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The Irish Beauty  Maureen OHara Maureen O'Hara was born Maureen FitzSimons on August 17, 1920, in Ranelagh (a suburb of Dublin), Ireland. She loved playing rough athletic games as a child and excelled in sports. She combined this interest with an equally natural gift for performing. Charles Laughton, after seeing a screen test of Maureen, became mesmerized by her hauntingly beautiful eyes. Before casting her to star in Jamaica Inn (1939), Laughton and his partner, Erich Pommer, changed her name from Maureen FitzSimons to "Maureen O'Hara" - a bit shorter last name for the marquee.In her career Maureen starred with some of Hollywood's most dashing leading men, including Tyrone Power, John Payne, Rex Harrison, James Stewart, Henry Fonda, Brian Keith, Sir Alec Guinness and, of course, her famed pairings with "The Duke" himself, John Wayne. She starred in five films with Wayne, the most beloved being The Quiet Man (1952). Maureen O'Hara is still absolutely stunning, with that trademark red hair, dazzling smile and those huge, expressive eyes. She has fans from all over the world of all ages who are utterly devoted to her legacy of films and her persona as a strong, courageous and intelligent woman. Maureen has a list of all-time classics to her credit that include "The Hunchback of Notre Dame", How Green Was My Valley (1941), Miracle on 34th Street (1947), Sitting Pretty (1948), The Quiet Man (1952), The Parent Trap (1961) and McLintock! (1963). Add to this the distinction of being voted one of the five most beautiful women in the world and you have a film star who was as gorgeous as she was talented.
Tags: maureen  ohara  actresses 
Added: 27th September 2007
Views: 2938
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Posted By: Naomi
The National Police Gazette my grandmother loved all the old detective magazines . . i didn't realize at the time how risque they were! Here's a little history: "By far the most famous publication in the United States by this name was officially The National Police Gazette, although commonly referred to as simply the Police Gazette. It was founded in 1845 by George Wilkes, a journalist and sometime transcontinental railroad booster. The editor for most of the 19th century was Richard K. Fox, an immigrant from Ireland. Ostensibly devoted to matters of interest to the police, it was more often a tabloid-like publication, with lurid coverage of murders, Wild West outlaws, and sport."
Tags: The  National  Police  Gazette  magazine  Ursula  Andress 
Added: 30th September 2007
Views: 2048
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Posted By: Teresa
National Police Gazette The National Police Gazette, often simply referred to as the Police Gazette, was an American newspaper founded in 1845 by two journalists, Enoch E. Camp and George Wilkes. The editor and proprietor from 1877 until his death in 1922 was Richard Kyle Fox, an immigrant from Ireland, who turned the publication into something close to a national institution. With its focus on lurid crime, sleaze, vice, and bimbos, it was a periodical commonly found in the nation's pool rooms, barber shops, and taverns. Its sexy illustrations and advertisements sometimes challenged the obscenity laws of the day. What really made the Police Gazette popular was its coverage of sports. No other newspaper in the United States covered sports to its extent--especially prize fighting. Published on pink paper, its coverage of major boxing events was so beloved by the public that often 300,000 issues were printed to satisfy demand following an important bout. The usual run was about 150,000 copies--easily enough to make it a gold mine for Fox. Fox started the tradition of awarding championship belts to boxers. Fox died in 1922 and the Great Depression hurt circulation considerably the following decade. Neverthelees the Police Gazette survived as a periodical in various forms until 1977.
Tags: National  Police  Gazette 
Added: 30th January 2014
Views: 870
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Posted By: Lava1964
Clara Bow on the Beach Widely regarded as the most beautiful movie actress of the 1920s, Clara Bow poses on a beach in a swimsuit for a publicity photo. I'm big on nostalgia, but I think I prefer Kathy Ireland's 1989 SI cover photo to this. Call me fickle.
Tags: Clara  Bow  swimsuit 
Added: 19th February 2008
Views: 1998
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Posted By: Lava1964
1989 SI Swimsuit Cover Kathy Ireland I earlier posted the 1964 Sports Illustrated swimsuit cover. For purposes of comparison, check out my favorite SI cover girl, Kathy Ireland, from 1989. Doesn't she have beautiful eyes?
Tags: Kathy  Ireland  1989  SI  swimsuit 
Added: 18th February 2008
Views: 2887
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Posted By: Lava1964
Sinking of RMS Lusitania 1915 The RMS Lusitania was a British passenger liner that was torpedoed in the First World War by the German submarine U-20 off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. It sank in just 18 minutes. A total of 1,198 of 1,959 passengers perished, including 128 of the 197 Americans on board. Despite the large number of American casualties, U.S. president Woodrow Wilson only issued a formal complaint to the German government. He was heavily criticized in the British press for not declaring war. For years the British government insisted the Lusitania contained no war material, but a dive in 2006 found stores of ammunition. (Thus it was a legitimate war target for German submarines.) There is only one remaining Lusitania survivor, a 93-year-old Englishwoman, who was just three months old when the ship was sunk. The last American survivor died on April 12, 2008.
Tags: Lusitania  sinking 
Added: 28th April 2008
Views: 1300
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Posted By: Lava1964
Empress of Ireland Tragedy 1914 An almost forgotten maritime tragedy is the sinking of The Empress of Ireland, a trans-Atlantic ocean liner owned by the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company. At about 2 a.m. on May 29, 1914, during one of its regular voyages from Quebec City to Liverpool, it collided with the Norwegian ship Storstad in the cold waters of the St. Lawrence River. Out of the 1,477 passengers aboard, 1,012 perished. The high death toll was largely attributable to how quickly the ship sank (14 minutes) and that most of the passengers were in bed when the accident occurred. Among the dead were 167 Salvation Army musicians who were travelling to England to perform at a charity function. A Canadian inquiry into the disaster blamed the Storstad for the collision while a Norwegian inquiry blamed the Empress of Ireland. For years the Empress of Ireland was visited by scuba divers who plundered some of its valuables. However, it is now illegal to dive near the wreck as the Canadian government has declared it a maritime gravesite. (There are human remains inside the ship.) There are no living survivors from that awful night. The last one died in 1985.
Tags: Empress  of  Ireland  sinking 
Added: 29th April 2008
Views: 1721
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Posted By: Lava1964
My Three Sons - Original Cast My Three Sons premiered on ABC on September 29, 1960. Fred MacMurray (Steve Douglas) was with the series for the long haul as were second son Don Grady (Robbie)and third son Chip (Barry Livingtone). The episodes were black and white until 1965 when the show changed networks and aired on CBS. The original cast from the back-and-white years (shows that are generally not available in reruns) included Tim Considine as eldest son Mike and William Frawley as Bub O'Casey (the boys' maternal gradfather). The color era brought two cast changes: Mike was written out of the show (he had married and moved away) and replaced by a new, adopted son Ernie (Stanley Livingstone). By 1965 Frawley was in declining health, so Bub was also written out of the cast partway through the 1964-65 season (supposedly he was visiting Ireland) and replaced by his seafaring brother Uncle Charley (William Demarest).
Tags: My  Three  Sons  original  cast 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 4794
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Posted By: Lava1964
Our Gang - Jean Darling Jean Darling was one of the last Our Gang alumni to have any connection with the silent film era. Born Dorothy Jean LeVake in 1922, Darling got her big break at age four when she was accepted for a part in Hal Roach's Our Gang series. (By that time her name had been changed to Jean Darling.) Darling appeared in 35 Our Gang films. She essentially replaced Mary Kornman as the troupe's pretty blonde, a role she held through 1929. Darling's stint in the Our Gang cast ended at age seven, but she continued to appear in films, including an uncredited appearance in Laurel and Hardy's adaptation of Babes in Toyland (1934), and as the young Jane in Jane Eyre (1934). A round of stage and radio shows followed. Darling began to study singing. In 1940 she was given a scholarship by the New York Municipal Opera Association. She turned down an offer to play alongside Mickey Rooney in one of the MGM Andy Hardy movies. Instead, she went on Broadway, making her debut in the musical Count Me In in 1942. Darling's stage career hit its apex when she landed the role of Carrie Pipperidge in the original Broadway production of Carousel in 1945. She appeared in 850 consecutive performances of the play. Her role as Carrie helped her win parts for radio and TV in the 1950s. She hosted her own television show for NBC in New York City titled A Date with Jean Darling. Her daily TV show for women, The Singing Knit-Witch, aired on KHJ-TV in Hollywood. Later in life Darling began penning short mystery stories. She had more than 50 published. Darling resided in Ireland for many years, but died in Germany in 2015 at the age of 93.
Tags: Our  Gang  Jean  Darling 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 2113
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scrabble Cheating Scandal - 2012 It's not often that the U.S. National Scrabble Championship tournament prompts a discussion on an ESPN panel show, gets feature coverage on CNN, is reported in numerous overseas newspapers, and has an op-ed piece in the New York Times written about it, but it happened at the 2012 tourney in Orlando. Why? A youthful competitor was disqualified for cheating. It was the first time in the tournament's 35-year history that a player was booted out of the Nationals. The minor, whose identity is being protected by the North American Scrabble Players Association because of his age, was caught 'palming blanks' before his 24th-round match on Tuesday, August 14. At the previous year's tourney in Dallas, suspicions were raised about the same player because he only had six tournaments' worth of experience and did not possess especially strong word knowledge, yet he consistently scored exceptionally well. After the tournament, one suspicious opponent polled the boy's other opponents and discovered the youth had gotten about 90% of the important blank tiles over 31 games--which is statistically improbable. The legitimacy of the boy's 2011 performance was widely debated on Internet Scrabble forums, with the accusers often being denounced as jealous or sore losers. At the 2012 event, the boy's 'lucky tile drawing' again appeared. Before round 24 began, after all 100 tiles were supposed to have been put into the tile bag, the youth's opponent suspected that the boy had palmed the two valuable blank tiles instead of placing them into the bag. He summoned a tournament director (referee) to examine the bag to see if it contained 100 tiles or just 98. Just as the director was about to begin his count, an alert player at a nearby table shouted, 'He just threw two tiles onto the floor!' Sure enough, they were the two blank tiles. The youth was quickly disqualified--and the close-knit tournament Scrabble world knew about it almost immediately through Internet tournament coverage and social media. The I-told-you-so crowd had a field day. The news spread quickly beyond the Scrabble chatrooms. Within 40 minutes the story was on ABC News' website and on CNN's within an hour. Without much delay, the story spread to most of the English-speaking world, garnering print media coverage in Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand, among other far-flung places. The British enjoy a good scandal, so it was not too surprising that UK newspapers were escpecially interested in the youth's disqualification. A picture of the youth, cleverly Photo-Shopped to show him playing Scrabble behind prison bars with the vertical caption 'BUSTED' (written in Scrabble tiles, of course), circulated in cyberspace. John D. Williams of the National Scrabble Association joked, "We're one step away from drug testing." Nigel Richards, a brilliant New Zealander who lives in Malaysia, won the the tournament and the $10,000 first prize for the third time in four years in a spectacular manner--but Richards' feat was almost completely overshadowed by the juicy cheating scandal.
Tags: Scrabble  scandal  cheating 
Added: 5th September 2012
Views: 1236
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Posted By: Lava1964

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