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Queen of Mean Convicted, 1992 Leona Helmsley, nicknamed the "Queen of Mean" by the press, receives a four-year prison sentence, 750 hours of community service, and a $7.1 million tax fraud fine in New York. For many, Helmsley became the object of loathing and disgust when she quipped that "only the little people pay taxes." Leona's husband, Harry, was one of the world's wealthiest real estate moguls, with an estimated $5 billion to $10 billion in property holdings. The couple lived in a dazzling penthouse overlooking Central Park and also maintained an impressive mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Leona, who operated the Helmsley Palace on Madison Avenue, was severely disliked by her employees. Though they lavishly furnished their homes and hotel, the Helmsleys were curiously diligent about evading the required payments and taxes for their purchases. Much of their personal furniture was written off as a business expense, and there were claims that the Helmsleys extorted free furnishings from their suppliers. Contractors were hardly ever paid on time-if at all-and many filed lawsuits to recover even just a portion of what they were owed. Leona reportedly also purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars of jewelry in New York City but insisted that empty boxes be sent to Connecticut so that she could avoid the sales tax. Given her offensive personality, many were quite pleased by Leona's legal troubles. Even celebrity lawyer Alan Dershowitz could not win her immunity from the law. Following her conviction, Federal Judge John Walker publicly reprimanded her, saying, "Your conduct was the product of naked greed [and] the arrogant belief that you were above the law." Leona Helmsley was sent to jail in 1992 and was released in 1994. In 2002, Helmsley, whose husband Harry died in 1997, again found herself in court after being sued by Charles Bell, a former employee who accused Leona of firing him soley because he was homosexual. A jury ordered Helmsley to pay him more than $11 million in damages. Helmsley died in August 2007 at age 87. She famously left $12 million to her dog, Trouble.
Tags: News 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 857
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Jacqueline Gareau Victory Ceremony On Arpil 21, 1980, Jacqueline Gareau, 27, of Montreal competed in the prestgious Boston Marathon. Gareau took the lead amongst the female runners after seven miles. Accordingly, the television coverage focused on her until the controversial finish. Gareau was shocked to find another runner, Rosie Ruiz, had broken the tape ahead of her. Ruiz was disqualified after an investigation proved that she had started the race, vanished, and then re-entered the marathon course a few hundred meters from the finish line. Despite overwhelming evidence that she had cheated, Ruiz remained utterly defiant--to the point of refusing to return her medal. Gareau was awarded a medal a few days after the fact in a subdued ceremony. Twenty-five years later, at the 2005 Boston Marathon, the 52-year-old Gareau rightfully got her "moment of victory" denied to her in 1980 by Ruiz's cheating. Gareau was allowed to ceremonially break the tape, and was given a bigger medal than Ruiz had gotten in 1980.
Tags: Jacqueline  Gareau  marathon  winner  ceremony 
Added: 17th September 2012
Views: 3414
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jim Joyce Blown Call Incident It was one of the strangest feel-good stories in sports history: On Wednesday, June 2, 2010, Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga was one out from pitching a rare perfect game. Cleveland Indians' batter Jason Donald hit a ground ball to the right side of the infield. First baseman Miguel Cabrera moved toward second base to field the ball. Galarraga ran from the pitcher's mound to cover first base. Cabrera's throw to Galarraga beat Donald to the bag by about three-quarters of a step--but Jim Joyce, a highly regarded 22-year MLB veteran umpire, incorrectly ruled Donald safe. Galarraga retired the next Indians' hitter for a 3-0 shutout win, but Joyce came under immediate fire for missing the call that cost Galarraga a perfect game. Death threats were sent to his family members in Oregon. MLB Security provided extra protection to Joyce and his umpiring crew. However, Joyce did a remarkable thing: he publicly and candidly acknowledged his error and tearfully apologized to Galarraga in the umpires' room. Galarraga handled the situation incredibly well, telling Joyce that "we're all human." The next afternoon, Joyce was working home plate. Tigers' manager Jim Leyland sent Galarraga to the plate to present the lineup card to a teary-eyed Joyce (see photo). The crowd loudly cheered both Joyce and Galarraga. The dynamics of the situation completely changed: Joyce was then widely hailed as a hero for owning up to his mistake. He received hundreds of letters and emails of support from people from all walks of life. When Joyce's umpiring crew arrived in Philadelphia for their next series, they were applauded at the airport.
Tags: umpire  baseball  Jim  Joyce  mistake 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 1183
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Cowsills The Rain The Park And Other Things This song encapsulates for me the whole flower power movement. It's just so sixties, beautiful, slightly trippy and just a joy to hear even though I've heard it hundreds of times. Fabulous harmonies. This song takes me back, probably to a time that never was and a place that never existed.
Tags: Cowsills  Rain  Park  Other  Things 
Added: 19th February 2013
Views: 1875
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Posted By: kinkman
The Rutles Piggy In The Middle Many considered the Rutles' Tragical History Tour more tragic than historical. When it was broadcast on the CBC on April 1st, 1968, it was even shown upside-down. People didn't know what to make of it. I realize now that what the Rutles were saying is that we ourselves should be upside-down when we were watching it. Then it would all make sense. Hundreds of young people all over the world joined me in doing just that. We were all part of something special. In retrospect I think it was all about the peace movement. It's hard to fight when you're upside-down. Mind you, the movie still didn't make sense, but the music was amazing.
Tags: rutles  piggy  april  fools 
Added: 1st April 2013
Views: 1285
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Posted By: kinkman
 Saddam Hussein Received Key To Detroit Saddam Hussein directed hundreds of thousands of dollars to a church in Detroit and ended up receiving a key to the city for more than two decades. This is after he became the president of Iraq. Saddam’s bond with Detroit started in 1979 with Reverend Yasso congratulating him on his presidency. The church received a sum of $250,000. Post this donation, Yasso referred to Saddam as a kind, generous and cooperative person. He later on reported that money and power changed the person.
Tags:   Saddam  Hussein  Received  Key  To  Detroit  key  to  the  city       
Added: 26th April 2013
Views: 1948
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Posted By: Cliffy
Deanna Durbin 1921-2013 It has been reported that Deanna Durbin, who first attained Hollywood stardom as a teen star in the 1930s, has died at age 91. Durbin had been pretty much a recluse since retiring from films at age 29. In 1939, Durbin and fellow teen star Mickey Rooney were presented special Academy Awards for their “significant contribution in bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth …” At the time of her presentation, Durbin had appeared in only four films, such was her star power. By the end of the 1930, the Winnipeg-born Durbin had become one of the biggest box-office stars of the period. Accounts circulated that she saved Universal from bankruptcy, although that was not wholly accurate; however, it was estimated that her films' earnings accounted for 17 percent of the studio's revenue during a period late in the decade. During World War II, Durbin was named the favorite of more than 300 different groups of servicemen. Reportedly, she was Winston Churchill's favorite movie star, and the British Prime Minister was allowed to see her films before they were released to the general public in Great Britain. Following crucial British victories, Churchill would celebrate by re-screening her 1937 film One Hundred Men and a Girl, accompanied by brandy and a cigar. Durbin assessed her popularity, especially among older men, in matter-of-fact terms: “I represented the ideal daughter millions of fathers and mothers wished they had.” In 1949, at the height of her worldwide fame, Durbin quit the movie business. The following year, she moved to France and left the public eye. She lived outside of Paris with her third husband, French director/film executive Charles David, who had directed her in Lady on a Train (1945). At the time of her retirement at age 29, Durbin was the highest-paid female screen star in Hollywood and, accordingly, the highest-paid woman in the world.
Tags: Hollywood  Deanna  Durbin  obit 
Added: 1st May 2013
Views: 945
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chile vs Nobody - 1974 WC Qualifier In one of the strangest sporting scenes ever, on November 21, 1973 the Chilean soccer team took to the field at the National Stadium in Santiago in a crucial qualifying match for the 1974 World Cup tournament against no opposition! Their opponents were supposed to be the Soviet Union. Chile and the USSR were vying for the final berth for the 1974 World Cup tournament in West Germany. In the first game of a two-game playoff, the teams had played to a hard-fought 0-0 draw two months earlier in Moscow. However, a right-wing revolution toppled the elected Chilean government shortly thereafter. Hundreds of undesirable political leftists were executed at Santiago's National Stadium just two weeks before the scheduled return match. The horrified Soviets wanted the match to be played at a neutral site--or at the very least switched to a different venue within Chile. FIFA refused to move the game to another stadium, so the Soviets refused to play. At the appointed time, as this clip shows, the Chileans kicked off, made a few passes, and scored a goal into an unguarded net. Since there was no opposing team to take the subsequent kickoff, the referee forfeited the game to the Chileans. Chile was eliminated in the group stage of the 1974 World Cup.
Tags: soccer  World  Cup  Chile  USSR  qualifier 
Added: 16th October 2013
Views: 1044
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1970
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theodore Roosevelt - Near Fatal Carriage Accident On September 3, 1902, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and several other prominent politicians came within inches of being killed by a speeding trolley car in Pittsfield, MA. The president, riding in a horse-drawn carriage, was on his way to deliver a speech when the accident occurred. The carriage was knocked about 40 feet upon impact. Secret Service agent William Craig was fatally injured, becoming the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. Roosevelt was knocked from the carriage and landed face first upon the street. He suffered superficial wounds to his face and leg. (The seriousness of Roosevelt's injuries was probably understated. Roosevelt's leg wound became infected and abscessed. He required surgery and was confined to a wheelchair for a short time. Although the leg wound healed completely, Roosevelt was bothered by the aftereffects of his injury for the rest of his life.) David J. Pratt, the driver of the carriage containing the president, was severely injured. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary to the President, was severely bruised. Winthrop Murray Crane, Governor of Massachusetts, and George P. Lawrence, Representative in Congress from the First Massachusetts district, escaped with only a few bruises. All were in the carriage with Mr. Roosevelt. A newspaper account said, "Under the sunniest of September skies the distinguished party was driving through the Berkshire Hills in a landau drawn by four white horses, the reins handled by Pratt, the President and his companions going from Dalton to Lenox. The carriage was struck squarely just behind the box on which Pratt and Craig were sitting. The vehicle was hurled 40 feet across the road. Craig was instantly killed and ground under the heavy machinery of the car into an unrecognizable mass. The President was thrown into the air and landed on the right side of his face in the roadway. Mr. Cortelyou was thrown out and almost rendered unconscious. Gov. Crane, who, next to Craig, was the nearest to the immediate danger line, was thrown out, but...escaped with only slight bruises." No one on the trolley was injured. According to reports, the trolley was speeding in an attempt to get to its destination ahead of Roosevelt's carriage. Euclid Madden was the trolley car's motorman. He received a six-month prison term for his role in the accident. James Kelley was the trolley car's conductor. In 2002, on the hundredth anniversary of the accident, the Secret Service held a special ceremony at agent Craig's grave where a marker was placed.
Tags: Theodore  Roosevelt  1902  accident  carriage  trolley 
Added: 16th September 2014
Views: 4451
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Posted By: Lava1964

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