Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Captain Pugwash captain pugwash first screened on british TV in 1957. He was the master of the Black Pig, is a rotund and somewhat less than fearsome pirate, who nevertheless engages in the usual piratical activies involving lost treasures and so forth. His arch enemy is Cut-Throat Jake, captain of The Flying Dustbin. Despite his blustering optimism and self-importance, Pugwash is usually unobtrusively saved from catastrophe by Tom the Cabin Boy.
Tags:  
Added: 8th July 2007
Views: 1894
Rating:
Posted By: konifur
Every Mothers Son Come On Down To My Boat My best friend changed the lyrics to a four letter word that wasn't boat and so forth it was genius to a prepubescent boy.
Tags: Bubblegum    sixties    Archies    Garange    Band 
Added: 30th December 2007
Views: 1328
Rating:
Posted By: tommy7
Blackadder Goes Forth - Final Scene In a way this is the British equivalent of the final episode of MASH. MASH ended happily with the characters returning stateside. Blackadder Goes Forth didn't end so happily. The irreverent mini-sitcom comprised of just six episodes was set amid the chaos and horrors of the First World War's trenches. Rowan Atkinson played company leader Captain Blackadder. This poignant final scene fom 1989, often called the most memorable in British television, has the cast regulars preparing themselves to go 'over the top' to face certain death.
Tags: Blackadder  Goes  Forth  final  scene 
Added: 4th March 2009
Views: 11960
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Battlestar Galactica promo 1978 A very brief 1978 ABC promo of the forthcoming debut of their elaborate and expensive science fiction series "Battlestar Galactica", starring Richard Hatch, Dirk Benedict and Lorne Greene. Ernie Anderson provides the voice over for the promo spot. The series was recently remade and extensively revamped to great acclaim, with a large cast spearheaded by Edward James Olmos, Mary McDonnell, Jamie Bamber, Tricia Helfer, Michael Hogan, James Callis and Katee Sackhoff.
Tags: Battlestar  Galactica  TV  television  1970s  1978  promo  ABC  cylon  science  fiction  sf  Ernie  Anderson 
Added: 7th July 2009
Views: 2086
Rating:
Posted By: robatsea
1978 World Cup Soccer Fix The 1978 World Cup tournament was held in Argentina during the era when a brutal military junta ruled the South American country. Fearing for their safety, two of the world's best players (Holland's Johann Cruyff and West Germany's Franz Beckenbauer) both boycotted the tourney. The most controversial match pitted the host Argentines versus Peru. The Peruvians were already mathematically eliminated. Argentina had to win by at least four goals to overtake Brazil in the pool standings and qualify to meet the Dutch in the final. Peru put forth an effort so dismal in a 6-0 defeat that the Peruvian players bought newspaper ads in Lima to insist the match hadn't been fixed. Years later, after the junta was toppled, documents indicated that about $50 million was paid by the Argentine government to top Peruvian soccer officials to get the desired result. Argentina defeated Holland in the final.
Tags: soccer  1978  World  Cup  Argentina  Peru 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 2124
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chessboxing Invented - 2003 Yes, this is real! Chessboxing is a rapidly growing sport, most popular in Europe, that combines the brain power of chess and the physical violence of boxing. Invented in 2003, a chessboxing match begins with two minutes of chess, followed by two minutes of boxing, and then back to chess, then boxing, and so forth. A match can last up to 11 rounds. It ends with either a checkmate or a knockout.
Tags: chessboxing 
Added: 25th April 2010
Views: 996
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Nevada Mid-Air Crash - 1958 It's is hard to imagine today, but as late as 1958 civilian air traffic control in the United States operated independently from military air traffic control with neither group thinking it was absolutely necessary to share information with the other. The result was inevitable: On April 21, 1958, a military training plane collided with a civilian DC-7 passenger airliner just outside of Las Vegas, killing all 49 people on both aircraft. The passenger plane, United Airlines flight 736, was traveling from Los Angeles to New York and was headed to a scheduled stopover in Denver. An investigation later showed that the training plane went into a planned dive and clipped its right wing into the passenger plane's right wing. Both planes plummeted violently to the ground within seconds into an area of desert. The end result was that the FAA was henceforth given full authority to monitor all air traffic to prevent future calamities. It is still the worst air disaster ever to occur in Nevada.
Tags: 1958  mid-air  collision  Nevada 
Added: 10th December 2014
Views: 677
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Blackadder - How WWI Started History buffs will enjoy this clip: From the acclaimed British comedy series Blackadder Goes Forth, Captain Blackadder (who is wearing underpants on his head and has pencils stuck up his nose to try to prove he's too crazy to serve at the front) explains to Baldrick, his simple-minded batman, how the First World War started.
Tags: Blackadder  war  started  BBC  sitcom 
Added: 12th November 2012
Views: 3247
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1232
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Bub OCasey My Three Sons was one of televisions's longest-running sitcoms, airing 380 episodes over 12 seasons. It first aired on ABC from 1960 through 1965 and then on CBS from 1965 through 1972. The premise of the show was that Stephen Douglas (played by Fred MacMurray) was a widowed aeronautical engineer with three sons whose ages spanned about 12 years. We never learn much about his deceased wife--not even her first name. With Stephen Douglas often busy, his father-in-law, crusty but good-natured Bub O'Casey, was brought into the family fold to be the equivalent of the 'mother': the person who would cook, clean, shop, do laundry, mend clothes, and so forth. Bub was played by William Frawley who had earlier gained TV fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy in the 1950s. The show was immediately popular but never quite managed to crack the Nielsen top 10 in ratings. Fred MacMurray, who was once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, only agreed to be in the show if he could shoot all his scenes in three months. ABC agreed to this unusual demand. This meant the scripts for an entire season had to be prepared so MacMurray's scenes could all be shot over the space of three months and then pieced together with scenes involving only the other cast members who had a standard shooting schedule. Four seasons into the show, a problem arose: Frawley's health was declining to the point where ABC could not get him insured in case it had to pay for an entire season of episodes to be re-shot with a replacement if Frawley died or was incapacitated by illness. Thus ABC felt it was financially prudent to unceremoniously drop Frawley from the cast midway through the 1964-65 season. (It was explained that Bub had gone to Ireland to look after his 104-year-old Aunt Katie.) Enter William Demarest, who took on the role of Charley O'Casey--Bub's seafaring brother. He was persuaded to become the new Mr. Mom at the Douglas home and proved to be even more grumpy than Bub, but just as lovable deep down. Bub was seldom mentioned again once Uncle Charley entered the scene. Apparently Frawley resented Demarest for replacing him in the cast. Because only the 1965 to 1970 episodes are widely syndicated, many newer fans of My Three Sons are utterly unaware of Bub O'Casey. The insurance concerns were very valid: Frawley died suddenly in March 1966 at age 79.
Tags: Bub  OCasey  My  Three  Sons  William  Frawley 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 794
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random