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Bell Canada Dieppe Commercial I might as well post the best Canadian commercial ever made: a Bell Canada spot that aired in the 1990s. A young man surprises his grandfather back home in Canada by phoning him from Dieppe. (It might need some explaining to non-Canadians unfamiliar with the Dieppe Raid during the Second World War. Nearly two full years before D-Day, on August 19, 1942, more than 6,000 Allied troops--the vast majority Canadian--were sent on an ill-conceived mission across the English Channel to the French coastal city of Dieppe. They landed on a beach with high tides, baseball-sized rocks that inhibited vehicles, and high cliffs heavily fortified by German machine guns. Their mission was to destroy enemy defenses and communications. It was an unmitigated disaster. Of the 6,086 troops who landed, 3,623 were either killed or captured. Historians argue about the raid's value to this day. Some claim it was a total waste of human life. Others say the costly lessons of Dieppe led to the successful Allied amphibious landings later in the war in North Africa and Normandy.)
Tags: Bell  Canada  Dieppe  commercial 
Added: 6th July 2013
Views: 1398
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Sad Final Years of Jerry Quarry Jerry Quarry was an extremely popular heavyweight fighter whose best years unfortunately coincided with the heydays of both Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. Quarry was a two-fisted slugger who possessed suprising mobility in the ring. A fine overall athlete, Quarry was a finalist in ABC's Superstars in 1974. His popularity landed him cameo appearances on TV shows such as Adam-12, I Dream of Jeannie, and Batman. However, Quarry's long career in the ring--he had about 200 amateur bouts and 66 pro fights--took a heavy toll. In 1983, six years after his last fight, Quarry and two other boxers volunteered to take neurological exams for a Sports Illustrated feature on the harmful effects of boxing. Although Quarry seemed perfectly healthy and alert, his test results were shockingly bad. By the mid 1990s, pugilistic dementia, commonly known "being punch drunk" had set in. This sad feature on Quarry was shot in 1995 when he was just 50 years old. He was under the care of his brother because he was unable to take care of himself anymore. Quarry was hospitalized in late December 1998 with pneumonia and died of cardiac arrest on January 3, 1999. He was just 53 years old.
Tags: boxing  Jerry  Quarry  pugilistic  dementia   
Added: 13th November 2013
Views: 1244
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1639
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bradford City Grandstand Fire - 1985 Here is video of a terrible sports calamity: On May 11, 1985, English soccer club Bradford City were celebrating their promotion from the third division to the second division, having mathematically clinched the championship with a week to spare. The final game of the 1984-85 season at Valley Parade Stadium was against Lincoln City. More than 11,000 spectators were on hand--about twice the home average that season--to witness the festive pregame ceremonies featuring the championship trophy presentation. Yorkshire Television, with John Helm providing the commentary, was present to record the match for a tape-delayed broadcast the following day. Everyone was in a jovial mood until about 40 minutes after the match began. A fire broke out underneath Section G of the wooden grandstand--an antiquated structure that had not been modified since 1911 and was slated for demolition at the end of the season. The blaze likely started from a discarded match or cigarette that fell through the grandstand's floor boards. Beneath the grandstand was an enormous amount of flammable material; the team used the area for storage of old programs, among other things. Because of windy conditions, within four minutes a huge fire had engulfed the grandstand. There were no extinguishers nearby and no easy way to exit the grandstand in the event of an emergency. Initially it appeared that everyone was able to escape the danger by jumping onto the pitch, but 56 people died and 265 others were injured. Most of the fatalities were fans under 20 years old or over 70. One victim was Sam Firth, the club's 86-year-old former chairman. Many fans perished near locked gates or in the washrooms under the stands. Wooden grandstands were outlawed at stadiums in the UK following the tragedy. There were many heroic actions during the fire. Some 50 fans later received commendations for their rescue efforts.
Tags: soccer  Bradford  City  Fire 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1392
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 1840
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Sad Decline of Benny Hill In 1990 The Benny Hill Show was airing in reruns in 97 countries around the world--but not in Great Britain where it had originated. The scourge of political correctness had forced Thames Television to end its association with Hill in 1989 after 20 successful years. Thames defended the move by saying Hill's periodic specials were becoming too costly, viewership was down, and the 65-year-old Hill was looking tired. However, by the late 1980s it was becoming unfashionable for Hill's sexually charged farcical comedy skits to be shown on British TV. (One anti-Hill crusader wildly blamed The Benny Hill Show for all the sexual assaults in the UK!) Hill did not need the money, but he did miss being on TV. He had open offers to appear in Las Vegas and name his price, but Hill did not want to make the journey overseas. Hill was a true loner who never married and was not known to have had a long-term relationship with anyone. The few friends he had said his dismissal by Thames was akin to handing Hill a death sentence. With assets worth more than 7.5 million British pounds, Hill was a bit of a miser. He never owned a car, he did his own shopping, and he lived in a very modest flat. He was also a slob. His flat was usually filled with dirty dishes, papers strewn everywhere, and dirty clothes on the floor. A friend once asked him why he threw his clothes on the floor. "Because they won't stick to the ceiling!" was his pithy answer. In February 1992, the 68-year-old Hill suffered mild heart attack. He was ordered to go on a diet. Two months later he died of another heart attack while sitting in a favorite chair in front of his television. His body was not discovered for three days. Hill's will had not been updated since 1961. The will's beneficiaries (his parents and his sister) had already died. The comedian's vast fortune was eventually split among nieces and nephews whom Hill had barely known. Among those who considered Benny Hill a comic genius were people as diverse as Charlie Chaplin, Michael Jackson and Walter Cronkite!
Tags: Benny  Hill  death  decline  comedy  UK 
Added: 29th October 2014
Views: 2392
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bill Clinton Dies Onstage (Booed) In 1988, then-governor of Arkansas William Jefferson Clinton made his national debut at the Democratic Convention when he endorsed Michael Dukakis for the nomination. Unfortunately, it was a very long speech that got cheers when he finally ended.
Tags: Elections 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 775
Rating:
Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Too Close for Comfort TV Show Too Close for Comfort TV Show
Tags: Too  Close  for  Comfort  TV  Show 
Added: 19th February 2015
Views: 704
Rating:
Posted By: dusman
Elusive Andy Griffith Show Character - Mr. Schwump The Andy Griffith Show has some of the most fanatically devoted watchers of any sitcom in history. Despite their zeal, no one has been able to positively identify the actor who played 'Mr. Schwump' in at least 26 episodes from 1964 through 1968. Actually, fans of the show can't even agree on the character's name. The late Everett Greenbaum, who wrote many of the scripts, claimed the character was actually written as 'Mr. Schwamp,' but it seemed to be pronounced as 'Schwump' whenever he was acknowledged. Whatever the case, Mr. Schwump was the classic background character: He can be seen in crowd shots at Mayberry's social gatherings, at public meetings, at private parties, at church services, sitting on a public bench, as a customer in stores, etc. He never once uttered a single line in any episode nor was he given any screen credit. He is only noteworthy at all because in several episodes Andy Taylor passes by him and says, "Hello, Mr. Schwump." It is generally acknowledged that he appears to be about 60 years old and wears a hairpiece. Efforts by zealous fans to find out who the actor was have proven fruitless. On April 1, 2012 an elaborate post was made on the Facebook page of The Andy Griffith Show Rerun Watchers Club declaring that researchers had determined Mr. Schwump was an actor named Patch S. Wimmers originally from Camp Threw, MS. Although it was supposed to be an obvious April Fools Day prank, many die-hard fans did not realize the information was bogus and still accept the Patch S. Wimmers story as gospel. None of the surviving cast members ever remembers learning Mr. Schwump's real name. One theory claims the mysterious actor was a friend of Andy Griffith and his occasional appearances in the show were an inside joke. Mr. Schwump's true identity remains unknown.
Tags: Mr  Schwump  Andy  Griffith  Show  sitcom 
Added: 4th March 2015
Views: 4481
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Bub OCasey My Three Sons was one of televisions's longest-running sitcoms, airing 380 episodes over 12 seasons. It first aired on ABC from 1960 through 1965 and then on CBS from 1965 through 1972. The premise of the show was that Stephen Douglas (played by Fred MacMurray) was a widowed aeronautical engineer with three sons whose ages spanned about 12 years. We never learn much about his deceased wife--not even her first name. With Stephen Douglas often busy, his father-in-law, crusty but good-natured Bub O'Casey, was brought into the family fold to be the equivalent of the 'mother': the person who would cook, clean, shop, do laundry, mend clothes, and so forth. Bub was played by William Frawley who had earlier gained TV fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy in the 1950s. The show was immediately popular but never quite managed to crack the Nielsen top 10 in ratings. Fred MacMurray, who was once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, only agreed to be in the show if he could shoot all his scenes in three months. ABC agreed to this unusual demand. This meant the scripts for an entire season had to be prepared so MacMurray's scenes could all be shot over the space of three months and then pieced together with scenes involving only the other cast members who had a standard shooting schedule. Four seasons into the show, a problem arose: Frawley's health was declining to the point where ABC could not get him insured in case it had to pay for an entire season of episodes to be re-shot with a replacement if Frawley died or was incapacitated by illness. Thus ABC felt it was financially prudent to unceremoniously drop Frawley from the cast midway through the 1964-65 season. (It was explained that Bub had gone to Ireland to look after his 104-year-old Aunt Katie.) Enter William Demarest, who took on the role of Charley O'Casey--Bub's seafaring brother. He was persuaded to become the new Mr. Mom at the Douglas home and proved to be even more grumpy than Bub, but just as lovable deep down. Bub was seldom mentioned again once Uncle Charley entered the scene. Apparently Frawley resented Demarest for replacing him in the cast. Because only the 1965 to 1970 episodes are widely syndicated, many newer fans of My Three Sons are utterly unaware of Bub O'Casey. The insurance concerns were very valid: Frawley died suddenly in March 1966 at age 79.
Tags: Bub  OCasey  My  Three  Sons  William  Frawley 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1332
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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