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(Ghost) Riders in the Sky "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky: A Cowboy Legend" is a country and cowboy-style song. It was written on June 5, 1948 by Stan Jones. A number of versions were crossover hits on the pop charts in 1949. The ASCAP database lists the song as "Riders in the Sky" (title code: 480028324), but the title has been written as "Ghost Riders", "Ghost Riders in the Sky", and "A Cowboy Legend". [#2 country, #1 pop, 1949] Bucky Pizzarelli and Don Costa were on the original recording session in Chicago. The song tells a folk tale of a cowboy who has a vision of red-eyed, steel-hooved cattle thundering across the sky, being chased by the spirits of damned cowboys. One warns him that if he does not change his ways, he will be doomed to join them, forever "trying to catch the Devil's herd across these endless skies". Jones said that he had been told the story when he was 12 years old by an old cowboy friend. The story resembles the northern European mythic Wild Hunt. The melody is based on the song "When Johnny Comes Marching Home". According to Robby Krieger, it inspired the classic Doors song "Riders on the Storm". The song was also the inspiration for the Marvel Comics Western character "Ghost Rider" later renamed Phantom Rider (not to be confused with the later character named "Ghost Rider").
Tags: Vaughn,  Monroe,  Riders,  In,  Sky,  Ghost 
Added: 29th June 2014
Views: 4097
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Posted By: 1jazzguy
Alphaville - Forever Young Tags: Alphaville  -  Forever  Young  synth-pop    new    wave    80 
Added: 30th November 2009
Views: 1285
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Posted By: Old Fart
James Bulger Murder Case 1993 One of the truly shocking crimes of the late twentieth century was the abduction and murder of two-year-old James Bulger in Liverpool, England. His killers were two 10-year-olds, Jon Venables and Robert Thompson, who committed the crime for no discernible reason. James wandered away from his mother, Denise, at the New Strand Shopping Centre on February 12, 1993. His mutilated body was found on a nearby railway line two days later. Thompson and Venables, who had skipped school, were photographed by a security camera leading Bulger away. They took Bulger two miles from the mall where they tortured him and bludgeoned him to death with bricks, stones, and an iron bar. The killers then placed the child's corpse on the railway tracks to make Bulger's death appear to be an accident. They were charged with Bulger's abduction and murder on February 20. The twosome were found guilty on November 24, 1993, thus becoming the youngest people ever to be convicted of murder in England. The trial judge sentenced them to be detained at Her Majesty's Pleasure, with a recommendation that they should be kept in custody for 'very, very many years to come,' recommending a minimum term of eight years. Shortly after the trial, the Lord Chief Justice ordered that the two boys should serve a minimum of 10 years, which would have made them eligible for release in February 2003 when they were both 20. The outraged British public felt the sentence was far too lenient. The editors of The Sun newspaper began a petition asking Home Secretary Michael Howard to increase the killers' time in custody. The petition eventually topped 300,000 signatures. This campaign was successful. In 1995 Howard announced the boys would be kept in custody for a minimum of 15 years, meaning that they would not be considered for release until February 2008 when they would be 25 years old. In 1997, the Court of Appeal ruled that Howard's decision was unlawful, and the Home Secretary lost his power to set minimum terms for life-sentence prisoners under 18 years of age. The High Court and European Court of Human Rights have since ruled that, though the parliament may set minimum and maximum terms for individual categories of crime, it is the responsibility of the trial judge, with the benefit of all the evidence and argument from both prosecution and defense council, to determine the minimum term in individual criminal cases. After a parole hearing in June 2001, Thompson and Venables were released on a 'life licence' after serving just eight years. The hearing concluded that 'public safety would not be threatened by their rehabilitation.' An injunction was imposed after the trial, preventing the publication of details about the boys, for fear of reprisals. The injunction remains in force, so their new identities and locations cannot be published (although this ruling only applies to the United Kingdom). They walk among us today, protected by legal anonymity. Meanwhile the hapless James Bulger remains two years old forever...
Tags: murder  James  Bulger  Jon  Venables  Robert  Thompson  Britain 
Added: 15th December 2009
Views: 3271
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alex Haley Plagiarism Scandal 1978 In 1978, Alex Haley, the renowned author of Roots, came under fire in a plagiarism lawsuit launched by a white anthropologist and fellow author Harold Courlander. Haley claimed he had spent a decade researching his heritage for his historical novel, which in 1977 was adapted as a wildly successful TV miniseries. That same year he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the Spingarn Medal for the book. A year later his reputation was forever marred. Courlander went to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York to charge that Roots was substantially plagiarized from Courlander's own book, The African. Courlander's witnesses included Michael Wood an English professor at Columbia University and an expert on plagiarism. Wood opined in a report that the evidence of plagiarism in Roots was 'clear and irrefutable' and that the copying of passages was 'significant and extensive.' After a five-week trial in federal district court, Courlander and Haley settled the case, with Haley making a financial settlement of $650,000 and a statement that 'Alex Haley acknowledges and regrets that various materials from The African by Harold Courlander found their way into his book Roots.' Haley claimed the appropriation of Courlander's passages had been unintentional. Haley orginally maintained he had never heard of The African, much less read it. Shortly after the trial, however, Joseph Bruchac, an instructor of black literature at Skidmore College, came forward to swear in an affidavit that in 1970 or 1971--five or six years before the publication of Roots--he had discussed The African with Haley and had given his 'own personal copy of The African to Haley.' In a later interview with BBC Television, Judge Ward stated, 'Alex Haley perpetrated a hoax on the public.'
Tags: Roots  Alex  Haley  plagiarism  scandal 
Added: 4th February 2010
Views: 13398
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Posted By: Lava1964
Art Fleming - Original Jeopardy Host 'Who was Art Fleming?' That would be the correct question to the answer, 'The original host of Jeopardy!' Fleming was an actor who had no experience as a TV host. Jeopardy! creator Merv Griffin saw Fleming in commercials and thought his 'authoritarian but warm' persona would be perfect for his new quiz show. Griffin's instinct proved to be right. Fleming's stint as host of daytime Jeopardy! on NBC ran from the debut broadcast on Monday, March 30, 1964 to its conclusion on Friday, January 3, 1975 and encompassed 2,753 shows. Fleming also hosted a nighttime version of Jeopardy! during its NBC years, plus two short-lived syndicated attempts to revive the show after 1975. He never missed hosting a single episode. Sadly, NBC saw no point in keeping the tapes of old game shows, so the vast majority of the original Jeopardy! shows were destroyed and are lost forever. Fleming died of pancreatic cancer in 1995 at age 70.
Tags: Art  Fleming  Jeopardy!  host  game  show 
Added: 25th March 2010
Views: 4065
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Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Johnson-This Night Wont Last Forever Micheal's Official website is: http://www.mjblue.com/
Tags: Michael  Johnson  This  Night  Won't  Last  Forever    1979  70s  1970s  music  classic   
Added: 3rd June 2010
Views: 1072
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Posted By: Music Maiden
I Love Lucy Pilot Episode Rediscovered I Love Lucy was the first American sitcom to be shot and preserved on 35-mm film, thus ensuring every episode could be shown forever in reruns. However, the pilot episode had mysteriously vanished after it had aired in 1951. For nearly four decades it could not be located, much to the frustration of the show's devoted fans. In 1990, the widow of Pepito Perez, a Spanish clown who had appeared in the pilot episode, announced the good news: She had found the missing episode while dusting under a bed in her home! Apparently Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz had given the only existing copy of the episode to her late husband as a thank-you gift--and quickly forgot about it. It had sat undisturbed in Perez's home for nearly 40 years. Perez had died in 1975. Both Lucy and Desi had also died by the time the pilot episode had been rediscovered. With only a slight bit of restoration needed to the film, CBS aired it as part of an I Love Lucy retrospective on April 30, 1990. Some notable differences in the pilot from the rest of the series: Lucy and Ricky's last name was Lopez instead of Ricardo; their apartment was markedly different; and landlords Fred and Ethel Mertz were nowhere to be seen. Lucy was quite obviously wearing maternity clothes in the pilot, although no mention was made of her pregnancy. The child in the womb was Lucy Arnaz--who hosted the 1990 retrospective show.
Tags: I  Love  Lucy  pilot  episode  rediscovered  Pepito  Clown 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 3068
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Posted By: Lava1964
Freestyle Forever Tags: Freestyle  Forever    Disco  80s  dance  music 
Added: 3rd November 2010
Views: 1161
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Lost Chaplin Film Discovered For years film historians were puzzled by Charlie Chaplin's claim that he'd had a bit part as a Keystone Cop early in his one-year stint at that famous studio in 1914. Despite the best efforts of silent screen buffs, Chaplin's claim could not be verified until 2010 when a print of A Thief Catcher surfaced in Taylor, Michigan. Film historian Paul Gierucki found the film by chance: The movie buff happened to be browsing in an antiques shop when he found the 16-millimeter reel hidden inside a chest. Originally thinking it was an unimportant Keystone comedy, Gierucki let the flick sit on a shelf in his home for months before deciding to view it. Partway through the film, two Keystone Cops make an appearance. The build, mannerisms and facial features of the smaller cop were undoubtedly Chaplin's. Chaplin's film career has been well chronicled by experts, so his surprise appearance in A Thief Catcher stunned Gierucki. He quickly shared his remarkable find with other silent film fans. Their research confirmed the one-reel comedy had been filmed in January 1914 and released the following month. Like many early silent films, it was believed to have been lost forever. A Thief Catcher was screened at a film festival in Arlington, Virginia in June 2010--presumably its first public showing in 96 years. (This is a frame of the film.) It is now rightfully included among Chaplin's filmography.
Tags: A  Thief  Catcher  Chaplin  Keystone  Cop  lost  film 
Added: 28th November 2010
Views: 1356
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Posted By: Lava1964
1960 World Series Kinescope Found In September 2010, baseball fans were thrilled by a remarkable dicovery: A complete kinescope copy of the seventh game of the 1960 World Series was found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar! How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the World Series against the New York Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. “He said, ‘I can’t stay in the country,’ ” his widow, Kathryn Crosby, recalled. “ ‘I’ll jinx everybody.’ ” He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game Seven by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski famously hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees 10-9 at Forbes Field. It is considered one of the greatest and most memorable ballgames ever played. Crosby apparently had more foresight than the television networks and stations, which sadly erased or discarded nearly all the Major League Baseball games they carried until the 1970s. A canny preservationist of all things, Crosby, who died in 1977, kept a half-century’s worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar-turned-vault in his Hillsborough, California home. “Bing Crosby was way ahead of his time,” said Nick Trotta, senior library and licensing manager for Major League Baseball Productions, the sport’s archivist. The kinescope was found quite by accident. A producer searching through Crosby's estate for material for a TV documentary on the late singer's career accidentally came upon five film cannisters marked '1960 World Series.' The 50-year-old game was first shown to a private audience in Pittsburgh that included surviving members of both teams. It was broadcast on the MLB Network in December 2010 and has since been made available to the general public on DVD.
Tags: 1960  World  Series  baseball  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 13th August 2011
Views: 1716
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Posted By: Lava1964

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