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top cat In 1961 came the TV show top cat The central character, Top Cat — called T.C. by close friends — is the leader of a gang of Manhattan alley cats: Fancy Fancy, Spook, Benny the Ball, The Brain, and Choo Choo and the local policeman, Officer Charlie Dibble.
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Added: 11th July 2007
Views: 3936
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Posted By: konifur
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 1668
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Posted By: Lava1964
Babe Ruth in Fancy Curves In 1932 Babe Ruth appeared in a series of short films designed to teach baseball fundamentals and promote the sport. In Fancy Curves, the Babe teaches the finer points of the game to a group of sorority sisters. I'm sure the Babe enjoyed the female companionship of the babes.
Tags: Babe  Ruth  Fancy  Curves 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 2240
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Posted By: Lava1964
Columbo and Erotic Art From the 1978 Columbo episode 'The Conspirators,' the famous homicide detective's investigation leads him to a bookstore where a tome on erotic art catches his fancy. This was the last NBC-produced episode of Columbo.
Tags: Columbo  erotic  art  Conspirators   
Added: 14th March 2009
Views: 2266
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fritz Pollard First Black NFL Coach The first black coach in the National Football League was Fritz Pollard who was a player-coach for the Akron Pros during the league's infancy way back in 1921. Pollard lived to a ripe old age: He was 92 when he died in 1986.
Tags: Fritz  Pollard  NFL  coach 
Added: 10th February 2008
Views: 1157
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dionne Quintuplets The Great Depression did not produce many happy stories, but the birth of the Dionne quintuplets near remote Callander, Ontario, Canada in 1934 was at least outwardly a feel-good news item of the decade. Five identical girls were born to Elzire Dionne on May 28, 1934. They were attended to by a country doctor, Roy Allan Dafoe. Never before had quintuplets survived infancy. The story turned sour when the quints were made wards of the Ontario government because of the financial straits of the Dionne family and other concerns. The provincial government built Quintland, a tourist attraction where the girls were put on public display for the numerous visitors who travelled the Trans-Canada Highway to northern Ontario to see them. Quintland served as a home for the girls who were cared for by nurses, as well as a museum and viewing area for the tourists. Eventually some three million tourists came to Quintland--as many as 6,000 each day at its peak. (There was no admission charge to see the quints, but the region reaped millions of dollars in revenues from hotels, restaurants, etc.) At one point, the quints were Canada's top tourist attraction, surpassing Niagara Falls. The quints were isolated from the outside world and even from their parents and other siblings. The Dionne parents staged years of legal challenges to regain custody of their estranged daughters. They finally succeeded in 1943. The three surviving quints were awarded a large cash settlement in the late 1990s by the Ontario government. Only two of the girls survive today.
Tags: Dionne  quintuplets 
Added: 4th May 2008
Views: 6802
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nancy - Failed Sitcom 1970 This is the opening montage to Nancy, a short-lived sitcom that ran on NBC from September 17, 1970 to January 7, 1971. Here's how Total Television describes it: "Insipid sitcom about the daughter of the President of the United States, who, while vacationing in Iowa, met and married a veterinarian." Renne Jarrett played Nancy Smith. John Fink played Adam Hudson, the vet. Celeste Holm played Abby Townsend, the President's wife's press secretary who also served as Nancy's official chaperone. Despite being featured on a TV Guide cover, Nancy never caught the viewers' fancy. It was yanked after 17 episodes.
Tags: Nancy  sitcom  NBC   
Added: 25th February 2014
Views: 990
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Posted By: Lava1964
Banana-Blade Hockey Sticks The blades on hockey sticks used to be completely straight. In 1927, Cy Denneny of the Ottawa Senators briefly experimented with a blade he had curved using hot water. Nothing came of it. Four decades later, Stan Mikita of the Chicago Blackhawks partially broke the blade of one of his sticks during a practice. He took a shot with it for kicks. Voila! The puck did some fancy dancing through the air much like a knuckleball does. Mikita and teammate Bobby Hull began experimenting with different versions--some with ridiculous curves they dubbed 'banana blades.' Although they had some obvious drawbacks--accurate passing and backhand shots were much more difficult--the warped pieces of wood immediately became formidable weapons. Of course, the banana blades were universally despised by goalies because the netminders had no idea where the puck was headed. (In all honesty, neither did the shooters!) In an era when some goalies didn't wear masks, there was a serious risk of injury, so the extreme blades were outlawed. Today a curve of only 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch is permitted in organized hockey. A hockey ref once told me that if you put a dime on its edge and it fits under the blade of a stick, the curve is illegal.
Tags: hockey  banana  blades 
Added: 29th November 2010
Views: 2757
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple-Graham Greene Lawsuit Before Graham Greene became a famous novelist, he was a freelance writer and critic for several British publications. In 1937, his review of the Shirley Temple movie Wee Willie Winkie in the magazine Night and Day outraged the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Greene basically described the nine-year-old Temple as sexually provocative. Wrote Greene, 'Infancy is [Temple’s] disguise, her appeal is secret and adult with the seductiveness of a [Marlene] Dietrich...Her well-developed rump twists in a tap-dance...She measures a man with agile studio eyes and dimpled depravity. Her admirers-–middle-aged men and clergymen-–respond to her dubious coquetry and well-shaped and desirable little body...Hear the gasp of her antique audience. Some of her popularity seems to rest on an oddly precocious body as voluptuous in grey flannel trousers as Miss Dietrich’s.' 20th Century Fox sued Night and Day on behalf of their star actress and won a judgment of 3,500 British pounds. The lawsuit bankrupted the magazine.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Graham  Greene  lawsuit 
Added: 18th January 2011
Views: 3546
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Posted By: Lava1964
Albertine Lapensee Mystery During the First world War, most of Canada's young able-bodied males enlisted in the military. As a result the quality of men's hockey dropped dramatically. For a short time, women's pro hockey took center stage--and Albertine Lapensee briefly and mysteriously became a superstar. Nicknamed 'the Miracle Maid,' the 26-year-old Lapensee played for her hometown Cornwall (Ontario) Victorias. Her hockey debut came in January 1916 against Ottawa; she scored five of the six goals in Cornwall's victory. Immediately after her debut game, Ottawa players complained that she was really a man. Suspicions and accusations dogged her the rest of her brief career. A week after her debut, Lapensee scored four goals in an 8-0 shutout against the Montreal Westerns before a crowd of about 3,000 fans. At one point the Montreal players yanked off Lapensee's toque to see how long her hair was. (She had braids that fell past her shoulders.) The continuous rumors about Lapensee's gender prompted her hometown newspaper, the Cornwall Standard, to vouch for her. Miss Lapensee, it said, '...played more with her brothers and other boys than with her girlfriends, and this accounts for the masculine style of play she has developed.' Furthermore, 'Scores of people in East Cornwall have known her since her infancy.' Albertine played on, indifferent to the rumours, and the fans didn't seem to mind too much either, as large crowds came to watch her play. In one game she scored 15 goals. When the Victorias agreed to play against the Ottawa Alerts, the Vics' manager had to guarantee Lapensee's appearance by contract. She even behaved like her male counterparts off the ice. She once refused to play until she had been paid, which nearly caused a riot. Although scoring records for the time are incomplete, they indicate Albertine scored about 80 percent of Cornwall's goals in the 1916-1917 season. The next season, Lapensee led her team to an undefeated season. Then, after two spectacular seasons, Albertine Lapensee vanished. There is no record of her playing hockey again--at least as Albertine Lapensee. Family legend says she went to New York in 1918 and had a sex change operation. She/he supposedly married and settled down to run a gas station near Cornwall under the name of Albert Smyth. There are no known photos of Lapensee. Her story is not widely known--not even in Canada.
Tags: hockey  Albertine  Lapensee  controversy  gender 
Added: 24th June 2011
Views: 2394
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Posted By: Lava1964

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