Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Electric Days Electric Nights Another classic musical performance from a 60's sitcom. From 1969, Jeannie's wicked lookalike sister Jeannie II trails Tony (Larry Hagman) to the Cocoa Beach Cabana. In her efforts to win Tony's affections, Jeannie II also replaces the nightclub's regular singer and renders this seductive ballad.
Tags: i  dream  of  jeannie  barbara  eden  larry  hagman  60s  sitcoms 
Added: 5th November 2007
Views: 2740
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Americas Sweetheart at 61 Happy Birthday to Sally Field! Sally is the daughter of actress Margaret Field and step-father Jock Mahoney, also an actor as well as a stuntman. Sally managed to finish high school, but early on it was clear she would follow in her parents' footsteps, and she soon got the lead role in the 1965 TV series "Gidget", quickly followed by "The Flying Nun" which ran from 1967-1970. American was in love with her wholesome, girl-next-door persona. The role that got Sally noticed as a more serious dramatic actress, was her portrayal of the title character in the TV movie Sybil, a woman suffering from a multiple personality disorder. The part won her an Emmy in the Best Actress category in 1976. Hollywood now saw Sally Field as more than just a pretty face. She had raw talent they were more than happy to exploit. But Sally didn't altogether abondon her comedic side and proved this by starring opposite Burt Reynolds in the two Smokey And The Bandit films. Nevertheless, her best work came through in dramatic roles, and Sally went on to win Oscars in the Best Actress category for both Norma Rae and Places In The Heart. Aside from acting, she has also produced and directed several projects for television, including directing an episode of the acclaimed mini-series, From The Earth To The Moon. Sally has two sons from her first marriage, Peter and Eli. And Samuel, from her second marriage.
Tags: sally  field  gidget  flying  nun  norma  rae  sybil  actresses 
Added: 5th November 2007
Views: 1980
Rating:
Posted By: Guido
Rosie the Riveter Here are some great photos from the Library of Congress. I first heard about this when I was a kid, from my mom, who worked as a riveter for an aircraft plant during WWII. Rosie was an actual person, a riveter from Kentucky who represented the six million women who worked in the manufacturing plants that produced munitions and material during World War II. These women took the places of the male workers who were absent fighting in the Pacific and European theaters. The character is now considered a feminist icon in the US, and a herald of women's economic power to come. Rosie and her slogan were featured on posters, magazines, and more. These hard working women were paid a whopping $31.21 a week compared to men who brought home $54.65. Now....over 60 years later we're still fighting for equal pay!
Tags: rosie  the  riveter 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 2487
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
20th Century Boy Marc Bolan And T-Rex. Always in the Charts during the Glam rock era. His songs still carry over from that time and pop up in the most unexpected places, like in the movies or ads for this or that. Yes I was a fan !
Tags: Marc  Bolan  T  Rex  Glam  Rock  Unforgetable   
Added: 1st January 2008
Views: 1434
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
Featured Member- Lava1964 I was born in a small Canadian city in 1964. I am unmarried. Miss Right has not yet come along. I'm beginning to think she never will. As a kid, I loved acquiring knowledge on a variety of topics, hence my love of trivia. My father got me interested in history by making me watch documentaries when I was eight years old. I am truly grateful he did this. I developed my own passion for sports history. My favorite sports are baseball, boxing, tennis, hockey, football, and soccer. Baseball is far and away my favorite. I live and die with the exploits of the Boston Red Sox. (I was a Red Sox fan long before it became fashionable.) I played fastpitch softball as a kid when that was a popular pastime in Canada. I was a second baseman: Good glove, weak arm, decent contact hitter, not much power. I normally batted second. I have been a softball umpire since 1978. Last time I counted, I had worked over 2,300 games. I've always loved words and the English language. Its possibilities are truly limitless. I modestly say I am a writer of some repute. I began writing pieces for sports encyclopedias at age 19 and really haven't stopped penning sports articles since then. I used to write a weekly sports nostalgia column for a local newspaper. I allegedly had half a million readers at one time. (My column ran for five years before a dim-witted editor took over the sports department and dismissed all the freelance columnists and replaced them with hand-picked toadies. Accordingly, I have put a curse on him and his family. I've had three books on baseball history published. All have received kind reviews. I still write the occasional piece for nostalgia publications. If anyone is really interested in my stuff, I sell collections of my columns on demand. My books are available through mail order from my publisher in North Carolina. I am a tournament Scrabble player and official. I have an expert rating (which I am quite proud of) and I'm usually ranked in the top 40 in Canada. I help run a local club and local tourneys, and, for some reason, I am much in demand to officiate and organize tournaments in many places. Scrabble has allowed me to travel to Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, New Orleans, and this summer...Orlando. It's nice work if you can get it. It must be my aptitude for organization which I acquired from both my parents. Scrabble is quite a diverse and odd subculture. Nevertheless, my best friends are Scrabble players. The game helps me retain what is left of my sanity. Along those same lines, I enjoy all competitive endeavors. I always play to win. This is why I love game shows too, I suppose. Occasionally I do real jobs too. I've been a private tutor since 1994. My students think I'm brilliant. I always try to live up to their expectations. I think I have a good sense of humor. It's a hybrid of American and British mirth. I especially love puns. I am cuddly.
Tags: Featured  Member-  Lava1964 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1851
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
 Come Go With Me Remember the Del Vikings? They were noted for being one of the few racially integrated musical groups to attain success in the 1950's. The group was formed in 1955 by Clarence E. Quick, Kripp Johnson, Don Jackson, Samuel Paterson, and Bernard Robertson, who were all enlisted in the USAF and stationed in Pittsburgh PA. Because all of the members were in the service, they constantly ran the risk of being disrupted by members being stationed in other places. This happened soon after the group's forming when Paterson and Robertson were sent to Germany. They were replaced by baritone David Lerchey, the group's first white member, and tenor Norman Wright. Originally signed to Fee Bee Records (1957), their first hit came in 1957, with the Wright-led 'Come Go with Me'. Soon after, Jackson was out, and was replaced by Gus Backus, the group's second white member. The group quickly found itself in greater demand following the release of 'Come Go with Me', which propelled the group into the Top 10 on Billboard's Top 100. They split up in 1965, but were back in 1970 with a near original lineup, Clarence Quick, Kripp Johnson, Norman Wright, Dave Lerchey, and William Blakely. Although a couple of members died over the years, the Del Vikings were featured on the PBS special KPBS Doo Wop Show in 1999, which is when this performance was filmed.
Tags: del  vikings  come  go  with  me  50s  rock  and  roll  kpbs  doo  wop  show 
Added: 17th February 2008
Views: 1941
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Werner Klemperer Interview Werner Klemperer (Colonel Klink from Hogan's Heroes) is interviewed by Pat Sajak on the latter's short-lived talk show. Pat replaces Werner's beloved souvenir monocle which had recently been stolen. Aw!
Tags: Werner  Klemperer  Pat  Sajak 
Added: 4th March 2008
Views: 2850
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
O Canada CBC Signoff Today (July 1) is Canada Day! Canada is now 141 years old. Allow me a little leeway to show my national pride. This is a pretty cool clip. It's the signoff which CBC Television used to conclude its broadcasting day. It blends O Canada with some native music while showcasing some of Canada's people, places, and natural beauty.
Tags: CBC  O  Canada 
Added: 1st July 2008
Views: 3131
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vintage Tap Shoes Lava's clip of Eleanor Powell reminded me of an old pair of tap shoes that i had as a kid . . Mom got me to take tap dancing lessons . . the only thing i remember were the ribbon laces . . why this would make an impression on me is a mystery . .
Tags: vintage        tap      shoes 
Added: 13th July 2008
Views: 2652
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Krakatoa Erupts 1883 The beginning of the amazing events at Krakatoa in 1883 date to May 20 when there were initial rumblings and venting from the volcano, which had been dormant for about 200 years. Over the next three months, there were regular small blasts from Krakatoa out of three vents. On August 11, ash started spewing from the small mountain. Eruptions got progressively stronger until August 26, when the catastrophe began. At noon, the volcano sent an ash cloud 20 miles into the air and tremors triggered several tsunamis. This turned out to be just a small indication, however, of what would follow the next day. For four-and-a-half hours beginning at 5:30 a.m. on August 27, there were four major and incredibly powerful eruptions. The last of these made the loudest sound ever recorded on the planet. It could be heard as far away as central Australia and the island of Rodrigues, 3,000 miles from Krakatoa. The air waves created by the eruption were detected at points all over the earth. The eruption had devastating effects on the islands near Krakatoa. It set off tremendous tsunamis that overwhelmed hundreds of villages on the coasts of Java and Sumatra. Water pushed inland several miles in certain places, with coral blocks weighing 600 tons ending up on shore. At least 35,000 people died, though exact numbers were impossible to determine. The tsunamis traveled nearly around the world--unusually high waves were noticed thousands of miles away the next day. The volcano threw so much rock, ash and pumice into the atmosphere that, in the immediate area, the sun was virtually blocked out for a couple of days. Within a couple of weeks, the sun appeared in strange colors to people all over the world because of all the fine dust in the stratosphere. Over the ensuing three months, the debris high in the sky produced vivid red sunsets. In one case, fire engines in Poughkeepsie, New York, were dispatched when people watching a sunset were sure that they were seeing a fire in the distance. Further, there is speculation that Edvard Munch's 1893 painting "The Scream" depicting a psychedelic sunset may have actually been a faithful rendering of what Munch saw in Norway in the years following the eruption of Krakatoa. The amount of dust in the atmosphere also filtered enough sun and heat that global temperatures fell significantly for a couple of years. Krakatoa was left only a tiny fraction of its former self. However, in the intervening years, a small island, Anak Krakatoa ("Son of Krakatoa") has arisen from the sea. It is growing at an average of five inches every week. This island is receiving a great deal of scientific attention, as it represents a chance to see how island ecosystems are established from scratch.
Tags: History 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 1057
Rating:
Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel

Pages: [1] 2 3 of 3 | Random