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Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1574
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Posted By: Lava1964
James Gammon Passes today at the age of 70 James Gammon, the gravel-voiced actor who played the manager of the Cleveland Indians in the 1980s comedy "Major League", Nash Bridge's Dad and had a host of other movie and TV roles, has died. He was 70.
Tags: James  Gammon  Passes  today  at  the  age  of  70  Major  League",  Nash  Bridge's  Dad 
Added: 19th July 2010
Views: 900
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Posted By: Old Fart
Oorang Indians The Oorang Indians were a travelling team in the National Football League from LaRue, Ohio (near Marion). The team was named after the Oorang dog kennels. It was basically a novelty team put together by the kennels' owner, Walter Lingo, for marketing purposes. All the players were Native Americans, with Jim Thorpe as its star. The Indians played the 1922 and 1923 NFL seasons. Of the 20 games they played over those two seasons, only one was played at 'home' in nearby Marion, OH. Only four games were won by the team. With a population well under 1,000 people, LaRue is easily the smallest town ever to have been the home of an NFL franchise. The Indians were the first NFL team to have a halftime show. (It featured the kennels' dogs.) The team's owner was not too concerned about fielding a competitive squad--and it showed. Discipline was lax on road trips and the players routinely engaged in heavy drinking binges at speakeasies. In one famous incident in St. Louis, the Indians commandeered a trolley car to get them back to their hotel. Since the trolley was headed in the wrong direction, the players simply lifted it, and turned it around on the tracks.
Tags: football  Oorang  Indians  NFL 
Added: 22nd January 2011
Views: 939
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Posted By: Lava1964
Addie Joss Benefit Game 1911 On July 24, 1911 the first 'all-star game' in MLB history took place at League Park in Cleveland. It predated the first official ASG by 22 years. The contest was a benefit game to raise money for the widow and two children of Cleveland pitcher Addie Joss, who had died of meningitis at age 31 three months earlier. Joss was a hugely popular and dominant pitcher whose death stunned the baseball world. The plan was to have a team of American League All-Stars face Joss' Indians. The idea was popular with the players but not so with AL president Ban Johnson who was worried about the disruption of the AL schedule. He threatened to fine any players who left their clubs to participate in the benefit game. In the end public pressure persuaded Johnson to withdraw his objection. The All-Stars, led by Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, and several other future Hall-of-Famers, won the game 5-3. More than $11,000 was raised for the Joss family. Box seats that normally cost $1 were sold by special subscription for $100 apiece.
Tags: baseball  Addie  Joss  All-star  game  Cleveland 
Added: 12th July 2011
Views: 1151
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jim Joyce Blown Call Incident It was one of the strangest feel-good stories in sports history: On Wednesday, June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga was one out from pitching a rare perfect game. Cleveland Indians' batter Jason Donald hit a ground ball to the right side of the infield. First baseman Miguel Cabrera moved toward second base to field the ball. Galarraga ran from the pitcher's mound to cover first base. Cabrera's throw to Galarraga beat Donald to the bag by about three-quarters of a step--but Jim Joyce, a highly regarded 22-year MLB veteran umpire, incorrectly ruled Donald safe. Galarraga retired the next Indians' hitter for a 3-0 shutout win, but Joyce came under immediate fire for missing the call that cost Galarraga a perfect game. Death threats were sent to his family members in Oregon. MLB Security provided extra protection to Joyce and his umpiring crew. However, Joyce did a remarkable thing: he publicly and candidly acknowledged his error and tearfully apologized to Galarraga in the umpires' room. Galarraga handled the situation incredibly well, telling Joyce that "we're all human." The next afternoon, Joyce was working home plate. Tigers' manager Jim Leyland sent Galarraga to the plate to present the lineup card to a teary-eyed Joyce (see photo). The crowd loudly cheered both Joyce and Galarraga. The dynamics of the situation completely changed: Joyce was then widely hailed as a hero for owning up to his mistake. He received hundreds of letters and emails of support from people from all walks of life. When Joyce's umpiring crew arrived in Philadelphia for their next series, they were applauded at the airport.
Tags: umpire  baseball  Jim  Joyce  mistake 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 897
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Posted By: Lava1964
David Clyde - Pitching Bust David Clyde was perhaps the biggest disappointment in baseball history--which is saying quite a bit! The left-handed pitcher played five MLB seasons with the Texas Rangers (19731975) and Cleveland Indians (19781979). He is noted for his once promising baseball career which ended at age 26 because of arm and shoulder injuries. Hyped as the next Sandy Koufax, Clyde had a stellar amateur career at Westchester High School in Houston, TX where he compiled a minuscule 0.18 ERA in 148 innings. He was drafted by the Texas Rangers with the first overall pick in the 1973 MLB draft. As a way to boost poor attendance in Texas, Clyde was to pitch his first two professional games with the Rangers before moving down to the minor leagues for experience. He made his major league debut at age 18 on June 27, 1973 versus the Minnesota Twins--just 20 days after pitching his last high school game. Before a sellout crowd, Clyde walked the first two Twins he faced and then struck out the next three. He pitched five innings, allowed one hit, and got credit for the Rangers' 4-3 win. The strong attendance caused Rangers' owner Bob Short to reconsider his plans for Clyde. He decided to keep Clyde on the Rangers' roster as a much-needed gate attraction. In 1973 Clyde compiled a poor 5.01 earned run average in 18 starts. Worse, Clyde received very little mentorship. He fell into a clique of Ranger players who were known for their undisciplined behavior away from the diamond. Journalists rightly criticized the Rangers for promoting Clyde too soon. After an uneventful 1974 campaign, he developed shoulder trouble and was sent down to the minor leagues in 1975, where Clyde pitched three seasons. He was traded to the Cleveland Indians in 1978, and played two seasons before being demoted. Clyde attempted to make a comeback with the Houston Astros in 1981 but was unsuccessful. He fell a few innings short of qualifying for a MLB pension.
Tags: David  Clyde  MLB  pitcher 
Added: 16th September 2013
Views: 760
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lays Potato Chips Columbus and the Indians Tags: Lays  Potato  Chips  Columbus  and  the  Indians  discover  America  racist  Indian  Giver  pale  face  bet  you  can't  eat  just  one  so  light  so  crisp  Frito  Lay    Bret  Lahr  Cowardly  Lion  Wizard  of  Oz 
Added: 5th February 2016
Views: 895
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Posted By: Cliffy
Stanford Indians From 1930 to 1972 Stanford University's varsity sports teams were known as the Indians. (At the 1971 Rose Bowl game, the cheerleaders were dressed in native costumes for the band's halftime show.) However, pressure by native American groups, who claimed the nickname was demeaning and insensitive to their heritage, caused the University to change it to Cardinals in 1975. (The new name had nothing to do with the bird, but rather the cardinal red color of the uniforms.) The move was quite controversial. For the first few years there was annual pressure to reinstate the Indians name and logo. However, in 1975 Stanford's board of governors declared the disavowal of the Indians nickname to be irrevocable. The singular Cardinal nickname was officially adopted in 1990. Still there are some old fans and alumni who pine for the return of the Indian logo and name.
Tags: Stanford  Indians  nickname 
Added: 2nd December 2017
Views: 36
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Posted By: Lava1964

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