Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2264
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Party Lines Millennials will have trouble believing these ever existed, but at one time the majority of North American households did not have private telephone lines. Instead, they were serviced by party lines--basically one common telephone line that served numerous households. Party lines existed in urban areas where private lines were unavailable or expensive, but they are more frequently associated with rural areas where great distances separated neighbors and made private lines expensive for phone companies to install. As late as 1943, three-quarters of Pennsylvania's telephone customers had party lines. Party lines had certain advantages: Important community news could be relayed quickly to everyone who was connected, but of course there were major negatives too. Privacy was a virtual impossibility as anyone else who subscribed to the party line could eavesdrop on others' conversations. Also, there was the obvious problem of one subscriber hogging the line, preventing others from making a call. (If you look at Ann Landers-type newspaper columns from the first half of the 20th century, one person dominating the party line was a frequent complaint.) Phone companies responded by offering protocol tips to party-line users. Among the typical suggestions was a five-minute limit per call. Eavesdropping on others' phone conversations did lead to some amusing anecdotes. Criminal schemes were known to have been thwarted by listeners who heard crooks discussing their plans. One college football coach overheard his rival's plans on how to defeat his team in an upcoming game. Most telephone companies discontinued party lines toward the end of the 1970s.
Tags: party  lines  telephone  systems 
Added: 7th November 2016
Views: 1189
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Rainstorm Terminates 1976 NFL-College Game Several years ago I made a post regarding the annual "Chicago All-Star Game"--an NFL preseason contest that pitted the reigning champions versus a team of top collegiate all-stars. Played from 1934 to 1976, it was held annually at Chicago's Soldier Field. The gate receipts benefited various charities. Here's a 10-minute clip from the clash between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the College All-Stars in July 1976. Frank Gifford and Bud Wilkinson are calling the game for ABC. One of the most severe rainstorms you'll ever see at a sports event--combined with out-of-control fans invading the field--caused the game to be terminated late in the third quarter with Pittsburgh comfortably ahead 24-0. With NFL teams becoming less and less willing to risk their promising rookies for the sake of an exhibition game, the 1976 game was the last of the series. It was also the last game that Ara Parseghian ever coached. The former Notre Dame coach had retired after the 1974 season, but he was coaxed out of retirement to coach the College All-Stars in this game.
Tags: rainstorm  NFL-College  All-Star  Game  football 
Added: 24th November 2016
Views: 1218
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
SS Eastland Disaster - 1915 On Saturday, July 24, 1915 the S.S. Eastland, a Chicago-based passenger steamer ship, welcomed nearly 2,600 people aboard. Most were employees of the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne Works in Cicero, IL and their families. The Eastland was docked at a pier in the Chicago River. Passengers began boarding at 6:30 a.m. Their destination was Michigan City, IN--a three-hour trip across Lake Michigan for a day of fun and recreation at an enormous company picnic. The last passengers boarded the Eastland at about 7:10 a.m. At 7:28 a.m., still tied to the dock, the Eastland took on water, lurched dramatically to its port side (away from the dock) where most of the passengers were standing, and quickly capsized. About one-third of the passengers--844 people--and four crew members were trapped within the doomed ship and were either crushed to death or drowned in 20 feet of water. How did the catastrophe happen? First, the ship was overloaded with both passengers and the weight of additional lifeboats mandated by new maritime safety laws. In previous trips that summer, the Eastland had carried 1,100 passengers at most. Second, renovations and additions to the Eastland has raised its height and dangerously shifted the ship's center of gravity. Third, the Eastland's ballast tanks were initially empty. If they had been filled before the passengers boarded, they could have provided more stable balance for the Eastland. Twenty-two entire families perished in the disaster. One notable person bought a ticket for the Eastland. Fortunately for him, he arrived at the dock too late to board the ship. It was a 20-year-old Western Electric employee George Halas. He had intended to play in the baseball game at the company picnic. Halas, after playing 24 games for the New York Yankees in 1919, would later be one of the key figures in founding the National Football League.
Tags: Eastland  maritime  disaster  Chicago 
Added: 27th April 2017
Views: 989
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ara Parseghian Passes at age 94 Here's a very good tribute to one of college football's great coaches, Ara Parseghian, who died on August 2, 2017 at the age of 94. Parseghian was the head coach of the football programs at Miami of Ohio, Northwestern, and most famously, the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. In fact, Notre Dame, whose team was in the doldrums from 1956 to 1963, hired Parseghian, a non-Catholic of Armenian descent, in 1964 largely because his Northwestern team had beaten Notre Dame four times in a row. Parseghian coached Notre Dame from 1964 to 1974 and compiled a terrific record of 95-17-4. During Parseghian's tenure, Notre Dame was twice voted national champions in the post-season polls.
Tags: Ara  Parseghian  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame 
Added: 8th August 2017
Views: 830
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten Term - College Widow Here's a term that has virtually vanished from the English language: "college widow." Originally it had a very literal meaning. It referred to a youthful widow who sought the company of college men to satisfy her lusty ways. Eventually the term morphed into meaning any older female who 'preyed upon' the willing males at a campus with her irresistible feminine wiles. The term was so common in the 1920s and 1930s that it was the title of both a play and a movie. In the play, a college dean convinces his comely daughter to use her charms to distract a rival school's football team. (What a wonderful example of fatherhood!) Most people today are only familiar with the term from seeing the Marx brothers' 1932 movie Horse Feathers. Few people today realize Horse Feathers is actually a parody of the 1927 silent movie The College Widow. In it Thelma Todd uses her obvious charms to seduce all four Marx brothers as part of a silly plot to steal Huxley College's football plays.
Tags: college  widow  English  term 
Added: 28th October 2017
Views: 1044
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lou Holtz on Tonight Show - 1978 Famed college football coach Lou Holtz, then at the helm of the Arkansas Razorbacks, appears as a guest on Johnny Carson's Tonight show in December 1978. Holtz, famous for his quick wit, even performs a magic trick! Holtz may have been the most loquacious guest ever to appear on The Tonight Show. Johnny could hardly get a word in once Holtz started rolling.
Tags: Lou  Holtz  Tonight  Show  Johnny  Carson  football 
Added: 4th November 2017
Views: 772
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1966 Notre Dame-MSU 10-10 Tie This is a highlight clip of one of the most eagerly anticipated NCAA football games of all time. It occurred late in the 1966 season on November 19 when the undefeated Fighting Irish of Notre Dame traveled to East Lansing, MI to play the undefeated Michigan State Spartans. The attendance at Spartan Stadium was officially listed as 80,011, but it was likely higher. The well played game finished inconclusively in a 10-10 tie. The game ended somewhat controversially. Notre Dame had the ball at is own 30-yard line with 1:24 to play. They converted a fourth-and-one for a first down but then the Irish conservatively ran out to clock on two plays to preserve the tie. The tie ended Michigan State's 1966 schedule, but Notre Dame still had one more game on its slate--a road game the following Saturday at the Los Angeles Coliseum versus Southern California. Notre Dame easily rolled to a 51-0 win over the Trojans and won the 1966 national championship.
Tags: 1966  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame  Michigan  State  10-10  tie 
Added: 10th December 2017
Views: 1046
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] of 11 | Random