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An Italian WWII Propaganda Poster Depicting American Bomber Pilots as Gansters Here's an Italian WWII poster portraying American pilots as "Flying Gansters". Those doity rats! Its ironic how the Axis committed henious acts against civilians of countries they invaded, but put out posters like this.
Tags: WWII  Axis  Italy  Posters  Propaganda 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 9045
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Timex Sinclair 1000 Computer Back in 1982 the Timex Corp. and Sinclair research (of Britain,) teamed up and produced the Timex Sinclair 1000. It was a low-priced introduction to home computers. It sported 2K of onboard RAM, (yes, 2K! 2 kilobytes of memory!) You could also purchase a 16K add-on memory module called a RAM Pack, (lower right in the picture,) which increased the memory to 18K. I believe there was also a 64K RAM Pack available later. The ones sold in Britain were known as the ZX 81. It had no display but you could hook it up to the VHF antenna connections on the back of your television set. It also didn't have any sound. The operating system was a modified version of the BASIC computer language and it gave a lot of people, including me, their first taste of computer programming. There were a number of programs that you could buy for it. They were all on cassette tapes. What you would do is connect the unit to your TV set, plug your cassette tape player into it and put whatever program you might have into the tape player. You had to turn the volume off on your cassette player because the programming code was just one continual screeching sound. I had a cassette tape that had a few different programs on it. All of the characters in the programs were block-headed type graphics, but they actually would walk across the screen and even jump up and down. Cool stuff back then. I remember this costing me $29, as the store I bought it at was getting rid of them. I believe the original selling price was $99. I also bought the 16K RAM Pack for $25. I've kept it all these years in good condition thinking that someday it would be worth something, and I was right. They're selling for about 10 bucks on eBay! Win a few, lose a few. Ironically, these things have somewhat of a cult following, and I've even heard of clubs dedicated to the TS-1000!
Tags: timex  sinclair  ts1000  computer 
Added: 4th September 2007
Views: 2463
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Tom Daschle Ad In light of the controversy surrounding taxes on the limo service that Tom Daschle got for free, this 1986 ad is ironic.
Tags: TomDaschleAd    Daschle    limousine     
Added: 4th February 2009
Views: 1218
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Posted By: pfc
Jan and Dean Surf City Video Jan Berry and Dean Torrence, both born in Los Angeles, began singing together as a duo after football practice at University High School. They first performed on stage as The Barons at a high school dance. Their first commercial success was "Jennie Lee" (1958), a top 10 ode to a local, Hollywood, Ca, burlesque performer that Jan Berry recorded with fellow Baron Arnie Ginsburg. "Jan & Arnie" released three singles in all. After Torrence returned from a stint in the army reserves, Jan Berry and Dean Torrence began to make music as "Jan and Dean". Jan and Dean's commercial peak came between 1963 and 1966, as the duo scored an impressive sixteen Top 40 hits on the Billboard and Cash Box magazine charts, with a total of twenty-six chart hits over eight years. Jan and Brian Wilson collaborated on roughly a dozen hits and album cuts for Jan and Dean, including the number one national hit "Surf City" in 1963. Subsequent top 10 hits included "Drag City" (1963), "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena" (1964), and the eerily portentous "Dead Man's Curve" (1964). On April 12,1966, Berry received severe head injuries in a motor vehicle accident, ironically just a short distance from Dead Man's Curve in Los Angeles, two years after the song had become a hit. He was angry while driving because he had learned he was to be inducted into the military when had already completed two years of medical school, which he had been secretly attending. Berry had also separated from his girlfriend of seven years. As a result of his accident, Jan and Dean did not perform again until the mid-1970s, after the release of the feature film Deadman's Curve in 1978, which opened the doors for Jan and Dean to launch a successful and amazing comeback especially for Jan Berry. On February 3, 1978, CBS aired a made-for-TV movie about the duo entitled Deadman's Curve. The biopic starred Richard Hatch as Jan Berry and Bruce Davison as Dean Torrence, as well as appearances by Dick Clark, Wolfman Jack, and Mike Love and Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys. Following the release of the film, the duo made steps toward an official comeback that year, including touring with the Beach Boys. In the early 1980s, while Berry struggled to overcome drug addiction, Torrence toured briefly as "Mike & Dean," with Mike Love of the Beach Boys. But Berry got sober, beating the odds once again, and the duo reunited for good. Jan and Dean continued to tour on their own throughout the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new millennium with 1960s nostalgia providing them with a ready audience. On August 31, 1991, Berry married Gertie Filip at The Stardust Convention Centre in Las Vegas, Nevada. Torrence was Berry's best man at the wedding. Jan and Dean ended with Jan Berry's death on March 26, 2004, at the age of 62. Berry was an organ donor, and his body was cremated. On April 18, 2004, a "Celebration of Life" was held in Jan's memory at The Roxy Theatre on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California. Celebrities attending the event included Dean Torrence, Lou Adler, Jill Gibson, and Nancy Sinatra. Also present were many family members, friends, and musicians associated with Jan and Dean and the Beach Boys.
Tags: jan  and  dean  surf  city  video 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 5093
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Posted By: Sophia
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2859
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Posted By: Lava1964
Camel Filters Cigarette Ad Am I the only one who finds this old commercial just a slight bit ironic??
Tags: Cigarettes  70 
Added: 17th January 2008
Views: 2372
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Posted By: Naomi
Drop Dead Cigarette Box You can't get any more unintentionally ironic than this 1956 magazine ad...the 'Drop Dead Cigarette Box' shaped like a coffin.
Tags: cigarette  box  ad 
Added: 2nd May 2008
Views: 1752
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ironic Steve Garvey SI Cover 'Is Steve Garvey Really Too Good To Be True?' asked the cover of Sports Illustrated in its 1982 baseball preview issue. Garvey, the Los Angeles Dodgers' popular first baseman, had spent years carefully cultivating a squeaky clean image that abruptly disintegrated the following year. He and wife Cyndy endured a scandalous public divorce in which Garvey's trysts with other women were exposed. Must have been that SI cover jinx!
Tags: Steve  Garvey  Si  cover 
Added: 20th February 2008
Views: 1432
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Posted By: Lava1964
Grand Hotel The cast included a series of top names: Greta Garbo, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Lewis Stone and Jean Hersholt; and, the film opens and closes with Lewis Stone's totally unaware statement: "Grand Hotel. People come and go. Nothing ever happens". The comment turns out to be ironic during the few days in which the plot unfolds, because everything seems to be happening at the hotel, from romance to robbery to an accidental death...
Tags: film      Grand  Hotel      Lionel  Barrymore      John  Barrymore      Joan  Crawford      Wallace  Berry      Lewis  Stone      Jean  Hersholt        Greta  Garbo      1932 
Added: 28th March 2008
Views: 1154
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Posted By: Teresa
KC and The Sunshine Band   Please Dont Go Please Don't Go" is a song recorded and released in 1979 on the KC and the Sunshine Band album Do You Wanna Go Party. The song was the band's first love ballad, in which the subject pleads obviously for a second chance. Ironically, shortly after the song's one-week run at number one, the group broke up and KC went solo. The song was the band's fifth and final number-one hit on Billboard Hot 100 charts
Tags: kc  sunshine,  please  dont  go 
Added: 19th March 2008
Views: 2338
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Posted By: rickfmdj

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