mississippi. The family throws a farewell party for their Chicago friends before they depart. All is smiles and merriment...until they read the telegrams.
Tags: Good  Times  James  Evans  death 
Added: 25th March 2014
Views: 2823
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 4060
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nickelodeon Commercials December 11 1993 Nickelodeon Commercials December 11, 1993 1. "Looney Tunes" End Credits 2. Up Next... 3. Dimension Cable 4. Promo for "Rugrats: The Santa Experience" 5. Shark Attack (OMG I totally forgot about this) 6. Kirby's Pinball Land 7. Happy Chanukah Bumper 8. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 9. Lickin' Lizards (With Michelle Trachtenberg) 10. Baby Get Well (Yep, the cheeks of babies glow neon pink when they're feverish) 11. Huffy Dr. Shock (Dr. Shock is still recovering from his mental breakdown and is prohibited from working with bicycles per a court order) 12. Chuck E. Cheese's 13. Alpha-Bits 14. Barbie Golden Dreams Motorhome 15. Barbie Fountain Pool 16. Promo for "Muppet Babies" 17. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers 18. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 19. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Tournament Fighters (Am I watching a video game commercial or some weird music video for an alternative band?) 20. Kirby's Dreamland (As the owner of a Game Gear, I sort of missed out on the whole Kirby thing) 21. Apple Jacks (With Devin Ratray aka Buzz from the "Home Alone" movies) 22. Station ID (Awesome) 23. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 24. Aladdin Gift Set 25. Sally Secrets (So she hides stickers in her prosthetic feet? Neat) 26. X-Men Video Pack at Pizza Hut (That poster is amazing) 27. Stack-a-saurus Nex (I forgot so many of these cheesy electronic board games) 28. Eat At Ralph's (Vomitastic!) 29. Power Wheels Barbie Lamborghini (While watching her spoiled, delusional child drive around the block, little Cindy's mother thought to herself, "What sort of monster have I created?") 30. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 31. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers
Tags: Nickelodeon  Commercials  December  11  1993 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2864
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Posted By: masonx31

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