Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Rush Limbaugh  aka DJ Jeff Christie 1971 Tags: Jeff    Christy    Rush    Limbaugh    WIXY    Radio    McKeesport    EIB    Top    40    1970s    1971    1972    Dee    Jay    Disc    Jockey    TubeNumber1     
Added: 29th March 2009
Views: 9861
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Featured Member- rickfmdj aka Rick DJ Ricky B from Chicago, Illinois. Rick has been a professional disc jockey for over 20 years. Rick’s career started as music director at his high school radio station and moved on through college radio as and radio engineer & on-air personality, obtaining a 4-hour air shift at a Chicago area radio station to becoming a member of the DJ Hot-Mix 12 in Chicago. From then Rick has opened & preformed at nightclubs, on radio and currently a Master of Ceremonies and Mobile Entertainer. Rick loves YRT and has told countless people of the site. Keep up the great job Steve!
Tags:  
Added: 20th March 2009
Views: 2079
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Country Superstar Eddy Arnold dies at 89 Eddy Arnold, whose mellow baritone on songs like 'Make the World Go Away', made him one of the most successful country singers in history, died this morning May 6,2008, days short of his 90th birthday. Arnold died at a care facility near Nashville. His wife of 66 years, Sally, had died in March, and in the same month, Arnold fell outside his home, injuring his hip. Arnold's vocals on songs like the 1965 "Make the World Go Away," one of his many No. 1 country hits and a top 10 hit on the pop charts, made him one of the most successful country singers in history. Folksy yet sophisticated, he became a pioneer of "The Nashville Sound," also called "countrypolitan," a mixture of country and pop styles. His crossover success paved the way for later singers such as Kenny Rogers. "I sing a little country, I sing a little pop and I sing a little folk, and it all goes together," he said in 1970. He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1966. The following year he was the first person to receive the entertainer of the year award from the Country Music Association. The reference book "Top Country Singles 1944-1993," ranked Arnold the No. 1 country singer in terms of overall success on the Billboard country charts. It lists his first No. 1 hit as "It's a Sin," 1947, and for the following year ranks his "Bouquet of Roses" as the biggest hit of the entire year. Other hits included "Cattle Call,""The Last Word in Lonesome Is Me,""Anytime,""Bouquet of Roses,""What's He Doing in My World?""I Want to Go With You,""Somebody Like Me,""Lonely Again" and "Turn the World Around." Most of his hits were done in association with famed guitarist Chet Atkins, the producer on most of the recording sessions. The late Dinah Shore once described his voice as like "warm butter and syrup being poured over wonderful buttermilk pancakes." Reflecting on his career, he said he never copied anyone. 'I really had an idea about how I wanted to sing from the very beginning,' he said. He revitalized his career in the 1960s by adding strings, a controversial move for a country artist back then. 'I got to thinking, if I just took the same kind of songs I'd been singing and added violins to them, I'd have a new sound. They cussed me, but the disc jockeys grabbed it. ... The artists began to say, 'Aww, he's left us.' Then within a year, they were doing it!' Arnold was born May 15, 1918, on a farm near Henderson, Tenn., the son of a sharecropper. He sang on radio stations in Jackson, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., and St. Louis before becoming nationally known. His image was always that of a modest, clean-cut country boy. 'You cannot satisfy all the people,' he once said. 'They have an image of me. Some people think I'm Billy Graham's half brother, but I'm not. I want people to get this hero thing off their mind and just let me be me.'
Tags: eddy  arnold  countrypolitan  sound   
Added: 8th May 2008
Views: 1636
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
I Buried Paul On this day in 1969, The Beatles scored their 13th US No.1 album with 'Abbey Road'. The cover supposedly contained clues adding to the ‘Paul Is Dead’ phenomenon: Paul is barefoot and the car number plate ‘LMW 281F’ supposedly referred to the fact that McCartney would be 28 years old if he was still alive. ‘LMW’ was said to stand for ‘Linda McCartney Weeps. ’ And the four Beatles, represent; the priest (John, dressed in white), the Undertaker (Ringo in a black suit), the Corpse (Paul, in a suit but barefoot), and the Gravedigger (George, in jeans and a denim work shirt). for those of you too young to remember,rumors of Paul McCartney's death began to circulate in 1969, a time when the strained relationships among the Beatles were becoming public knowledge. Written versions of this story first appeared in college newspapers in the fall of 1969, but the precise origin of the rumor is unknown. The story caught fire with the public when it was broadcast by a radio station in Detroit. Russell Gibb, a disc jockey for WKNR-FM, received a strange phone call from someone who identified himself only as Tom. The caller told Gibb that Paul McCartney had died in 1966 and was then replaced by a lookalike. The Beatles had subsequently left clues on their albums about this deception. . Other Beatles album covers also contained clues, the caller claimed, and a few Beatles songs contained clues about Paul's death—including some that could only be deciphered when the records were played backwards! Gibb related the rumor of Paul's death on the air, which brought a strong reaction from listeners and the story spread rapidly after that.
Tags: Beatles  Abbey  Road  Paul  McCartney  John  Lennon  Ringo  Starr  George  Harrison 
Added: 1st November 2008
Views: 2077
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Get on Down and Party Disco music was all about fun. Unlike the protest movement songs of the 60s all people wanted to do was party and have fun, nothing more.
Tags: Disco  Dancing  Van  McCoy  Get  On  Down  and  Party  Studio  54  Xanadu  Olivia  Newtown  John  John  Travolta  Saturday  Night  Fever  Rick  James  Disco  Duck  Rick  Dees  Borat  Hillary  Clinton  Barrack  Obama  Earth  Wind  and  Fire  Star  Wars  Skate  Town  Roller  Boogie  Linda  Blair  Drag  Queens  70s  1970s  Donna  Pescow  Disc  Jockey  DJ  Cher  Village  People   
Added: 23rd May 2009
Views: 1997
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Pete Rose Jockey Underwear Ad 1977 Egad! This ad for Jockey underwear featuring baseball star Pete Rose appeared in Playboy magazine in 1977.
Tags: Pete  Rose  underwear  ad 
Added: 10th June 2009
Views: 13220
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Carlton Underwear Ad A few months ago I posted a Jockey underwear magazine ad from 1977 featuring Pete Rose. Here's another hideous ad from that series. This one features Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Steve Carlton. Would any male be caught dead in those undergarments?
Tags: Steve  Carlton  underwear  ad 
Added: 30th October 2009
Views: 3215
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5547
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 2032
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
WABC Radio last day of music For decades WABC dominated not just New York but the eastern seaboard with 50,000 watts of power. At noon, May 10, 1982 the "Musicradio" format ended and WABC became a news-talk station. The day the music died.
Tags: WABC  radio  music  radio  musicradio  top  40  disc  jockey  dj 
Added: 24th March 2013
Views: 1348
Rating:
Posted By: Steve

Pages: [1] 2 of 2 | Random