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Brooklyn Dodgers Win 1955 World Series For 65 years the Brooklyn Dodgers lived in the shadow of their more successful neighbors, the New York Yankees. Fans of the Bums, a nickname lovingly bestowed on Brooklyn's ballplayers, suffered World Series losses to the Yanks in 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, and 1953. 'Wait till next year!' became an annual lament for Dodgers fans. Finally, on October 4, 1955, the seemingly impossible happened: The Dodgers beat the Yankees 2-0 in the seventh game of the World Series. This is the cartoon that adorned the front page of the next day's New York Daily News. It was an extension of the jubilation that pervaded Brooklyn that autumn day. Former Daily News writer Pete Hamill described that day for Brooklyn fans as being 'a combination of the Liberation of Paris, V-J Day, and New Year's Eve as car horns blared, trolley cars ding-dinged their bells, church bells rang, pots were beaten outside fire escape windows, kids and grown-ups leaped with joy and exultation. Next Year! It was true. This was Next Year! The Dodgers beat the script. No: they wrote a new one.'
Tags: baseball  Brooklyn  Dodgers  Daily  News  cartoon 
Added: 1st August 2010
Views: 2605
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lost Chaplin Film Discovered For years film historians were puzzled by Charlie Chaplin's claim that he'd had a bit part as a Keystone Cop early in his one-year stint at that famous studio in 1914. Despite the best efforts of silent screen buffs, Chaplin's claim could not be verified until 2010 when a print of A Thief Catcher surfaced in Taylor, Michigan. Film historian Paul Gierucki found the film by chance: The movie buff happened to be browsing in an antiques shop when he found the 16-millimeter reel hidden inside a chest. Originally thinking it was an unimportant Keystone comedy, Gierucki let the flick sit on a shelf in his home for months before deciding to view it. Partway through the film, two Keystone Cops make an appearance. The build, mannerisms and facial features of the smaller cop were undoubtedly Chaplin's. Chaplin's film career has been well chronicled by experts, so his surprise appearance in A Thief Catcher stunned Gierucki. He quickly shared his remarkable find with other silent film fans. Their research confirmed the one-reel comedy had been filmed in January 1914 and released the following month. Like many early silent films, it was believed to have been lost forever. A Thief Catcher was screened at a film festival in Arlington, Virginia in June 2010--presumably its first public showing in 96 years. (This is a frame of the film.) It is now rightfully included among Chaplin's filmography.
Tags: A  Thief  Catcher  Chaplin  Keystone  Cop  lost  film 
Added: 28th November 2010
Views: 1554
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Posted By: Lava1964
White Athlete SI Cover The December 8, 1997 issue of Sports Illustrated opened a can of worms with its cover story: What Ever Happened to the White Athlete? (The caption was strategically placed over a photo of the all-white 1956 Princeton basketball squad.) The story garnered all sorts of reactions--positive, negative, and everything in between. Among the most thought-provoking revelations in the article were those from a coach at a racially diverse high school who noted that very few white kids ever tried out for the school's basketball and football teams, but there was no shortage of whites who tried out for soccer, baseball, and volleyball.
Tags: SI  white  athletes  cover 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 1126
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Posted By: Lava1964
Taylor Dayne Interview on Tonight Show Interview before singing Heart Of Stone. What happened to Jay's voice??
Tags: Taylor    Dayne-Heart    Of    Stone    Jay    Leno    Tonight    Show    2008    of    a    1990    hit     
Added: 17th January 2011
Views: 2335
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2474
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Posted By: Lava1964
Heyyyy Nick -Scott Valentine Then and Now I was watching a Family Ties rerun the other night and wondered what ever happened to Nick Moore.
Tags: Heyyyy  Nick  =  Scott  Valentine  Then  and  Now  Family  Ties  Nick  Moore 
Added: 26th January 2011
Views: 3546
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Posted By: Cliffy
Gorgeous Tags: Gorgeous,  what  happened  to  beauty,  glamour  girls 
Added: 16th March 2011
Views: 1494
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Posted By: Cliffy
Second Attack on Pearl Harbor - 1942 Few American realize the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor twice during the Second World War. The second attack, on March 4, 1942, was hushed up by the military. The residents who lived in the area where the bombs fell were not even sure what had happened. Many believed it was a local defense battery practice. The intended target, Pearl Harbor, was miles away from where the Japanese bombs actually fell. Neverthless, less than 90 days after the famous December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, the Japanese attempted a second attack. On Wednesday, March 4, 1942 during the early morning hours, four 550-pound bombs were dropped on Mount Tantalus, a quiet residential section in Honolulu. The U.S. Military officials confirmed two enemy planes were responsible for the raid. The planes were Kawanishi H8K flying boats that launched from a spy base housed near the Hawaiian archipelago. There were no injuries reported or loss of life and only limited property damage. The bombs fell in a wooded section of the area, creating a large crater and shattering a few windows.
Tags: Pearl  Harbor  Second  Attack  war 
Added: 7th April 2011
Views: 5959
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Posted By: Lava1964
Florence Sally Horner Abduction Case Florence Horner (who answered to the name Sally) was the victim of a 1948 case of child abduction. It only merited regional coverage at the time. Had it happened today, it would surely be a national media sensation. In 1948, as part of a club initiation, 11-year-old Sally Horner stole a five-cent notebook from a dime store in Camden, NJ. Frank La Salle, a 50-year-old mechanic who had served a prison term for statutory rape, witnessed the theft and saw a perverted opportunity: He told Horner he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to 'a place for girls like you' if she didn't cooperate with him. La Salle abducted Horner and spent 21 months travelling with her from Camden to Atlantic City to Baltimore to Dallas and finally, to San Jose--all the while using Horner as an unwilling sex partner. LaSalle posed as Horner's father on their travels, even going as far as enrolling her in local schools under false names. While attending school in Dallas, Sally confided her situation to a classmate who urged her to contact the police. Shortly after relocating to a San Jose motor court, Sally confided her situation to another resident while Frank was away looking for a job and phoned her brother-in-law and older sister in Camden, asking them to 'send the FBI.' La Salle was arrested when he returned to motor court, but he claimed he was Florence's father. However, an FBI investigation found that Horner's true father had died seven years previously. La Salle was sentenced under the Mann Act to 30 to 35 years in prison. Literary scholars believe the Horner case at least partially inspired Vladimir Nabokov's famous novel Lolita. In fact, there is a reference to the Horner case in Part II, Chapter 33 of the novel. Nabokov also uses the adjective 'Florentine' to describe Lolita--likely an allusion to Florence (Sally) Horner. Like the fictional Lolita, Florence Horner died young: She was killed in a car accident near Woodbine, New York, on August 18, 1952. Two days later the Associated Press reported, 'Florence Sally Horner, a 15-year-old Camden, N.J., girl who spent 21 months as the captive of a middle-aged morals offender a few years ago, was killed in a highway accident when the car in which she was riding plowed into the rear of a parked truck.'
Tags: kidnapping  Lolita  Florence  Sally  Horner 
Added: 11th May 2011
Views: 4641
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Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 4338
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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