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Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double – Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 1655
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Posted By: Lava1964
Franklin Canyon Park Myers Lake, as it was affectionately called in the The Andy Griffith Show it is the opening scene for the show. Located in Beverly Hills CA not North Carolina. This location has been heavily used by the television and movie industry over the past fifty years. It was the lagoon in Creature from the Black Lagoon and it was the pond in On Golden Pond. Some other shows you have seen it in are Bonanza, Star Trek, How the West Was Won, Lassie, Falcon Crest, Camp Runamuck, and Rambo to name a few!
Tags: Franklin  Canyon  Park,  Myers  Lake,  Andy  Griffith  Show,  Beverly  Hills  CA,  North  Carolina,  Creature  from  the  Black  Lagoon,    On  Golden  Pond,Bonanza,  Star  Trek,  How  the  West  Was  Won,  Lassie,  Falcon  Crest,  Camp  Runamuck,  and  Rambo 
Added: 4th February 2011
Views: 974
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Posted By: Cliffy
President Franklin Roosevelt Funeral I know this is long but the historical significance is so worth. A time capsule of the history itself, the dress style, transportation and buildings.
Tags: President  Franklin  Roosevelt  Funeral,  Vice  Pres.  Truman,  Warm  Springs  Georgia,  caisson,  Hyde  Park,  New  York,  Washington,  D.C 
Added: 29th March 2011
Views: 1806
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Posted By: Old Fart
Franklin Roosevelt In His Dress In 1884, when FDR was photographed at age 2 1/2, the times dictated that boys wore dresses until age 6 or 7, it was also the time of their first haircut. Ladies’ Home Journal article in June 1918 said, “The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.” Today’s color dictate wasn’t established until the 1940s, as a result of Americans’ preferences as interpreted by manufacturers and retailers.
Tags:  
Added: 15th April 2011
Views: 8481
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Posted By: Cliffy
Identify the Hall-of-Famers This photo, taken before the 1937 All-Star Game at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., shows seven future Hall-of-Fame baseball players on the American League team. Your task is to identify all seven. (The American League defeated their National League counterparts 8-3. President Franklin Roosevelt was in attendance and tossed the ceremonial first pitch.)
Tags: baseball  photo  identification  All-Star  Game 
Added: 25th June 2011
Views: 1042
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Sam Cooke - 1964 Popular singer Sam Cooke is best remembered for his million-selling 1957 hit You Send Me. The married Cooke was something of a serial philanderer and died a rather unseemly death at age 33 on December 11, 1964, at the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles from a fatal gunshot wound to the torso. The motel's manager, Bertha Franklin, said she shot Cooke in self-defense after he broke into her office and attacked her. However, the details of the case are still in dispute. Cooke's body was found in Franklin's apartment-office, clad only in a sports jacket and shoes, but no shirt, pants or underwear. The official police record states that Franklin fatally shot Cooke who had checked in earlier that evening with a young woman. Franklin claimed that Cooke had broken into the manager's office-apartment in a rage, wearing nothing but a shoe and a sports coat demanding to know the whereabouts of the woman who had accompanied him to the hotel only a few minutes earlier. Franklin told Cooke the woman was not in the office, but the enraged Cooke did not believe her. He violently grabbed her, demanding again to know the woman's whereabouts. According to Franklin, she grappled with Cooke and the two of them fell to the floor. She got up and ran to retrieve her gun. She said she then fired at Cooke in self-defense because she feared for her life. Cooke was struck once in the torso, and according to Franklin, he exclaimed, "Lady, you shot me!" before mounting a last charge at her. She said that she beat him over his head with a broomstick before he finally fell. He was mortally wounded by the gunshot. Franklin noted she fired the gun at least three times. Franklin and the motel's owner, Evelyn Carr, had been speaking on the telephone together at the time of the incident. Thus, Carr claimed to have overheard Cooke's intrusion and the ensuing conflict and gunshots. Carr called the police to request they go to the motel, as she believed a shooting had occurred. A coroner investigated the incident. The woman who had accompanied Cooke to the motel was identified as Elisa Boyer, who had also called the police that night shortly before Carr. Boyer had called police from a telephone booth near the motel, telling them she had just escaped being kidnapped. Boyer told police that she had met Cooke earlier that night and had spent the evening in his company. She claimed that after they left a local nightclub together, she had repeatedly requested that he take her home, but he instead took her against her will to the Hacienda Motel. She claimed that once they had rented one of the motel's $3 rooms, Cooke physically forced her onto the bed and that she was certain he was going to rape her. According to Boyer, when Cooke stepped into the bathroom for a moment, she quickly grabbed her clothes and ran from the room. She claimed that in her haste, she had also scooped up most of Cooke's clothing by mistake. She said that she ran first to the manager's office and knocked on the door seeking help. However, she said the manager took too long in responding, so, fearing Cooke would soon be coming after her, she fled the motel before the manager opened the door. She claimed she put her own clothing back on, hid Cooke's clothing, and went to the telephone booth where she called police. Boyer's story is the only account of what happened between the two that night; however, her story has long been called into question. Inconsistencies between her version of events and details reported by other witnesses, as well as circumstantial evidence (e.g., thousands in cash that Cooke was reportedly carrying were never recovered, and Boyer was soon after arrested for prostitution), invited speculation that Boyer may have gone willingly to the motel with Cooke, then slipped out of the room with Cooke's clothing in order to rob him, rather than to escape an attempted rape.
Tags: Sam  Cooke  death 
Added: 15th December 2012
Views: 1720
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bonnie Franklin Bonnie Franklin, 'One Day at a Time' star, dies March 1, 2013, 4:14 PM EST NEW YORK (AP) -- Bonnie Franklin, the pert, redheaded actress whom millions came to identify with for her role as divorced mom Ann Romano on the long-running sitcom "One Day at a Time," has died. She died Friday at her home in Los Angeles due to complications from pancreatic cancer, family members said. She was 69. Her family had announced she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in September. Franklin was a veteran stage and television performer before "One Day At a Time" made her a star.
Tags: One  Day  at  a  time  bonnie  franklin   
Added: 3rd March 2013
Views: 828
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Posted By: LPROUD
Brenda Russell - So Good So Right Tags: Brenda  Russell  -  So  Good  So  Right  The  Midnight  Special      Diana  Ross,  Stevie  Wonder,  Aretha  Franklin,  Earth,  Wind  &  Fire,  Joni  Mitchell,  Donna  Summer,  Bingo  Players,  Flo  Rida 
Added: 9th October 2014
Views: 412
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Vanishing TV Character - Ginny Wroblicki One Day at a Time was a CBS sitcom that garnered decent ratings during its nine-year run from 1975 through 1984. The show's premise was that a new divorcee, Ann Romano (played by Bonnie Franklin), had relocated to Indianapolis with her two daughters to begin life anew. A brash character named Ginny Wroblicki joined the cast in the show's second season as the family's apartment-building neighbor. Wroblicki (played by Mary Louise Wilson) was described by Total Television as a "brassy cocktail waitress." In her first appearance on the show, Wroblicki initially quarrels with Ann without much provocation, but in the end Wroblicki helps Ann thwart a dishonest, fly-by-night upholstering business that was trying to overcharge her. In a couple of episodes Wroblicki was the romantic interest of Dwayne Schneider, the macho apartment superintendent (played by Pat Harrington). Wroblicki's character got mixed reviews. Some fans liked her in-your-face persona while others found it too overbearing and unappealing. (One critic said Wroblicki was "mannish." Another said she "looked like she had been around the block about 10 times.") She vanished after the 1976-77 season never to be heard from again. According to some scuttlebutt, Bonnie Franklin convinced CBS to dump the Ginny Wroblicki character from the show because she feared Wilson was upstaging her.
Tags: Ginny  Wroblicki  One  Day  at  a  Time  sitcom 
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 2189
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Posted By: Lava1964
Polio Ward Photo This photo from the 1930s shows a hospital's polio ward where children were placed in iron lungs to assist their breathing. Polio epidemics were a frequent occurrence in the first half of the 20th century in industrialized countries. They were actually a strange bi-product of affluence. By the beginning of the 20th century, a significant amount of babies were being born in the antiseptic conditions of hospitals rather than at home. This meant that many infants were not exposed to the polio virus and thus did not build up an immunity to it. Therefore when they were exposed to it later in life, they were vulnerable. Although the disease mostly afflicted children, adults were not necessarily immune. (President Franklin Roosevelt was crippled by polio at age 39.) The polio virus moved from one person to the next via human bodily fluids. Children who sneezed and coughed were the main culprits. The first symptoms varied. Sometime people had runny noses, sore throats, or aches. However, the minor discomforts could quickly change to partial paralysis if it struck one's central nervous system. Whenever a major polio outbreak hit, many public facilities such as swimming pools and parks would shut down. The last major outbreak occurred in 1952. By the mid-1950s the Salk and Saban vaccines had done much to eradicate the virus from North America.
Tags: polio  ward  photo 
Added: 16th June 2015
Views: 562
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Posted By: Lava1964

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