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Jan and Dean Surf City Video Jan Berry and Dean Torrence, both born in Los Angeles, began singing together as a duo after football practice at University High School. They first performed on stage as The Barons at a high school dance. Their first commercial success was "Jennie Lee" (1958), a top 10 ode to a local, Hollywood, Ca, burlesque performer that Jan Berry recorded with fellow Baron Arnie Ginsburg. "Jan & Arnie" released three singles in all. After Torrence returned from a stint in the army reserves, Jan Berry and Dean Torrence began to make music as "Jan and Dean". Jan and Dean's commercial peak came between 1963 and 1966, as the duo scored an impressive sixteen Top 40 hits on the Billboard and Cash Box magazine charts, with a total of twenty-six chart hits over eight years. Jan and Brian Wilson collaborated on roughly a dozen hits and album cuts for Jan and Dean, including the number one national hit "Surf City" in 1963. Subsequent top 10 hits included "Drag City" (1963), "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena" (1964), and the eerily portentous "Dead Man's Curve" (1964). On April 12,1966, Berry received severe head injuries in a motor vehicle accident, ironically just a short distance from Dead Man's Curve in Los Angeles, two years after the song had become a hit. He was angry while driving because he had learned he was to be inducted into the military when had already completed two years of medical school, which he had been secretly attending. Berry had also separated from his girlfriend of seven years. As a result of his accident, Jan and Dean did not perform again until the mid-1970s, after the release of the feature film Deadman's Curve in 1978, which opened the doors for Jan and Dean to launch a successful and amazing comeback especially for Jan Berry. On February 3, 1978, CBS aired a made-for-TV movie about the duo entitled Deadman's Curve. The biopic starred Richard Hatch as Jan Berry and Bruce Davison as Dean Torrence, as well as appearances by Dick Clark, Wolfman Jack, and Mike Love and Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys. Following the release of the film, the duo made steps toward an official comeback that year, including touring with the Beach Boys. In the early 1980s, while Berry struggled to overcome drug addiction, Torrence toured briefly as "Mike & Dean," with Mike Love of the Beach Boys. But Berry got sober, beating the odds once again, and the duo reunited for good. Jan and Dean continued to tour on their own throughout the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new millennium with 1960s nostalgia providing them with a ready audience. On August 31, 1991, Berry married Gertie Filip at The Stardust Convention Centre in Las Vegas, Nevada. Torrence was Berry's best man at the wedding. Jan and Dean ended with Jan Berry's death on March 26, 2004, at the age of 62. Berry was an organ donor, and his body was cremated. On April 18, 2004, a "Celebration of Life" was held in Jan's memory at The Roxy Theatre on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California. Celebrities attending the event included Dean Torrence, Lou Adler, Jill Gibson, and Nancy Sinatra. Also present were many family members, friends, and musicians associated with Jan and Dean and the Beach Boys.
Tags: jan  and  dean  surf  city  video 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 5210
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Posted By: Sophia
Killer Turkey Now this is one big bird!
Tags: jennie  o  turkey  thanksgiving  commercials 
Added: 19th November 2007
Views: 1589
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Posted By: Babs64
Jan and Dean  Baby Talk Jan Berry and Dean Torrence first became friends on the football team at L.A.'s University High, but Dean's first success came with Arnie Ginsburg (not the Boston DJ the duo scored a big doo-wop hit as Jan and Arnie with 1958's "Jennie Lee." That song, actually written about a stripper, gained Berry some friends in the business, including Herb Alpert and producer Lou Adler. Together with friend Torrence, who'd just returned from an Army stint, they developed a song called "Baby Talk." It was a smash, but it wasn't until 1963, with the release of the Four Seasons' inspired "Linda," that the Jan and Dean sound began to take shape. After meeting the Beach Boys on the L.A. scene, Jan befriended leader Brian Wilson, and thw two began work on what would become "Surf City." Inspired by the local scene and Wilson's very recent hits, "Surfin'" and "Surfin' Safari" -- and benefiting from Berry's amazing self-taught production skills, it went straight to Number One. The duo of Jan and Dean flourished well into the mid-sixties, weathering even the British Invasion. But on April 12, 1966, Berry's Stingray slammed into a parked gardener's truck (not at the site mentioned in "Dead Man's Curve," despite legend), and Jan entered a decade-long nightmare of physical recovery, drug abuse, and depression. By the mid-Seventies, amazingly, Berry could perform almost at normal, and the duo began an amazing comeback that lasted well into the mid-Eighties. Berry passed away in 2004.
Tags: jan  and  dean  baby  talk  60s  rock  and  roll 
Added: 15th August 2008
Views: 1737
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Posted By: Naomi
NBC Week 1967 Tags: 1967  TV    NBC    The  Monkees    Man  From  U.N.C.L.E    The  Danny  Thomas  Hour    I  Spy    I  Dream  Of  Jennie    The  Jerry  Lewis  Show    The  Virginian    The  Kraft  Music  Hall    Run  For  Your  Life    Daniel  Boone    Ironside    Dragnet  1968    The  Dean  Martin  Show    Tarzan    Star  Trek    Accidental  Family    Get  Smart    The  Mothers-in-Laws    Bonanza    High  Chapparral     
Added: 23rd March 2010
Views: 2500
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Posted By: Old Fart
1912 British Olympic Womens Swim Team These four swimmers represented Great Britain at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. They won the gold medal in the 4 x 100 relay. My research says they are Belle Moore, Jennie Fletcher, Annie Speirs, and Irene Steer, although I don't know which one is which. (I don't know who the dour lady in the middle is. A chaperon or coach, perhaps? She looks like a million laughs.) Women's swimming made its debut in these 1912 Olympics. The British team's winning time was five minutes, 52.8 seconds. By comparison, the gold-medal-winning time of the Australian team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was three minutes, 52.69 seconds--more than two full minutes ahead of the 1912 pace. The entire 1912 Olympic swimming program was contested in just one day.
Tags: Olympics  swimming  British  women 
Added: 21st September 2010
Views: 4189
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dagmar - First Late-Night TV Star Anyone remember Dagmar? Dagmar Lewis (born Virginia Ruth in 1921) was an American actress, model and television personality of the 1950s. As a statuesque, busty blonde, she became the first major female star of television, receiving much press coverage during that decade. After her marriage to Angelo Lewis in 1941, she moved to New York where he was a naval officer. She adopted Jennie Lewis as her stage name (taken from her married name, Virginia Lewis). To keep busy, she became a fashion photographer's model--which got the buxom blonde noticed. Although she had no show business experience, she was cast in a Broadway musical revue, Laffing Room Only. In 1950, Lewis was hired by Jerry Lester as his sidekick for NBC's first late-night TV show: Broadway Open House (195052), the forerunner to The Tonight Show. Lester renamed her Dagmar. Billed as "a girl singer," she was instructed to wear a low-cut gown, sit on a stool, and play the role of a stereotypical dumb blonde. No one remembers her ever singing on the show. With tight sweaters displaying her curvy 5'8" figure (measuring 42"-23"-39"), her dim-bulb character was an immediate success, and the show emerged as a surprise hit for NBC. Dagmar soon attracted much more attention than Lester and showed that she was both bright and quick-witted when she appeared in sketches. Lester enjoyed making occasional jokes about her "hidden talents." Her personal appearances created a sensation, leading to much press coverage and a salary increase from $75 to $1,250 per week. With Dagmar getting all the attention, Lester walked off his own show in May 1951, and Dagmar carried on as the program's sole host. On July 16, 1951, she was featured on the cover of Life Magazine. However, Broadway Open House came to an end one month later. Undaunted, Dagmar became one of the leading personalities of early 1950s live television, doing sketch comedy on Milton Berle's Texaco Star Theater, The Bob Hope Show, and several other programs. In 1952, she hosted Dagmar's Canteen, a 15-minute program that aired at 12:15 a.m. on Saturday nights. She sang, danced, interviewed servicemen, and performed comedy, but the show was cancelled after just 12 weeks. She died a month before her 80th birthday in 2001.
Tags: Dagmar  bimbo  blonde  TV  starlet 
Added: 17th June 2012
Views: 7757
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Posted By: Lava1964

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