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Simpson Mastercard Commercial Tags: Homer  Simpson  Mastercard  TV  Commercial 
Added: 5th July 2007
Views: 2362
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
Jimmy Finlayson Fans of Laurel and Hardy's films will recognize this face: It is James (Jimmy) Finlayson, a Scottish-born actor best known today for being the foil in several L&H films. He often expressed his exasperation at the twosome's antics by saying D'oh! Long after Finlayson died in 1948, his D'oh was resurrected by Dan Castellaneta who voices cartoon icon Homer Simpson.
Tags: James  Jimmy  Finlayson 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2014
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Posted By: Lava1964
1952 World Series Game 7 Vintage TV coverage of the seventh game of the 1952 World Series between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees. Watch Mickey Mantle belt a homer over Ebbets Field's right field wall!
Tags: World  Series  baseball 
Added: 6th March 2008
Views: 3910
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Posted By: Lava1964
Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig The scariest sight ever to face a big league pitcher: Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, pictured here in a photo I'd date around 1931. In 1927 Babe Ruth hit a record 60 homers to lead the American League. Gehrig was second with 47. In third place was another Yankee, Tony Lazzeri, with a mere 18.
Tags: Babe  Ruth  Lou  Gehrig 
Added: 5th August 2008
Views: 1093
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hank Aaron 1974 SI Cover The succinct caption says it all. This 1974 issue of Sports Illustrated chronicled Hank Aaron's record breaking 715th career homer. Aaron is still the all-time home run champ in my books.
Tags: SI  cover  Hank  Aaron 
Added: 19th January 2009
Views: 1008
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jackie Robinson - First Home Run Here's a bit of baseball history: This news photo captures Jackie Robinson touching home plate after hitting his first major league home run. The date was April 18, 1947. The site was the Polo Grounds; it was the New York Giants' 1947 home opener. Robinson's homer came in the top of the third inning off Giants' pitcher Dave Koslo. The blow gave the visiting Brooklyn Dodgers a short-lived 2-1 lead. The Giants went on to win the game 10-4. Shaking Robinson's hand is #17 Tommy Tatum (who played only four games for Brooklyn in 1947). The Giants' catcher is #5 Walker Cooper.
Tags: Jackie  Robinson  home  run  baseball 
Added: 30th January 2010
Views: 13485
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Posted By: Lava1964
First MLB All-Star Game 1933 The first MLB All-Star Game was played n 1933. Arch Ward, the Chicago Tribune's sports editor, came up with the idea for the game. It was to coincide with the celebration of the cityís 'Century of Progress' Exposition. By the 1930s, baseball had already established itself as Americaís favorite pastime and the national exposition provided the perfect stage to introduce baseballís best to the rest of the country. The game was originally conceived as a single, one-time event to help lift the spirits of the country during the Great Depression. However, its enormous popularity made the All-Star Game an annual event. That first All-Star Game was played on July 6, 1933 at Comiskey Park in Chicago on a day when both leagues had no games scheduled. Retired Giants' manager John McGraw was chosen to manage the National League team, while Philadelphia Athletics' manager Connie Mack led the American League team. More than 47,000 fans attended. There was one player in particular who excited fans and players alike. 'We wanted to see the Babe,' said NL starting pitcher Bill Hallahan. 'Sure, he was old and had a big waistline, but that didnít make any difference. We were on the same field as Babe Ruth.' (The National League team is shown in the photo below.) The first run was scored in the second inning, when AL starting pitcher Lefty Gomez drove in Jimmie Dykes with a single. In the next inning, Ruth gave the fans what they came to see--a two-run homer into the right-field stands. The crowd 'roared in acclamation' for the homer, according to Baseball Almanac. The AL went on the win the game 4-2, bolstered by Ruthís home run, Jimmy Dykes' two hits, and seven innings of two-run pitching by Lefty Gomez, who got credit for the win. The National League was led by the 'Fordham Flash,' Frankie Frisch of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had two hits (including a home run) and two hits by Bill Terry, the first baseman of the New York Giants.
Tags: baseball  all-star  game 
Added: 11th July 2010
Views: 1447
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Posted By: Lava1964
Home Run Baker John Franklin Baker was the Philadelphia Athletics' third baseman during their glory years of the early 1910s. Baker first led the American League in home runs in 1911 and earned the nickname 'Home Run' during the 1911 World Series versus the New York Giants. In that series he hit a go-ahead homer off Rube Marquard in game two, and a ninth-inning game-tying homer off Christy Mathewson in game three. His 1911 home run crown would be the first of four consecutive seasons leading the American League. His home run totals during the dead-ball era were modest: He hit 11 in 1911, 10 in 1912, 12 in 1913, and nine home runs in 1914. His career home run total is just 48--a clear indication that home runs were a rarity in the 'dead ball era.'
Tags: baseball  Home  Run  Baker 
Added: 19th July 2010
Views: 1270
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 1828
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harmon Killebrew passes at age 74 Harmon Killebrew, the big-swinging Hall of Famer whose tape-measure home runs made him the cornerstone of the Minnesota Twins, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., after battling esophageal cancer. He was 74. The Twins said Killebrew passed away peacefully with his wife, Nita, and their family at his side. He announced his diagnosis just six months ago and last week Killebrew said doctors had deemed the "awful disease" incurable. Killebrew is 11th on baseball's all-time home run list after a 22-year career. His eight seasons with 40 or more homers still is tied for second in league history to Babe Ruth, and his upper-cut swing formed the silhouette that inspired Major League Baseball's official logo.
Tags: Harmon  Killebrew,  Hall  of  Fame,  Minnesota  Twins,  esophageal  cancer,       
Added: 17th May 2011
Views: 1162
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Posted By: pfc

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