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Sad Final Years of Jerry Quarry Jerry Quarry was an extremely popular heavyweight fighter whose best years unfortunately coincided with the heydays of both Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. Quarry was a two-fisted slugger who possessed suprising mobility in the ring. A fine overall athlete, Quarry was a finalist in ABC's Superstars in 1974. His popularity landed him cameo appearances on TV shows such as Adam-12, I Dream of Jeannie, and Batman. However, Quarry's long career in the ring--he had about 200 amateur bouts and 66 pro fights--took a heavy toll. In 1983, six years after his last fight, Quarry and two other boxers volunteered to take neurological exams for a Sports Illustrated feature on the harmful effects of boxing. Although Quarry seemed perfectly healthy and alert, his test results were shockingly bad. By the mid 1990s, pugilistic dementia, commonly known "being punch drunk" had set in. This sad feature on Quarry was shot in 1995 when he was just 50 years old. He was under the care of his brother because he was unable to take care of himself anymore. Quarry was hospitalized in late December 1998 with pneumonia and died of cardiac arrest on January 3, 1999. He was just 53 years old.
Tags: boxing  Jerry  Quarry  pugilistic  dementia   
Added: 13th November 2013
Views: 1263
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Posted By: Lava1964
MSNBC - Tracking Hurricane John - 2006 From August 30th, 2006 on MSNBC, Viewing a report from Weather Plus Meteorologist Kristen Cornett about a category 4 storm of Hurricane John
Tags: Kristen  Cornett  Meteorologist  NBC  MSNBC  2006  Weather  Plus  Hurricane  John   
Added: 13th November 2013
Views: 925
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Romanov Remains Found Nicholas II, the last czar of Imperial Russia, was executed by communist revolutionaries in July 1918. He was murdered along with his wife, son, and four daughters in the basement of a house in Ekaterinburg where they had been under house arrest for several months. The whereabouts of their remains were unkown to anyone until 1979. Only after the Soviet Union collapsed did the outside world know of one mass grave that had been found. By 2007 all the bodies had been accounted for. This 2008 news report tells that modern DNA science was invaluable in the identification process.
Tags: Romanov  remains  czarist  Russia 
Added: 14th November 2013
Views: 615
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Weather Channel - The Enemy Wind Intro - 1992 Opening of the best documentaries of The Weather Channel about Tornadoes, The Ememy Wind in 1992
Tags: The  Weather  Channel  Enemy  Wind  Documentary  Open  Tornado  1992   
Added: 16th November 2013
Views: 559
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Umbrella Man - JFK Assassination It was sunny and 68 degrees Fahrenheit in the early afternoon in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Yet there was a man standing under an open black umbrella in Dealey Plaza not far from where bullets entered JFK's limousine. In this clip filmmaker Errol Morris interviews investigator/author Josiah Thompson who discusses the mysterious "Umbrella Man."
Tags: JFK  assassination  Umbrella  Man 
Added: 22nd November 2013
Views: 2205
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Posted By: Lava1964
Banned Snickers Commercial In 2008 this Snickers commercial featuring Mr. T aired briefly in Great Britain before being yanked off the airwaves after complaints by the homosexual community who claimed it encouraged violence against gays. Interestingly, most of the complaints came from the United States--where the commercial never aired.
Tags: Mr  T  Snickers  commercial  banned 
Added: 24th November 2013
Views: 1161
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Posted By: Lava1964
Failed Nungesser-Coli Flight 1927 Twelve days before Charles Lindbergh's famous first successful trans-Atlantic flight in 1927, two Frenchmen attempted the feat in the reverse direction but tragically vanished. Charles Eugène Jules Marie Nungesser and Francois Coli left Paris’s Le Bourget Airport on May 8, 1927, to fly across the Atlantic non-stop. They hoped to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize offered by a New York City hotelier while confirming France's place atop the postwar aviation world. The two co-pilots had been aviators in the First World War. Nungesser, a fighter pilot, had the third-highest rating for air combat victories amongst French pilots. François Coli was also an ace pilot who commanded a wartime squadron even though he had lost an eye while serving in the French infantry. They set off in the Levasseur PL.8 biplane – a fixed-wing aircraft with two superimposed main wings – named l’Oiseau Blanc (The White Bird) to fly the 3,600 miles from Paris to New York City without halting. The cockpit had been enlarged so that both could fit in. Their task was more difficult than Lindbergh's because they were flying into the wind and thus required more fuel. Their plane carried 11,000 pounds and barely got off the ground. Initial news reports circulated in France that the aviators had safely landed in New York, causing joyous celebrations to erupt in Paris. However, those reports were completely untrue: Nungesser and Coli’s plane disappeared somewhere over the Atlantic. The last verified sighting was when l’Oiseau Blanc was seen near Etretat off the coast of Upper Normandy. The twosome's flight plan would have taken them across southern England, then across Ireland to the Canadian coast and from there down to New York City. There were unverified reports of l’Oiseau Blanc being seen near Ireland and being heard near Newfoundland and the French islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon. Nevertheless, no sign of the airplane has ever been found. Three attempts to find wreckage--the last one occurring in June 2012--have all resulted in nothing.
Tags: aviation  Nungesser  and  Coli 
Added: 24th November 2013
Views: 845
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1663
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Posted By: Lava1964
Robert E Lee Citizenship Restored - 1975 When General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to General U.S. Grant on April 9, 1865 to effectively end the Civil War, one of the terms of surrender was that Confederate soldiers would have their U.S. citizenships automatically restored. When Andrew Johnson became president following Abraham Lincoln's assassination, he changed the rules slightly. Fourteen special cases had to apply directly to the President to have their citizenships restored. One such case was Robert E. Lee. Lee wrote to President Johnson on June 13, saying in part: "Being excluded from the provisions of amnesty & pardon contained in the proclamation of the 29th Ulto; I hereby apply for the benefits, & full restoration of all rights & privileges extended to those included in its terms. I graduated at the Mil. Academy at West Point in June 1829. Resigned from the U.S. Army April '61. Was a General in the Confederate Army, & included in the surrender of the Army of N. Va. 9 April '65." Consequently, Lee was provided with an Amnesty Oath form, which he filled out, dated October 2, 1865--the same day he was sworn in as president of Washington College in Lexington, VA–-and sent the signed document to the nation's capital. Lee's application was received by Secretary of State William Seward who had no intention of following through with Lee's request. Lee died in 1870 without really knowing his citizenship status. A century passed. In 1970 Lee's application was found by chance by a National Archives clerk who was looking through old State Department files. Since Lee had made the proper application to restore his citizenship, there was no reason to deny it. After Congress made Lee's old application something of a special cause, President Gerald Ford formally restored Lee's citizenship at a ceremony at his former mansion in Arlington, VA on August 5, 1975. Among those on hand for the occasion was Lee's great-great-grandson R.E. Lee V.
Tags: Robert  E  Lee  citizenship  Gerald  Ford 
Added: 28th March 2014
Views: 910
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Posted By: Lava1964
Erin Moran Homeless-Not So Happy Days Sad to report that Richy Cunningham's little sister Erin Moran is reported homeless. The Fonz Henry Winkler is working to help her including getting work on Arrested Development. Just after Happy Day's end Erin accused Winkler of molesting her. She later apologized and Winkler accepted her apology. Heeey! What a guy!
Tags: Erin  Moran  Homeless  Not  So  Happy  Days  Henry  Winkler  homeless    The  Fonz  Richy  Cunningham 
Added: 27th November 2013
Views: 3577
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Posted By: Steve

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