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COMMIES FROM MARS The RED Planet The tentacles of COMMUNISM reach far and wide! Someone must have downloaded MP3's! And here they come! Ok, no more individually wrapped cheese slices for you Marie! Wow, comics sure have changed! I had to edit the pic for obvious reasons.
Tags: Commies  Invasion  Space  Comics 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 1928
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Sir Douglas Quintet   Shes About a Mover 1965 In 1965, the Sir Douglas Quintet was formed and the group's name was chosen in an effort to make the band seem British to benefit from the British invasion. This image had its problems, particularly Doug Sahm's Texas accent and that two fifths of the band were of Mexican origin. The band had a top 20 US hit with the song "She's About a Mover" and a number of lesser hit over the years. The SDQ broke up after a bust for marijuana possession in Corpus Christi, TX, and Doug moved to San Francisco, forming the Honkey Blues Band before reforming the new SDQ with a new lineup was resigned and they released the successful single and album "Mendocino". The record contained the song "At the Crossroad" with the legendary Doug Sahm line "You just can't live in Texas if you don't have a lot of soul".
Tags: sir  douglas  quintet  shes  about  a  mover  60s  music 
Added: 5th October 2007
Views: 2485
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Posted By: Naomi
 Ferry Cross the Mersey Gerry and The Pacemakers were one of the few groups in the 60's to initially challenge The Beatles in popularity. Like The Beatles, they came from Liverpool and were also managed by Brian Epstein. Despite their early success, the group never had another number one single in the UK. Gerry Marsden began writing most of their own songs, including "It's Gonna Be All Right", "I'm the One", and "Ferry Cross the Mersey", as well as their first and biggest U.S. hit, "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying". All of these represented the band's light, poppy, enjoyable sound. By late 1965, their popularity was rapidly declining on both sides of the Atlantic. They lacked both the innovations of the Beatles and the rawer musical and visual edge of some of the other British Invasion groups, and they soon seemed un-hip. They disbanded in October 1966, with much of their latter recorded material never released in the UK. Drummer Freddie Marsden died on December 9, 2006, at age 66.
Tags: gerry  and  the  pacemakers  ferry  cross  the  mersey  60 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 2318
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Posted By: Naomi
Future Pizza Delivery Big brother won't be our government, it will be US. Every time you use your pharmacy or grocery card for the "discount" you aren't getting a discount- you are selling your buying habits.
Tags: Future  Pizza  Delivery  Invasion  of  Privacy   
Added: 31st January 2009
Views: 1287
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Posted By: pfc
The Invaders This show aired from 67-68 and was cancelled after one and a half seasons. A pre-Internet urban legend (of the missing show kind) has circulated about a hypothetical final episode of the original series. According to that, David Vincent finally manages to convince the authorities and the mainstream of the Invaders' plans, and a massive invasion attempt is successfully thwarted. However, the final scene shows Vincent speaking through a transmitter to a different species of space invaders, to tell them that the coast was now clear. I like this idea of Vincent's fight having taken place in his position as a mercenary of the second alien race. Sounds like an idea Rod Serling would have come up with!
Tags: the  invaders  roy  thinnes  david  vincent  sci-fi  abc  television  series 
Added: 29th July 2008
Views: 1316
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Posted By: Naomi
Jan and Dean  Baby Talk Jan Berry and Dean Torrence first became friends on the football team at L.A.'s University High, but Dean's first success came with Arnie Ginsburg (not the Boston DJ the duo scored a big doo-wop hit as Jan and Arnie with 1958's "Jennie Lee." That song, actually written about a stripper, gained Berry some friends in the business, including Herb Alpert and producer Lou Adler. Together with friend Torrence, who'd just returned from an Army stint, they developed a song called "Baby Talk." It was a smash, but it wasn't until 1963, with the release of the Four Seasons' inspired "Linda," that the Jan and Dean sound began to take shape. After meeting the Beach Boys on the L.A. scene, Jan befriended leader Brian Wilson, and thw two began work on what would become "Surf City." Inspired by the local scene and Wilson's very recent hits, "Surfin'" and "Surfin' Safari" -- and benefiting from Berry's amazing self-taught production skills, it went straight to Number One. The duo of Jan and Dean flourished well into the mid-sixties, weathering even the British Invasion. But on April 12, 1966, Berry's Stingray slammed into a parked gardener's truck (not at the site mentioned in "Dead Man's Curve," despite legend), and Jan entered a decade-long nightmare of physical recovery, drug abuse, and depression. By the mid-Seventies, amazingly, Berry could perform almost at normal, and the duo began an amazing comeback that lasted well into the mid-Eighties. Berry passed away in 2004.
Tags: jan  and  dean  baby  talk  60s  rock  and  roll 
Added: 15th August 2008
Views: 1392
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Posted By: Naomi
Invasion Of The Body Snatchers I bet this one had you looking around you to see if anyone had changed? Sci-Fi took a turn in the 50's and had the box office registrars ringing.
Tags: Kevin  McCarthy  Dana  Wynter  Invasion  Of  The  Body  Snatchers 
Added: 31st August 2008
Views: 1040
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Posted By: donmac101
America Comes of Age The Korean War America Comes of Age - The Korean War Like Lambs to the Slaughter US defense spending had reached a modern day low. The military was ill-prepared and ill-equipped, those in authority embraced questionable doctrines. From a post World War II soft life in Japan, with servants to wash their clothes and shine their boots, these American youth were suddenly uprooted and flung into harm's way. There was no "Remember Pearl Harbor." The North Korean People's Army was on a roll. The North Korean People's Army had invaded the Republic of Korea in South Korea only 11 days earlier and overwhelmed the ill-equipped Republic of Korea armed forces. The North Korean People's Army steamrolled into Seoul, driving refugees and regrouping Republic of Korea Army units before it, clogging roads and throwing the countryside into a panic. The invasion caught General Douglas MacArthur and his Far East Command and Eighth Army by surprise, despite recent intelligence reports that North Korea was planning for an attack on the Republic of Korea. General MacArthur had disregarded the reports, saying he did not believe war with North Korea was imminent. The events that unfolded on the Korean peninsula some 45 years ago offer a telling reminder of what happens when a force goes to war unprepared. Disaster lurks around every bend. Facing a force of 130,000 NKP soldiers, 3,000 Soviet advisors, a full array of heavy weapons, aircraft and the formidable T-34/85, arguably the best tank to come out of World War II. American GIs fought bravely at times. At other times when confronted with overwhelming, numerically superior forces, they "bugged-out" to the rear, cursing their government for sending them to this stinking, God-forsaken place where human feces were used to fertilize the land. Photos The Library of Congress The Korean War National Museum U.S. Army Center of Military History Democratic People's Republic of Korea Audio Clips The Library of Congress - Veterans History Project Wessel's Living History Farm Music Perry Como Far Away Places Aaron Copeland Fanfare for the Common Man John Williams Saving Private Ryan Omaha beach Hymn to the Fallen conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso For more information about the Korean War http://www.army.mil/cmh/ http://www.korea50.mil/ http://americanradioworks.publicradio... http://www.paulnoll.com/Korea/index.html http://www.loc.gov/vets/ http://www.koreanwar.org/html/units/2...
Tags: Korean    War    1950 
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1184
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1514
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Posted By: Lava1964
Martian Invasion Panic - 1938 On Sunday, October 30, 1938, a young Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre On The Air presented their version of H.G. Wells' 1895 science fiction novel 'War of the Worlds' as a radio drama on CBS. About two-thirds of the 55-minute broadcast comprised of faux news bulletins. They began with accounts of a supposed meteorite landing in a New Jersey township which turned out to be a Martian spacecraft. The aliens then began a reign of terror across New Jersey and into New York City, killing everyone with heat rays and poison gas. The show was given an air of authenticity by using interviews with various fictitious officials and a bogus Princeton astronomy professor who speculated on the Martians' strength and motives for invasion. Although the broadcast featured no fewer than four instances when it was declared to be a radio drama, many people did not hear these disclaimers. Civil authorities were inundated by telephone calls. Panic was especially high in some parts of Washington state where a power outage coincidentally occurred just after the part of the broadcast where the Martians began their destructive rampage. It is estimated that six million Americans heard at least a portion of the broadcast, and about 1.7 million of them thought it was real. Still, most radio listeners that night were oblivious to the so-called 'panic.' Welles' broadcast ran opposite the hugely popular Edgar Bergen program on NBC.
Tags: Martians  radio  Orson  Welles 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 1552
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Posted By: Lava1964

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