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DREAMS OF EVERYDAY HOUSEWIFE-GLEN CAMPBELL In answer to a private message I received.
Tags: GLEN    CAMPBELL    DREAMS    EVERYDAY    HOUSEWIFE     
Added: 3rd July 2009
Views: 1313
Rating:
Posted By: Laura
Featured Member   Roseann Hi Gang, My name is Roseann and I have been part of the YRT family for a little over a month. I grew up in the 50's in an Italian family. I have one brother and two sisters. I live in Syracuse, New York and have lived here all my life. Typical 50's story, got married right out of high school, had 5 children by the time i was 26 years old. Of course I did not live happily ever after like the fairy tales, but it was all good anyway. I was a stay at home mom and we pretty much lived a happy days existence. My husband owned a Big M supermarket so I had the luxury of staying home being a housewife and loved every minute of it. Divorced after 20 years of marriage. I am presently living alone with my 2 shih tzus. I have been blessed with a wonderful family. and thank you all for allowing me to be part of the YRT family. Love to all of you.
Tags: Featured  Member  -  Roseann 
Added: 16th May 2008
Views: 1249
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Our Gang - Miss Crabtree June Marlowe played the charming blonde teacher, Miss Crabtree, in six Our Gang comedies from the early sound period. Marlowe was born Gisela Goetten in St. Cloud, MN in 1903. She was a prolific actress in silent films during the 1920s, appearing in films opposite John Barrymore and Rin Tin Tin. Her career faltered with the introduction of talking pictures, and by 1930 she was starting to drift away from acting. Marlowe had a chance meeting with Our Gang director Robert McGowan in a Los Angeles department store. McGowan was searching for an actress to portray the teacher in the Our Gang comedies. After producer Hal Roach suggested that the brunette Marlowe wear a blonde wig to match the hair of the lead kid in the series, Jackie Cooper, she was given the part. Marlowe and Cooper were paired together in three Our Gang films: Teacher's Pet (1930), School's Out (1930), and Love Business (1931). Our Gang devotees refer to them as the 'Miss Crabtree trilogy.' She also played a small role in Little Daddy (1931). In addition to her work in Our Gang, Marlowe appeared in Laurel and Hardy's first feature film, Pardon Us (1931). After Cooper left the Our Gang troupe in 1931 to appear in MGM features, the Miss Crabtree character was used only twice more, in Shiver My Timbers (1931) and Readin' and Writin' (1932). In 1933, Marlowe married Hollywood businessman Rodney Sprigg and retired from motion pictures to become a housewife. In her later years, she suffered from Parkinson's disease, dying at age 80 from its complications on March 10, 1984.
Tags: June  Marlowe  Our  Gang  Miss  Crabtree 
Added: 3rd December 2009
Views: 3225
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1924
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Posted By: Lava1964

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