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John Carpenter Wins a Million Dollars Remember when Who Wants To Be A Millionaire was a huge ratings hit (before the producers ruined it with all those inane celebrity editions)? Well, if you do, you'll remember this famous final question when contestant John Carpenter calmly used his telephone lifeline to inform his dad he was about to win the jackpot. How cool was that?
Tags: John  Carpenter  Millionaire 
Added: 29th September 2007
Views: 4443
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 151
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jackpot Here's another 1970s game show I liked that didn't last too long: Jackpot. It aired on NBC from January 7, 1974 through September 26, 1975. Contestants had to solve riddles to win cash prizes. Geoff Edwards was the host. Sadly, only two episodes of this game show are known to exist on videotape!
Tags: Jackpot  NBC  game  show 
Added: 18th February 2009
Views: 1560
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dr Joyce Brothers Wins Game Show Jackpot Dr. Joyce Brothers is known for being a television personality, psychologist and newspaper columnist. However, she first gained national fame in late 1955 by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question--a quiz program on which she appeared as a boxing expert. Originally she had not planned to choose boxing as her topic. However, the show's sponsors thought it would be an attention-grabbing gimmick to have a female answer boxing questions, so she agreed. A voracious reader, Brothers studied every reference book about boxing that she could find; she would later tell reporters that her good memory allowed her to accrue a wealth of information about the sweet science--so much so that she had no difficulty with even the toughest questions. When the TV quiz show scandals broke in 1959, Brothers insisted that she had never cheated, nor had she ever been given any answers to questions in advance. Subsequent investigations verified that she had indeed won her jackpot honestly. (No contestant on The $64,000 Question was ever proven to have cheated.) Brothers' success on The $64,000 Question earned her a chance to be the color commentator for CBS during a middleweight title match between Carmen Basilio and Sugar Ray Robinson. She thus became the first woman ever to be a boxing announcer.
Tags: Dr  Joyce  Brothers  boxing  game  show 
Added: 22nd September 2011
Views: 1743
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Posted By: Lava1964
Get Smart TV Guide Cover 1967 Barbara Feldon and Don Adams of Get Smart grace this TV Guide cover from 1967. Get Smart was an extremely popular spy spoof that ran on NBC from 1965 to 1970 that pitted the counter-espionage activities of CONTROL versus the nefarious deeds of KAOS. The show introduced the phrase "would you believe..." into popular culture. The youthful looking Adams was ten years Feldon's senior. Adams won three consecutive Emmys playing Maxwell Smart (CONTROL agent 86). Feldon was nominated for two Emmys for her role as CONTROL agent 99. Adams was a WWII veteran who was the only survivor from a platoon that saw action on Guadalcanal. Feldon first gained fame by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question. Her subject was Shakespeare.
Tags: Get  Smart  Don  Adams  Barbara  Feldon 
Added: 22nd November 2011
Views: 1319
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jackpot - NBC Game Show Here's a short clip from the only known surviving episode of the original NBC version of the riddle-based game show Jackpot (which ran from January 1974 to September 1975). It aired on January 3, 1975 and shows the largest "super jackpot" ever won: $38,750. That was an enormous sum by game show standards of the time. Geoff Edwards was the host. Edwards' funky wardrobe was the brainchild of NBC executive Lin Bolen--much maligned for axing Jeopardy! and Concentration--who wanted her network to have "studly" game show hosts.
Tags: Jackpot  super  jackpot  Geoff  Edwards 
Added: 31st March 2013
Views: 1064
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bowling for Dollars Bowling for Dollars was a program that began in Baltimore in the 1960s and rapidly spread across the North American local TV landscape. Sports Illustrated once ran a story about the phenomenon. The show's concept was simple: Local bowlers tried to win a growing jackpot by rolling two consecutive strikes. If the jackpot wasn't won, it was increased for the next bowler. (If they didn't win the jackpot, contestants usually got paid a dollar per pin they knocked down.) Five-pin bowling is popular in Canada. In the version of Bowling for Dollars that aired on CKCO-TV in Kitchener, Ontario, three strikes were needed to win the jackpot--which was split with a lucky "pin pal" whose name was drawn from a Plexiglass drum of postcards sent in by viewers. The jackpot once reached a lofty $9,000. As many as nine different bowlers sometimes appeared on a 30-minute episode. Despite being low-budget and corny, Bowling for Dollars ran for a remarkable 24 years on CKCO-TV from 1971 to 1995. For most of its run, the show aired weeknights at 6:30 p.m.--right after the six o'clock news ended. This clip is likely from the early 1980s. Bill Inkol (who had the longest tenure as host) is the man holding the microphone.
Tags: Bowling  for  Dollars  Kitchener  CKCO-TV 
Added: 30th November 2013
Views: 1116
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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