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Did You Ever Have One Pet Rocks were a 1970s fad conceived in Los Gatos, California by an advertising executive, Gary Dahl. The first Pet Rocks were ordinary gray pebbles bought at a builder's supply store and marketed as if they were live pets. The fad lasted only about six months, ending with the Christmas season in December 1975; but in its short run, the Pet Rock made Dahl a millionaire
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Added: 4th September 2007
Views: 1045
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Posted By: Old Fart
Side Step The Tragedy That Overtakes So Many Wives This ad for Dorothy Gray Salons begins with the subhead, "You may side-step the tragedy that overtakes so many wives..."
Tags: ad  Dorothy  Gray  wrinkle  cream 
Added: 1st November 2007
Views: 1093
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Posted By: Teresa
Dobie Gray   Out On The Floor This is probably the single biggest and most acclaimed Northern Soul record of all time. This performance was filmed for 'The Strange World Of Northern Soul' in Nashville, in early 1999. Dobie is otherwise best known for his 1965 'The In Crowd' and 1973's 'Drift Away.' He was a versatile vocalist who could handle soul, country, and pop. 'Out On The Floor' remains his most beloved soul anthem.
Tags: dobie  grey  out  on  the  floor  drift  away  the  in  crowd  northern  soul 
Added: 18th December 2007
Views: 1066
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Posted By: Babs64
Pete Gray One-Armed Ballplayer During the Second World War, most able-bodied young American males were in the armed forces. That left the old and the infirmed to play pro baseball. The most obvious example of this was Pete Gray who played in 77 games in his lone major league season for the St. Louis Browns. The one-armed outfielder batted .218 in 1945.
Tags: Pete  Gray  one-armed  ballplayer 
Added: 14th March 2009
Views: 1177
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Posted By: Lava1964
My 1974 Corvette Stingray Tags:  
Added: 19th March 2008
Views: 622
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Posted By: d55lane
Star Trek UFO My mash up of Star Trek and the British sci-fi series UFO. While the original open for Star Trek is one of the greatest ever done, I thought it would be fun to use Barry Gray's UFO music to create an alternate opening. I have had this on YouTube for a couple of years now and it has been well received. I hope you enjoy it too.
Tags: Star  Trek  UFO  Barry  Gray   
Added: 18th June 2008
Views: 834
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Posted By: BadWX
Jan and Dean  Baby Talk Jan Berry and Dean Torrence first became friends on the football team at L.A.'s University High, but Dean's first success came with Arnie Ginsburg (not the Boston DJ the duo scored a big doo-wop hit as Jan and Arnie with 1958's "Jennie Lee." That song, actually written about a stripper, gained Berry some friends in the business, including Herb Alpert and producer Lou Adler. Together with friend Torrence, who'd just returned from an Army stint, they developed a song called "Baby Talk." It was a smash, but it wasn't until 1963, with the release of the Four Seasons' inspired "Linda," that the Jan and Dean sound began to take shape. After meeting the Beach Boys on the L.A. scene, Jan befriended leader Brian Wilson, and thw two began work on what would become "Surf City." Inspired by the local scene and Wilson's very recent hits, "Surfin'" and "Surfin' Safari" -- and benefiting from Berry's amazing self-taught production skills, it went straight to Number One. The duo of Jan and Dean flourished well into the mid-sixties, weathering even the British Invasion. But on April 12, 1966, Berry's Stingray slammed into a parked gardener's truck (not at the site mentioned in "Dead Man's Curve," despite legend), and Jan entered a decade-long nightmare of physical recovery, drug abuse, and depression. By the mid-Seventies, amazingly, Berry could perform almost at normal, and the duo began an amazing comeback that lasted well into the mid-Eighties. Berry passed away in 2004.
Tags: jan  and  dean  baby  talk  60s  rock  and  roll 
Added: 15th August 2008
Views: 997
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Posted By: Naomi
Double Life of Arthur Irwin Toronto's Arthur Irwin was the man who invented the baseball gove. In 1884, while playing with the National League's Providence Grays, Irwin broke two fingers on his catching hand. In order to keep playing, he wore a carriage driver's glove filled with cotton. At first Irwin was derided as a sissy, but within a decade almost all major leaguers were wearing gloves in the field. However, Irwin is most famous for the double life he led as a bigamist--one that only became known after he died. On July 16, 1921, Irwin was aboard a New York to Bston ship, the Calvin Murphy. He told a fellow passenger he was going home to Boston to die. The next morning, Irwin was nowhere to be found. It was surmised that he either jumped or fell overboard. Irwin left behind a grieving wife and family in Boston--and a grieving wife and family in New York City! Neither family had any inkling of the other's existence. Irwin's body was never found, leading to speculation that he had faked his death. For years there were rumors he was living in rural Georgia under an assumed name. Irwin's sister answered the accusations by saying, 'With Arthur, you never know.'
Tags: Arthur  Irwin  bigamist  disappearance 
Added: 16th August 2008
Views: 1006
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Posted By: Lava1964
1879 Baseball Photo Before a National League game at Messer Park in Providence, RI in the spring of 1879, the defending champion Boston Redcaps pose with the Providence Grays for a group photo. The Grays would take the pennant that season. This is one of the sharpest photographic images from the early years of the NL.
Tags: baseball  photo 
Added: 31st March 2011
Views: 969
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 635
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Posted By: Lava1964

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