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Mean Joe Greene Coke commercial One of my favorite commercials: A Coke ad featuring Mean Joe Greene of the Pittsburgh Steelers. It first aired during the 1980 Super Bowl.
Tags: Coke  Joe  Greene 
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 2319
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
        Robin Hood  TV show 1955 to 1960 The Adventures of Robin Hood was a popular, long-running British television series that also aired in the US, starring Richard Greene as Robin Hood. Back in the early days of television, commercials were often built into the stories, as well as the opening and closing credits of the shows. This is an example of how it was done in the 1950's.
Tags: the  adventured  of  robin  hood  richard  greene  50s  television 
Added: 9th October 2007
Views: 3349
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 1663
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Coke Through the Years A variety of ads reflecting the historical development of Coca-Cola's tv advertising. Stop motion advertisement developed in the fifties and sixties, excerpts from the Hilltop video with an international group of young people on an Italian hilltop singing "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke", and the 'Mean Joe Greene' commercial. It must work....I'm getting thirsty!
Tags: coca  cola  television  advertising  through  the  years 
Added: 20th December 2007
Views: 1935
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
Suddenly Seymour Little Shop of Horrors 1986 Rick Moranis stars as Seymour Krelborn Ellen Greene as Audrey. 1986 film adaptation of the stage show Little Shop of Horrors. Song Suddenly Seymour. Ellen Greene has an amazing voice.
Tags: little  shop  of  horrors  suddenly  seymour  rick  moranis  ellen  greene 
Added: 23rd December 2007
Views: 2778
Rating:
Posted By: geminat
Battlestar Galactica promo 1978 A very brief 1978 ABC promo of the forthcoming debut of their elaborate and expensive science fiction series "Battlestar Galactica", starring Richard Hatch, Dirk Benedict and Lorne Greene. Ernie Anderson provides the voice over for the promo spot. The series was recently remade and extensively revamped to great acclaim, with a large cast spearheaded by Edward James Olmos, Mary McDonnell, Jamie Bamber, Tricia Helfer, Michael Hogan, James Callis and Katee Sackhoff.
Tags: Battlestar  Galactica  TV  television  1970s  1978  promo  ABC  cylon  science  fiction  sf  Ernie  Anderson 
Added: 7th July 2009
Views: 2407
Rating:
Posted By: robatsea
The Great Gazoo Partway through the final season of The Flintstones, a new character was added to the animated sitcom: The Great Gazoo. Gazoo was a tiny, green, floating alien who possessed magical powers. He was exiled to Earth from his home on planet Zatox as punishment for having invented a doomsday machine, a weapon of immense destructive power. Gazoo was discovered by Fred and Barney when his flying saucer crashed near Fred's car. Gazoo referred to Fred and Barney as 'dum-dums.' Gazoo secretly befriended Fred and Barney but constantly caused problems for them. Gazoo's name derived from the lyrics of a 1909 song, 'King of the Bungaloos,' by Charles Straight and Gene Greene. Harvey Korman provided The Great Gazoo's voice. Because Gazoo was introduced into The Flintstones midway through the sixth and final season (in the October 29, 1965 episode titled 'The Great Gazoo'), Gazoo's inclusion is often cited by fans of the show as the moment the series 'jumped the shark.' In total, The Great Gazoo appeared in 10 episodes of The Flintstones.
Tags: Flintstones  Great  Gazoo 
Added: 17th November 2009
Views: 1998
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 2994
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple-Graham Greene Lawsuit Before Graham Greene became a famous novelist, he was a freelance writer and critic for several British publications. In 1937, his review of the Shirley Temple movie Wee Willie Winkie in the magazine Night and Day outraged the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Greene basically described the nine-year-old Temple as sexually provocative. Wrote Greene, 'Infancy is [Temple’s] disguise, her appeal is secret and adult with the seductiveness of a [Marlene] Dietrich...Her well-developed rump twists in a tap-dance...She measures a man with agile studio eyes and dimpled depravity. Her admirers-–middle-aged men and clergymen-–respond to her dubious coquetry and well-shaped and desirable little body...Hear the gasp of her antique audience. Some of her popularity seems to rest on an oddly precocious body as voluptuous in grey flannel trousers as Miss Dietrich’s.' 20th Century Fox sued Night and Day on behalf of their star actress and won a judgment of 3,500 British pounds. The lawsuit bankrupted the magazine.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Graham  Greene  lawsuit 
Added: 18th January 2011
Views: 3544
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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