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Pete The Pup One of the most recognizable movie or TV pets was Pete The Pup--the dog from the Our Gang/Little Rascals series. Pete's father, Pal The Wonder Dog, was the original Our Gang dog. Pal had a nearly natural complete ring around its left eye. Makeup artist Max Factor simply completed the circle. Pal unfortunately died of accidental poisoning in 1930. Pete, one of Pal's offspring, assumed the role of the Our Gang dog--complete with a fake ring around its eye. Although more than one dog was used until the series ended in 1944, Pete The Pup had the longest career. Pete died at the ripe old age of 16 in 1946.
Tags: dog  Pete  The  Pup  Our  Gang 
Added: 10th September 2011
Views: 1379
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ayds Diet Candies Ayds was a brand name of boxed candies that were used as appetite suppressants for dieters starting in 1937. They were available in several flavors. Eating an Ayds candy was supposed to eliminate one's craving for a calorie-rich dessert. Ayds hit their peak of popularity in the late 1970s and had strong sales until the early 1980s. Then, unfortunately, the candies suffered the misfortune of having a name that sounded exactly like the disease AIDS. (This coincidence made some of the advertising pitches from the 1970s sound really bad: "Why go on a diet when you can have Ayds?") By the mid-1980s, sales of Ayds had dropped by 50% from their heyday just a few years earlier. The product's name was changed to Diet Ayds in 1987, but trying to persuade the public that Ayds had no connection to AIDS proved to be an uphill battle. By the end of the 1980s, the candies were discontinued.
Tags: Ayds  diet  candies  name   
Added: 30th September 2011
Views: 2745
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chick Stahl Mysterious Suicide - 1907 One of baseball's most peculiar mysteries was the suicide of Chick Stahl, the 34-year-old player-manager of the Boston Americans (later called the Red Sox), who took his own life on March 28, 1907 during spring training. Stahl's death by his own hand stunned the baseball world as Stahl was known as a happy-go-lucky fellow. The New York Times reported Stahl's death this way: WEST BADEN, Ind., March 29. Charles Sylvester Stahl, known to baseball "rooters" throughout the country as "Chick" Stahl, the center fielder, and until two days ago the manager of the Boston American team, committed suicide in his room at the West Baden Springs Hotel by swallowing carbolic acid. He was dead when found. President Taylor of the club, who succeeded Stahl in the management of the team, immediately ordered the practice of the men stopped. When Stahl arose to-day he was in his usual good spirits. He shared his room with his eldest friend, ex-manager Jimmy Collins, and when the time came for going to practice, Stahl was not on hand. After waiting some time, Collins went to the room, and Stahl told him he had just drank some carbolic acid. In a few minutes he was in terrible agony, and to some of the members of the team who Collins called to the room Stahl said: "Boys, I couldn't help it; it drove me to it." The players did not know what their comrade meant, but they did know he was worried about something, as they had taken away a bottle of carbolic acid from him only a few days ago while the team was at Louisville, KY. (One unproven theory for Stahl's suicide claims that Stahl was being blackmailed by a woman who became pregnant by him. Stahl had gotten married just four months earlier. His widow died only a year after Stahl's suicide.) A friend in Fort Wayne, IN--where Stahl was laid to rest in a funeral attended by thousands--committed suicide in the same manner on March 30, adding another layer of intrigue to the mystery.
Tags: baseball  suicide  Chick  Stahl 
Added: 5th December 2011
Views: 1593
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whitney Houston Dies at 48 Whitney Houston, who ruled as pop music's queen until her majestic voice and regal image were ravaged by drug use, has died at the age of 48 on Saturday, February 11, 2012. The singer was reportedly found in a bathtub in her hotel room at the Beverly Hilton hotel. At her peak, Houston was the golden girl of the music industry. From the middle 1980s to the late 1990s, she was one of the world's bestselling artists. She wowed audiences with effortless, powerful, and peerless vocals that were rooted in the black church but made palatable to the masses with a pop sheen. Her success carried her beyond music to movies, where she starred in hits like The Bodyguard and Waiting to Exhale. She had the he perfect voice, and the perfect image: a gorgeous singer who had sex appeal but was never overtly sexual, who maintained perfect poise.
Tags: Whitney  Houston  death 
Added: 11th February 2012
Views: 611
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Posted By: Lava1964
Herbert Hoover Cartoon Herbert Hoover was a brilliant orgtanizer of relief supplies for Europe during and after the First World War. Unfortunately for him, he is mostly remembered as the man who was president of the United States when the stock market crashed in 1929. The resulting Great Depression crippled the economy. Hoover's administration largely chose to wait things out, believing that the economic downturn would be short, and that government intervention was not necessary. He famously predicted in 1932 that, "Prosperity is just around the corner." Of course many grim years followed and it took pretty much until the end of the 1930s for the United States and the rest of the world to extricate itself from the Great Depression. This political cartoon (from 2005!) lampoons Hoover's unwarranted optimism.
Tags: Herbert  Hoover  cartoon  president  economy  Depression 
Added: 13th March 2012
Views: 7935
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Posted By: Lava1964
Murder of Bob Crane - 1978 Bob Crane will forever be remembered by TV fans as the actor who played Colonel Robert Hogan in the sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971. Crane was an amateur photographer. During the run of the show, co-star Richard Dawson introduced Crane to John Henry Carpenter, who worked with the video department at Sony Electronics and had access to early videotape recorders. Crane, a notorious womanizer, arranged for Carpenter to secretly and frequently photograph Crane's plentiful sexual escapades using this new technology. In 1978, Crane was appearing in Scottsdale, AZ in the play Beginner's Luck at the Windmill Dinner Theatre. On the night of June 28, Crane allegedly phoned Carpenter to tell him that their friendship was over. The following day, Crane was discovered bludgeoned to death in bed at the Winfield Place Apartments in Scottsdale. The murder weapon was never found--but police believed it to be a camera tripod. Crane was two weeks shy of his 50th birthday. Crane likely knew his assailant and was comfortable with him/her being in the room: He was known as a light sleeper and there were no signs of struggle. A bottle of scotch whiskey was found in Crane's room. Crane did not drink scotch. According to the program Cold Case Files, police at the crime scene noted that Carpenter called the apartment several times and did not seem surprised that the police were there. The car Carpenter had rented the previous day was impounded. In it, several blood smears were found that matched Crane's blood type. DNA testing, which might have confirmed that it was Crane's blood, did not exist yet. Due to insufficient evidence, Maricopa County Attorney Charles F. Hyder declined to file charges. The case was reopened in 1990, 12 years after the murder. A 1978 attempt to test the blood found in the car that Carpenter had rented resulted in a match to Bob Crane's blood type, but it failed to produce any additional results. DNA testing in 1990 could not be completed due to an insufficient remaining sample. Detectives Barry Vassall and Jim Raines instead hoped that additional witnesses and a picture of a possible piece of brain tissue found in the rental car (which had been lost since the original investigation) would incriminate Carpenter. He was arrested and held for trial after a preliminary hearing before a Superior Court judge who ruled that evidence justified a trial by jury. During Carpenter's 1994 trial, defense attorneys attacked the prosecution's case as circumstantial and inconclusive. They denied that Carpenter and Crane were on bad terms; they further said the theory that a camera tripod was the murder weapon was sheer speculation based on Carpenter's occupation. They also disputed the claim that the rediscovered photo showed brain tissue, and they noted that authorities did not have any such tissue. The defense pointed out that Crane had been videotaped and photographed in compromising sexual positions with numerous women, implying that a jealous person or someone fearing blackmail might have been the killer. Carpenter was found not guilty. He maintained his innocence until his own death on September 4, 1998. Bob Crane's murder remains officially unsolved.
Tags: Bob  Crane  murder  unsolved 
Added: 30th April 2012
Views: 4008
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 1295
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nevada Mid-Air Crash - 1958 It's is hard to imagine today, but as late as 1958 civilian air traffic control in the United States operated independently from military air traffic control with neither group thinking it was absolutely necessary to share information with the other. The result was inevitable: On April 21, 1958, a military training plane collided with a civilian DC-7 passenger airliner just outside of Las Vegas, killing all 49 people on both aircraft. The passenger plane, United Airlines flight 736, was traveling from Los Angeles to New York and was headed to a scheduled stopover in Denver. An investigation later showed that the training plane went into a planned dive and clipped its right wing into the passenger plane's right wing. Both planes plummeted violently to the ground within seconds into an area of desert. The end result was that the FAA was henceforth given full authority to monitor all air traffic to prevent future calamities. It is still the worst air disaster ever to occur in Nevada.
Tags: 1958  mid-air  collision  Nevada 
Added: 10th December 2014
Views: 751
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1585
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Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2063
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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