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Dixie Riddle Cups Tags: Dixie  Riddle  Cups  Dixie  Cups  Lawrence  Luellen  Fort  James  Corporation 
Added: 5th April 2015
Views: 402
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
70s Dixie Cup Holder We had the same color in our house!
Tags: Dixie  Riddle  Cups  Dixie  Cups  Lawrence  Luellen  Fort  James  Corporation 
Added: 5th April 2015
Views: 1913
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
Polio Ward Photo This photo from the 1930s shows a hospital's polio ward where children were placed in iron lungs to assist their breathing. Polio epidemics were a frequent occurrence in the first half of the 20th century in industrialized countries. They were actually a strange bi-product of affluence. By the beginning of the 20th century, a significant amount of babies were being born in the antiseptic conditions of hospitals rather than at home. This meant that many infants were not exposed to the polio virus and thus did not build up an immunity to it. Therefore when they were exposed to it later in life, they were vulnerable. Although the disease mostly afflicted children, adults were not necessarily immune. (President Franklin Roosevelt was crippled by polio at age 39.) The polio virus moved from one person to the next via human bodily fluids. Children who sneezed and coughed were the main culprits. The first symptoms varied. Sometime people had runny noses, sore throats, or aches. However, the minor discomforts could quickly change to partial paralysis if it struck one's central nervous system. Whenever a major polio outbreak hit, many public facilities such as swimming pools and parks would shut down. The last major outbreak occurred in 1952. By the mid-1950s the Salk and Saban vaccines had done much to eradicate the virus from North America.
Tags: polio  ward  photo 
Added: 16th June 2015
Views: 562
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Posted By: Lava1964
Patterson-Rademacher fight 1957 The 1950s are often described as the golden age of boxing--when depth and talent were supposedly at their finest in the sweet science. People tend to forget that the heavyweight division was rather weak for much of the decade. Contenders for the world heavyweight title were so scarce that Pete Rademacher, the 1956 Olympic gold medalist, got a coveted shot at world heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's title in his pro debut! Having won the heavyweight laurels in Melbourne in 1956 by scoring three knockouts in his only three bouts, Rademacher, a Washingtonian, somehow persuaded the powers that be that it would be a great idea if he could fight Patterson in Seattle' Sick Stadium in a unique amateur-versus-pro matchup. Patterson agreed if the promoters could guarantee him $250,000. They did--so the fight was set for August 22, 1957. Surprisingly, Rademacher did well in the first two rounds, pressing the action and even scoring a knockdown with a hard right hand. By the fourth round, however, Patterson's class began to show. He scored one of what would be seven knockdowns of the game challenger. Eventually Rademacher was knocked out in the fifth round. The promotion barely generated financial enough interest to meet Patterson's guaranteed payday. Depending on which source you believe, Rademacher got either absolutely nothing or a laughable $1.75 for his losing effort. Undaunted, Rademacher fought hard-hitting Zora Folley in his next bout--and was knocked out again. Rademacher ended his pro boxing career with a 15-7-1 record. All seven of his defeats came at the hands of world-class fighters. As of August 2015, Pete was still alive and kicking at age 86.
Tags: Pete  Rademacher  boxing  amateur  Floyd  Patterson 
Added: 17th August 2015
Views: 586
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Posted By: Lava1964
Richie Cunningham - NFL Placekicker It can be an unfortunate or amusing coincidence when someone, quite by chance, has the same name of a celebrity or a fictitious character. Such was the case of of Richie Cunningham, an NFL placekicker who shared the name of Ron Howard's character from the TV sitcom Happy Days. The football-playing Cunningham was born in Houma, LA in 1970--four years before Happy Days hit the airwaves. He attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and did most of the kicking for the school's football team. Undrafted, he was signed by the Dallas Cowboys in 1994, but released. He was back with the Cowboys by 1997 where he enjoyed an outstanding rookie campaign. In 1998 he kicked 34 field goals to set a Dallas team record. On occasion, a snippet of the Happy Days theme would be played over the public-address system after Cunningham successfully booted a three-pointer. ESPN's Chris Berman, in doing the NFL highlight package, liked to say "Cunningham Potsied the ball through the uprights!" However, being an NFL kicker is a tenuous existence. Partway through the 1999 NFL season, Cowboys released Cunningham when his accuracy on field goals was just over 50 percent. By 2002 he was out of football altogether after stops in Carolina, Cincinnati, Jacksonville and Green Bay.
Tags: NFL  Richie  Cunningham  shared  name 
Added: 18th August 2015
Views: 749
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Best 1971 Hat-Trick The average American sports fan has probably never heard of George Best, but in the early 1970s, he was probably the best soccer player in the world. A resident of Northern Ireland, Best caught the attention of a scout for Manchester United at age 15 who reported that he had found a 'genius.' Best had incredible balance and could strike beautiful, creative, and powerful shots with both feet. In this clip from September 18, 1971 Best scores three goals for Manchester United versus West Ham United. (The third one is especially spectacular!) Unfortunately Best fell into a hedonistic lifestyle. He once joked that he had spent most of his fortune on booze, women and fast cars--and had squandered the rest! Best became an alcoholic and died way too young at age 59 in 2005.
Tags: George  Best  soccer  Manchester  United 
Added: 15th November 2015
Views: 460
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 1208
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Posted By: Cathy
Rainstorm Terminates 1976 NFL-College Game Several years ago I made a post regarding the annual "Chicago All-Star Game"--an NFL preseason contest that pitted the reigning champions versus a team of top collegiate all-stars. Played from 1934 to 1976, it was held annually at Chicago's Soldier Field. The gate receipts benefited various charities. Here's a 10-minute clip from the clash between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the College All-Stars in July 1976. Frank Gifford and Bud Wilkinson are calling the game for ABC. One of the most severe rainstorms you'll ever see at a sports event--combined with out-of-control fans invading the field--caused the game to be terminated late in the third quarter with Pittsburgh comfortably ahead 24-0. With NFL teams becoming less and less willing to risk their promising rookies for the sake of an exhibition game, the 1976 game was the last of the series.
Tags: rainstorm  NFL-College  All-Star  Game  football 
Added: 24th November 2016
Views: 453
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Posted By: Lava1964
SS Eastland Disaster - 1915 On Saturday, July 24, 1915 the S.S. Eastland, a Chicago-based passenger steamer ship, welcomed nearly 2,600 people aboard. Most were employees of the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne Works in Cicero, IL and their families. The Eastland was docked at a pier in the Chicago River. Passengers began boarding at 6:30 a.m. Their destination was Michigan City, IN--a three-hour trip across Lake Michigan for a day of fun and recreation at an enormous company picnic. The last passengers boarded the Eastland at about 7:10 a.m. At 7:28 a.m., still tied to the dock, the Eastland took on water, lurched dramatically to its port side (away from the dock) where most of the passengers had moved to, and quickly capsized. About one-third of the passengers--844 people--and four crew members were trapped within the doomed ship and were either crushed to death or drowned in 20 feet of water. How did the catastrophe happen? First, the ship was overloaded with both passengers and the weight of additional lifeboats mandated by new maritime safety laws. In previous trips that summer, the Eastland had carried 1,100 passengers at most. Second, renovations and additions to the Eastland has raised its height and dangerously shifted the ship's center of gravity. Third, the Eastland's ballast tanks were initially empty. If they had been filled before the passengers boarded, they could have provided more stable balance for the Eastland. Twenty-two entire families perished in the disaster. One notable person who had bought a ticket for the Eastland, but fortunately for him arrived at the dock too late to board the ship, was 20-year-old Western Electric employee George Halas. He had intended to play in the baseball game at the company picnic. Halas, after playing 24 games for the New York Yankees in 1919, would later be one of the key figures in founding the National Football League.
Tags: Eastland  maritime  disaster  Chicago 
Added: 27th April 2017
Views: 157
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Posted By: Lava1964

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