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Chicago with Earth Wind and Fire in Concert Full Concert! They are touring this year together!
Tags:   Earth  Wind  and  Fire  In  Concert  Chicago  Chicago  Transit  Authority  Robert  Lamm  Lee  Loughnane  James  Pankow  Walter  Parazaider  Jason  Scheff  Tris  Imboden  Keith  Howland  Lou  Pardini  Walfredo  Reyes,  Jr.  Maurice  White  Verdine  White  Philip  Bailey  Ralph  Johnson  Reggie  Young  Gary  Bias  B.  David  Whitworth  Myron  McKinley  John  Paris  Bobby  Burns.  Jr  Greg  "G-Mo"  Moore  Kim  Johnson  Morris  O'  Connor  Philip  Bailey  Jr. 
Added: 8th May 2015
Views: 1134
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Don Drysdale Warns Greg Brady About Pro Baseball Some lessons from old TV sitcoms are timeless. Some aren't. In this clip from a 1970 episode of the Brady Bunch (titled The Dropout), recently retired superstar pitcher Don Drysdale warns Greg Brady that being a pro ballplayer isn't all it's cracked up to be. Considering what the average MLB player earned back then, he had a point. Today however...
Tags: Don  Drysdale  Brady  Bunch 
Added: 25th May 2015
Views: 1032
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Posted By: Lava1964
James Scott - Prisoner Boxer One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.
Tags: boxing  James  Scott  prisoner 
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1004
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Posted By: Lava1964
Little River Band - Cool Change Live 1981!
Tags: Little  River  Band  -  Cool  Change  70s  Music  80's  Music  Classic  Soft  Rock  Adult  Contemporary  Wayne  Nelson  Greg  Hind  Chris  Marion  Rich  Herring  Ryan  Ricks 
Added: 29th September 2015
Views: 868
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Chuck Hughes - 1971 NFL Fatality Despite its obvious inherent violence, the National Football League has only ever had one fatality occur on the field since it first began play in 1921--and it occurred from an undiagnosed heart ailment rather than from a bone-jarring collision. On October 24, 1971, Chuck Hughes of the Detroit Lions died during the final two minutes of a home game at Tiger Stadium versus the Chicago Bears. Hughes was born in Pennsylvania in 1943 but grew up in Texas with his 14 siblings. He set several school records for pass receiving at Texas Western University. He had spotty NFL career that began with the Philadelphia Eagles. By 1971 Hughes was used mostly as a special teams player and occasionally at wide receiver. On that fateful day Hughes collapsed while returning to the Lions' huddle following a play that did not involve him. Before his collapse it had been a very uneventful game for Hughes. The Bears held a 28-23 lead in a see-saw battle when the Lions got the ball back for one last drive toward the end zone. With under two minutes to go, Lions' quarterback Greg Landry dropped back and found Hughes on a crossing pattern for a 32-yard gain. He was sandwiched and brought down by two Bear defenders at the Chicago 37-yard line. Unhurt, Hughes popped up immediately and ran back to the Detroit huddle. It was the fifteenth and last catch of Chuck Hughes' career. After two straight incompletions Hughes was walking slowly back to the line of scrimmage when he suddenly grabbed his chest and fell to the ground. Some fans initially thought that Hughes might be faking an injury to give the Lions more time to devise their next play. But everyone in the stadium quickly became aware that something was terribly wrong when they saw Chicago's Dick Butkus waving his arms frantically at the Detroit bench and yelling for help. Team doctors Edward Guise and Richard Thompson rushed onto the field in an attempt to revive the lifeless Hughes. Guise began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while Thompson performed CPR. They were joined by Dr. Eugene Boyle, an anesthesiologist from Gross Pointe, MI, who descended from the stands. It was all to no avail. Hughes was pronounced dead at Henry Ford Hospital. He was 28. The photo of the incident shown here led many people to wrongly believe that Dick Butkus had administered a fatal blow to Hughes. Hughes' cause of death was declared to be a coronary thrombosis, which caused a massive myocardial infarction which cut off the blood flow to his heart. Hughes had had concerns about chest pains weeks before October 24, but a medical examination turned up nothing amiss. Hughes' family eventually sued Henry Ford Hospital for malpractice and was given an out-of-court settlement. Hughes left behind a young widow and a son who was not quite two years old. The Lions have retired Hughes' jersey #85.
Tags: NFL  fatality  Chuck  Hughes  1971 
Added: 23rd November 2015
Views: 1847
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Posted By: Lava1964
Greg Maddux HOF plaque Fails Grammar Test Greg Maddux was one of baseball's greatest pitchers. He is undoubtedly worthy of being inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. However, when his plaque was unveiled at the 2014 induction ceremony, grammarians gasped at a flagrant error in he inscription. His plaque states Maddux had "less than 1,000 walks" in his illustrious career. Because walks is a plural noun, the plaque should have read "fewer than 1,000 walks..."
Tags: Greg  Maddux  Hall  of  Fame  plaque  error. 
Added: 22nd May 2017
Views: 818
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Posted By: Lava1964

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