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West Side Baptist Church Explosion This is one of the great collection of coincidences of all time--or is it something else? You decide. At 7:27 p.m. on Wednesday, March 1, 1950 in Beatrice, Nebraska, the West Side Baptist Church was reduced to smithereens when its gas furnace exploded. The explosion should have resulted in serious injury and/or fatalities to the 15 members of the church choir who normally met at 7:25 p.m. on Wednesdays for practice. However, by a fortuitous series of coincidences, no one was in the building when it exploded because every one of the 15 choir members was uncharacteristically late for one reason or another: The pastor (who actually lit the furnace but had returned home), his wife and daughter were late, as the daughter's dress was soiled and the wife was ironing another. A high-school sophomore was late due to difficulty with her geometry homework. Two sisters were late because their car would not start--and their alternate ride was the member with the geometry problem. Another member and her daughter were late as she had to attend to matters at her mother's house before arriving. Yet another member was delayed while writing an important letter. One member waited until the last possible minute before leaving due to the cold weather. Another member was taking care of his two young sons and did not realize until the last minute he was late. The pianist had planned to arrive 30 minutes early but fell asleep after dinner, which caused her and her mother (the choir's director) to be late. Two high-school students were late because one wanted to hear the end of a radio program; the other waited for her as they customarily went to practice together. Makes you think, doesn't it?
Tags: church  explosion  choir  saved  coincidence 
Added: 5th October 2010
Views: 3304
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Posted By: Lava1964
Barbara Billingsley of Leave it to Beaver fame dies CNN) -- Barbara Billingsley, who wore a classy pearl necklace and dispensed pearls of wisdom as America's quintessential mom on "Leave it to Beaver," has died at age 94, a family spokeswoman said Saturday. The actress passed away at 2 a.m. (5 a.m. ET) Saturday at her home in Santa Monica, California, after a long illness, spokeswoman Judy Twersky said. A private memorial is being planned. "America's favorite mother is now gone. I feel very fortunate to have been her 'son,' " actor Tony Dow, who played Wally Cleaver, said in a statement. "We were wonderful friends and I will miss her very much. My deepest sympathies to her sons, Glenn and Drew, and her entire family." Actor Jerry Mathers, who played Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver, spoke of Billingsley's talent during a 2000 appearance on CNN's "Larry King Live." "Barbara was always a true role model for me. She was a great actress," he said. "And in a lot of ways ... we kind of stifled her, because her true talent didn't really come out in 'Leave it Beaver.' She was like the straight man, but she has an awful lot of talent." The actress won a new legion of fans in a brief but memorable scene in the 1980 send-up movie "Airplane." "Oh, stewardess. I speak jive," Billingsley said in her role as a passenger attempting to comfort an ill man on the flight. From the moment its catchy theme song sounded in black-and-white TV sets of the 1950s, "Leave it to Beaver" enthralled Americans during a time of relative prosperity and world peace. Its characters represented middle-class white America. June Cleaver dutifully pecked her husband, Ward (played by the late Hugh Beaumont), when he came home to learn about the latest foibles -- nothing serious -- committed by Beaver and Wally. The parents would dispense moral advice to their sons. The boys' friends included Lumpy and the obsequious Eddie Haskell, who avoided trouble and often buttered up Ward and June. "That's a lovely dress you're wearing, Mrs. Cleaver," Eddie would typically say to Billingsley's character. Perhaps fittingly, "Leave it to Beaver" was canceled in 1963 on the eve of the JFK assassination, the Vietnam War and the tumult of the 1960s. Born December 22, 1915, in Los Angeles, Billingsley began her career as a model in New York City in 1936. She was under contract to MGM in 1945 before becoming a household name with the launch of "Leave it to Beaver" in 1957. Billingsley is survived by her two sons, Drew Billingsley of Granada Hills, California, and Glenn Billingsley of Phillips Ranch, California. Asked once to compare real-life families to TV families, Billingsley responded, "I just wish that we could have more families like those. Family is so important, and I just don't think we have enough people staying home with their babies and their children."
Tags: Leave  it  to  Beaver  Barbara  Billingsly 
Added: 16th October 2010
Views: 1076
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Posted By: Carl1957
Lost Chaplin Film Discovered For years film historians were puzzled by Charlie Chaplin's claim that he'd had a bit part as a Keystone Cop early in his one-year stint at that famous studio in 1914. Despite the best efforts of silent screen buffs, Chaplin's claim could not be verified until 2010 when a print of A Thief Catcher surfaced in Taylor, Michigan. Film historian Paul Gierucki found the film by chance: The movie buff happened to be browsing in an antiques shop when he found the 16-millimeter reel hidden inside a chest. Originally thinking it was an unimportant Keystone comedy, Gierucki let the flick sit on a shelf in his home for months before deciding to view it. Partway through the film, two Keystone Cops make an appearance. The build, mannerisms and facial features of the smaller cop were undoubtedly Chaplin's. Chaplin's film career has been well chronicled by experts, so his surprise appearance in A Thief Catcher stunned Gierucki. He quickly shared his remarkable find with other silent film fans. Their research confirmed the one-reel comedy had been filmed in January 1914 and released the following month. Like many early silent films, it was believed to have been lost forever. A Thief Catcher was screened at a film festival in Arlington, Virginia in June 2010--presumably its first public showing in 96 years. (This is a frame of the film.) It is now rightfully included among Chaplin's filmography.
Tags: A  Thief  Catcher  Chaplin  Keystone  Cop  lost  film 
Added: 28th November 2010
Views: 1386
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Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Larson Beats Press Your Luck Press Your Luck was a CBS daytime game show that ran from 1983 to 1986. It was one of the first game shows to use computer technology. The heart of the game revolved around a large computer-generated prize board. There were 18 'randomly arranged' panels. On average, 15 of the 18 panels contained cash or merchandise prizes. The other three were 'whammies.' If a player stopped the rotating board on a whammy, he lost everything. If a player kept accruing spins, he could keep pressing his luck and accumulate as much money and prizes as he dared. Enter Michael Larson, an out-of-work ice cream vendor from Ohio. Using his VCRs, Larson taped numerous episodes of Press Your Luck and screened them in slow motion. Larson's study habits paid huge dividends: He recognized that the board only generated five patterns. If a player was smart enough to recognize the patterns and time his presses accordingly, a small fortune could be amassed. In a May 1984 taping, Larson did just that. To the amazement of host Peter Tomarken, a studio audience, his two opponents, and CBS brass, Larson made 46 consecutive spins without hitting a whammy. (The odds of such a feat, if it were pure luck, are about 5000 to one.) At a time when most game show winners took home less than $10,000, Larson won $104,950 in cash, a sailboat, and trips to Kauai and the Bahamas-- for a total haul valued at $110,237. Larson's run of whammy-free presses took so long that CBS had to air the show over two episodes (on June 8 and 11). At first CBS was reluctant to award Larson his winnings, but they had no legal grounds to withhold Larson's loot. He had beaten the system fairly. Immediately afterward, the Press Your Luck board patterns were increased to 32 making it much less likely that anyone could memorize them. To see a condensed version of Larson in action, check out another post on this website: http://www.yourememberthat.com/media/14367/Michael_Larson_on_Press_Your_Luck/
Tags: Press  Your  Luck  Michael  Larson  game  show 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 1772
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Posted By: Lava1964
US War Effort During WW II Tags: US  War  Effort  During  WW  II  Glenn  Miller  St.  Louis  Blues  March 
Added: 13th January 2011
Views: 1986
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Posted By: Old Fart
The Importance of Correct Spelling During the 2010 Illinois gubernatorial election, Green Party candidate Rich Whitney was the unfortunate victim of a spelling error on the electronic voting machines used at the advance polls. Whitney's surname somehow was misspelled without the 'n'--thus his name appeared on the screen as 'Rich Whitey.' Moreover, of the 23 advanced polling stations, 12 were in predominantly black areas. The 55-year-old Whitney was predictably miffed by the gaffe. Election officials apologized for the spelling error--which was noticed too late to be corrected--but stressed that 90 percent of Illinois voters typically cast paper ballots on election day--where Green's name was spelled correctly. Green finished a poor fourth in the election. He garnered less than three percent of the vote.
Tags: Rich  Whitney  election  Illinois  spelling  error 
Added: 17th January 2011
Views: 1058
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1485
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ali-Frazier I - 40th Anniversary Forty years ago tonight, March 8, 1971, the world came to a standstill: Undefeated world heavyweight champion Joe Frazier defended his crown in Madison Square Garden against former champion Muhammad Ali, also undefeated (having lost the title by a court order, not in the ring). Frazier won the titanic struggle in a 15-round decision. A vicious knockdown of Ali by Frazier's lethal left hook in the final round sealed the victory. In a complex social context, Frazier's victory was seen as a win for the 'establishment' and a defeat for society's non-conformists.
Tags: boxing  Ali  Frazier 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 1105
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Posted By: Lava1964
The 51st State of America-Jefferson--almost In October 1941, the mayor of Port Orford, Oregon, Gilbert Gable, announced that the Oregon counties of Curry, Josephine, Jackson, and Klamath should join with the California counties of Del Norte, Siskiyou, and Modoc to form a new state, later named Jefferson. The first blow was the death of Mayor Gable on December 2, followed five days later by the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7. Secessionists focused their efforts on the war effort, which crippled the movement
Tags: State  of  Jefferson,  Port  Orford,  Oregon,  Gilbert  Gable,  Curry,  Josephine,  Jackson,  and  Klamath,  Del  Norte,  Siskiyou,  and  Modoc,  attack  on  Pearl  Harbor,  Secession,Secessionists           
Added: 13th July 2011
Views: 1951
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Posted By: pfc
Four MLB Greats - 1928 This impromptu photo shows Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth before a New York Yankees-Philadelphia Athletics game in 1928. The photo may have been taken on Opening Day; the heavy jackets worn by Gehrig and Ruth suggest a cool temperature. Not a bad core of players to start a team, I'd say! (Imagine what their salaries would be today!) The A's gave the Yankees a darn good run for the AL pennant in 1928 but came up just a bit short, winning 98 games and finishing in second spot just 2.5 games out of first place. The Yankees took 16 of 22 games versus the A's in 1928. Speaker and Cobb were both winding down their spectacular careers that season. Some baseball scholars believe their advancing ages--they were both in their forties--may have been a hindrance to the A's. Speaker could no longer play center field effectively. He was used mostly as a pinch hitter by the middle of July and appeared in no games at all after August. The Athletics' younger stars (fellows like Al Simmons, Mickey Cochrane, and Lefty Grove) led them to three straight AL pennants from 1929 through 1931.
Tags: MLB  Cobb,  Ruth,  Speaker,  Gehrig 
Added: 9th December 2014
Views: 810
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Posted By: Lava1964

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