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Near Air Disaster - 1983 Gimli Glider Incident A mistake in metric measurement nearly caused a catastrophic airplane disaster over Canadian airspace in the summer of 1983. Known to Canadians as "the Gimli Glider," on Saturday, July 23, 1983, Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767-233 jet, ran out of fuel at an altitude of 41,000 feet. It was about halfway through a flight originating in Montreal en route to Edmonton with a stopover in Ottawa. Although both engines conked out due to lack of fuel, the crew was able to glide the aircraft safely to an emergency landing at Gimli Industrial Park Airport, a former Royal Canadian Air Force base in the small community of Gimli, Manitoba. An investigation later found out the airplane had run out of jet fuel because it had wrongly been fueled in litres rather than imperial gallons. Luckily for the 61 passengers onboard, the flight crew was familiar with glider flying techniques and was able to safely land the huge aircraft. With some difficulty, the airplane touched down on a small runway that had recently been converted from an abandoned military airstrip to to a race track. A race event was underway at the time but was stopped in time to allow the aircraft to land. An official investigation later revealed "company failures and a chain of human errors that combined to defeat built-in safeguards."
Tags: Air  Canada  Gimli  Glider  aviation 
Added: 12th November 2013
Views: 1084
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Posted By: Lava1964
Early Aviation Failures Check out this funny compilation of man's numerous failed attempts to build workable flying machines in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Tags: flight  aviation  failures 
Added: 23rd November 2013
Views: 1247
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Posted By: Lava1964
Failed Nungesser-Coli Flight 1927 Twelve days before Charles Lindbergh's famous first successful trans-Atlantic flight in 1927, two Frenchmen attempted the feat in the reverse direction but tragically vanished. Charles Eugène Jules Marie Nungesser and Francois Coli left Paris’s Le Bourget Airport on May 8, 1927, to fly across the Atlantic non-stop. They hoped to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize offered by a New York City hotelier while confirming France's place atop the postwar aviation world. The two co-pilots had been aviators in the First World War. Nungesser, a fighter pilot, had the third-highest rating for air combat victories amongst French pilots. François Coli was also an ace pilot who commanded a wartime squadron even though he had lost an eye while serving in the French infantry. They set off in the Levasseur PL.8 biplane – a fixed-wing aircraft with two superimposed main wings – named l’Oiseau Blanc (The White Bird) to fly the 3,600 miles from Paris to New York City without halting. The cockpit had been enlarged so that both could fit in. Their task was more difficult than Lindbergh's because they were flying into the wind and thus required more fuel. Their plane carried 11,000 pounds and barely got off the ground. Initial news reports circulated in France that the aviators had safely landed in New York, causing joyous celebrations to erupt in Paris. However, those reports were completely untrue: Nungesser and Coli’s plane disappeared somewhere over the Atlantic. The last verified sighting was when l’Oiseau Blanc was seen near Etretat off the coast of Upper Normandy. The twosome's flight plan would have taken them across southern England, then across Ireland to the Canadian coast and from there down to New York City. There were unverified reports of l’Oiseau Blanc being seen near Ireland and being heard near Newfoundland and the French islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon. Nevertheless, no sign of the airplane has ever been found. Three attempts to find wreckage--the last one occurring in June 2012--have all resulted in nothing.
Tags: aviation  Nungesser  and  Coli 
Added: 24th November 2013
Views: 1068
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Posted By: Lava1964
Naval Squadron Disappears In Bermuda Triangle December 5, 1945 five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers know as Flight 19 disappears over the Bermuda Triangle. Even the rescue plane disappeared.
Tags: Naval  Squadron  Disappears  In  Bermuda  Triangle  BBC  Ft.  Lauderdale  Naval  Air  Station  in  Florida  U.S.  Navy  Avenger  torpedo-bombers  rescue  plane  lost 
Added: 5th December 2014
Views: 1447
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Posted By: Steve
Missing Airplane From 1950 - Northwest Flight 2501 Commercial airliners vanishing are not new. On the night of June 23, 1950, Northwest Orient Airlines flight 2501 departed from New York City en route to its final destination of Seattle with a scheduled stopover in Minneapolis. It never made it to either stop. Sometime around 1:13 a.m. the DC-4 vanished over Lake Michigan near Benton Harbor, MI not long after its captain, Robert Lind, requested permission from air-traffic control to lower its altitude by 1000 meters to avoid stormy conditions. That permission was denied due to heavy air traffic. The airplane should have been spotted on radar near Milwaukee shortly thereafter, but instead it vanished. It was filled to capacity with 55 passengers and a crew of three. Some debris--including small body fragments--washed ashore but the plane itself has never been found, despite sonar-assisted searches and trawlers dragging the lake bottom. Thus no one knows what really happened to it. Researchers in 2008 discovered that the human remains were buried secretly in an unmarked grave without the victims' families being notified. At the time it was the worst airline disaster in American history.
Tags: airplane  aviation  missing  plane  Northwest  2501 
Added: 16th February 2015
Views: 1385
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Rooney as Mr Yunioshi In the 1961 romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany's, Audrey Hepburn played flighty New York City escort Holly Golightly. The relatively small role of her Japanese landlord, Mr. Yunioshi, was strangely played by...Mickey Rooney. Director Blake Edwards instructed Rooney to play Yunioshi as a caricature of an Asian. Accordingly Rooney wore false dentures to give him protruding front teeth. He also spoke in a way that the letter L came out as an R sound. ('Miss Go-right-ry' was how he pronounced the main character's name.) Most of the time Mr. Yunioshi yelled rather than spoke. Based on 21st-century political correctness, Rooney's performance clearly falls within the bounds of bad taste, but as Rooney noted shortly before he died, for the first 40 years after Breakfast at Tiffany's was released, nobody complained. In fact, Rooney claimed that Asian fans of the film always thought his portrayal of Mr. Yunioshi was very amusing.
Tags: Mickey  Rooney  Mr  Yunioshi  Breakfast  at  Tiffanys 
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 1031
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Posted By: Lava1964
1960 Airline Ticket There was no such thing as "ticketless" flights in 1960. You bought an airline ticket that was often filled out by hand--and you were in trouble if you lost it! The one shown here is good for a one-way flight from Chicago to Los Angeles on American Airlines.
Tags: airline  ticket  1960  paper 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1204
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gyro Kite Tags: Gyro  Kite  helicopter  1993  flight  toy  children  kids  wind 
Added: 13th December 2015
Views: 826
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Posted By: Cliffy
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 1350
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Posted By: Lava1964
Petticoat Junction - Steve and Betty Jo First Kiss In honor of Mike Minor who just passed away at age 75--one of the most surprising and favorite Petticoat Junction moments: Steve Elliott and Betty Jo Bradley's first kiss. In Season #4 Steve (Mike Minor) had been added to the PJ cast as a pilot just mustered out of the Air Force who was working as a crop duster. During one of his flights, the red-blooded American male couldn't help but notice the three shapely Bradley sisters swimming in the Hooterville water tank. He quickly decides to reside at the Shady Rest Hotel where he becomes the romantic interest of eldest Bradley girl Billie Jo. However, by Season #5 youngest sister Betty Jo (Linda Kaye) begins to shed her tomboyish ways and becomes a rather fetching lass. The plot of this episode is that farmhand Eb Dawson (from the cast of Green Acres) becomes smitten with the lovely redhead. Betty Jo has no such feelings towards Eb other than friendship, so she asks Steve to pretend to be her boyfriend to dissuade Eb's romantic advances. Watch the clip to see what happens.
Tags: Petticoat  Junction  first  kiss  Steve  Elliott  Betty  Jo  Bradley 
Added: 30th January 2016
Views: 1701
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Posted By: Lava1964

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