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Sun Herald Ouch funny, very very funny!
Tags: australia      commercial      sun  herald  ouch 
Added: 28th December 2008
Views: 1202
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
First Issue Beauty Parade Beauty Parade was the first of Robert Harrison's series of girlie magazines, published in October 1941. At the time Harrison was working for Martin Quigley, the publisher of "Motion Picture Daily" and "Motion Picture Herald", the story goes that Harrison used to paste together Beauty Parade single handedly in the office after the rest of the staff had gone home. Compared to his later titles, Beauty Parade was alot tamer, although it still featured one of main characteristics of all his magazines, the photostory.
Tags: beauty  parade  magazine 
Added: 27th August 2007
Views: 2102
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Posted By: sneakysnake
Rosie the Riveter Here are some great photos from the Library of Congress. I first heard about this when I was a kid, from my mom, who worked as a riveter for an aircraft plant during WWII. Rosie was an actual person, a riveter from Kentucky who represented the six million women who worked in the manufacturing plants that produced munitions and material during World War II. These women took the places of the male workers who were absent fighting in the Pacific and European theaters. The character is now considered a feminist icon in the US, and a herald of women's economic power to come. Rosie and her slogan were featured on posters, magazines, and more. These hard working women were paid a whopping $31.21 a week compared to men who brought home $54.65. Now....over 60 years later we're still fighting for equal pay!
Tags: rosie  the  riveter 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 2301
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Posted By: Naomi
Boston Marathon Cheater Rosie Ruiz On April 21, 1980 unheralded Rosie Ruiz was the first woman to cross the finish line in the prestigious Boston Marathon. Her apparent victory in record time was immediately suspicious. First, everyone assumed Jacqueline Gareau was the leading female. Nobody saw Gareau lose the lead in the race at anytime after the eighth mile. Furthermore, Ruiz's running shoes were barely scuffed and she was hardly perspiring in the unseasonably warm weather. Two Harvard University students signed affidavits stating they saw Ruiz illegally enter the course just a few hundred yards from the finish line. Ruiz denied the accusations and maintained she had run unnoticed among a pack of male runners. Few people believed her story and she was subsequently disqualified after an investigation. To this day Ruiz has stubbornly refused to return her winner's medal, so Gareau was given a larger medal. Twenty five years later Gareau was ceremoniously allowed to break the tape--a thrill that Ruiz deprived her from experiencing in 1980. Ruiz had qualified to run in Boston by finishing the 1979 New York City Marathon with a decent time, but investigators discovered she had cheated there too. (She left the course after a few hundred yards, took a subway train to an area near the finish line, illegally re-entered the race and finished 26th.) Ruiz promised to prove her innocence by winning the 1980 New York City Marathon. She never showed up.
Tags: Rosie  Ruiz  cheater  Boston  Marathon 
Added: 30th November 2007
Views: 4402
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olivia Newton John   Hark The Herald Angels Sing Tags: Olivia  Newton  John      Hark  The  Herald  Angels  Sing 
Added: 25th December 2007
Views: 1279
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Posted By: Old Fart
William F  Buckley Jr Dies at 82 William F. Buckley Jr., the erudite Ivy Leaguer and conservative herald who showered huge and scornful words on liberalism as he observed, abetted and cheered on the right's post-World War II rise from the fringes to the White House, died Wednesday. He was 82. Editor, columnist, novelist, debater, TV talk show star of "Firing Line," harpsichordist, trans-oceanic sailor and even a good-natured loser in a New York mayor's race, Buckley worked at a daunting pace, taking as little as 20 minutes to write a column for his magazine, the National Review.
Tags: Ronald      Reagan      William      Buckley    Dies  at  82    Jr      Panama     
Added: 27th February 2008
Views: 1208
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Posted By: Cliffy
1984 Canon Typewriter Commercial This is a fascinating 1984 commercial for Canon typewriters. This one has computer-like features to automatically line up decimals and make changes. In other words, it's heralding the very technology that will soon render it obsolete!
Tags: Canon  typewriter  commercial 
Added: 8th May 2008
Views: 1384
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Posted By: Lava1964
Notre Dame Four Horsemen 1924 Notre Dame defeated Army 13-7 in a college football game on October 18, 1924. Grantland Rice of the New York Herald-Tribune began his eloquent report this way: 'Outlined against a blue-grey October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.' Rice's article was terrific, but what really made Notre Dame's Four Horsemen famous was this photograph. Once the victorious Irish arrived back on campus, team publicity man George Strickler posed Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden atop horses borrowed from a local livery stable. The photograph was widely circulated and Notre Dame's 1924 backfield became legendary.
Tags: Notre  Dame  Four  Horsemen 
Added: 16th June 2008
Views: 2106
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Posted By: Lava1964
Salvador Sanchez Had Mexico's Salvador Sanchez lived longer, he may have gone down as the greatest featherweight champion in boxing history. As an unheralded 21-year-old, Sanchez upset popular Danny Lopez to win the WBC version of the featherweight title on February 2, 1980. Combining punching power and boxing skill, Sanchez defeated all comers and became a fixture on network TV--a rarity for a Mexican fighter. He defeated Lopez in a rematch and a young Azumah Nelson, who would become a great champion himself. On July 21, 1982, Sanchez was killed in a single-vehicle automobile crash in Mexico. He was 23 years old. His pro record was 44-1-1.
Tags: boxing  Salvador  Sanchez 
Added: 10th June 2010
Views: 1080
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eighteenth Amendment Passed On January 16, 1919, the required 36 out of 48 states had ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution The result: Prohibition would come into effect a year later. A newspaper of the day heralds the news. In 1933, America's great social experiment ended when Twenty-First Amendment rescinded the Eighteenth Amendment.
Tags: Prohibition  legislation 
Added: 12th February 2011
Views: 2494
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Posted By: Lava1964

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