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President Truman Threatens Music Critic President Harry S. Truman had one child--daughter Margaret--who was born in 1924. She began singing locally in choirs in Missouri as a youth. By the late 1940s, when her father was president, she got more noteworthy singing gigs on the radio and in occasional concerts. On December 5, 1950 Margaret performed a program of Schumann, Schubert and Mozart pieces at Constitution Hall in Washington. The Washington Post's music critic, Paul Hume, wrote, "Miss Truman is a unique American phenomenon with a pleasant voice of little size and fair quality. She is extremely attractive on stage. Yet Miss Truman cannot sing very well. She is flat a good deal of the time--more so last night than at any time we have heard her in past years." Upon reading Hume's review, father Harry's paternal instincts kicked in and he went berserk. The president quickly penned a blistering missive to Hume that called him a "frustrated old man who wishes he could have been successful." It concluded with the president bluntly stating, "Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens you'll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below." Hume was astonished by the letter and showed it to his editor who planned to print it in the next issue of the Post. However, the paper's publisher nixed the idea. Nevertheless, Hume told Milton Berliner, the music critic of the Washington News, about HST's threatening letter. The story ran in the rival newspaper and was later widely circulated well beyond the District of Columbia via the wire services.
Tags: Harry  Margaret  Truman  singer  criticism  threat 
Added: 5th July 2015
Views: 1896
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Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Cosell-Alvin Garrett Incident Love him or hate him, Howard Cosell was pretty much the personification of ABC's Monday Night Football from its inception in 1970 through the 1983 season. During the first Monday night game of the 1983 NFL season between the Washington Redskins and the Dallas Cowboys, Howard Cosell made the following comment about diminutive Washington wide receiver Alvin Garrett: "That little monkey sure gets loose, doesn't he?" Immediately Cosell came under fire from a black minister, the Reverend Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Lowery called the remark racist and demanded Cosell apologize or be fired. Cosell was stunned by the allegation. He said the term 'little monkey' was a term of endearment--which he often used to describe his own grandchildren. Indeed, anyone who fairly examined Cosell's body of work knew he had supported black athletes time and time again in truly divisive racial disputes. Jesse Jackson and Muhammad Ali both publicly supported Cosell. Garrett himself said he knew that Cosell meant no harm. Someone even found a clip from a preseason football telecast from 1972 in which Cosell referred to Mike Adamle--a small Caucasian player--as "a little monkey." Nevertheless, Cosell's tenure with Monday night football ended without much fanfare at the end of the 1983 season. He covered the boxing tournament at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and not much else afterward. When Cosell was not assigned to work ABC's coverage of the 1985 World Series, it was obvious that ABC had quietly put the aging Cosell--its iconic broadcaster--out to pasture.
Tags: Howard  Cosell  Alvin  Garrett  racism  incident 
Added: 11th July 2015
Views: 1250
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Posted By: Lava1964
Citroen Ad on Eiffel Tower One of the great architectural marvels ever created was the Eiffel Tower, named for its engineer Gustave Eiffel whose company built it. It was originally supposed to be a temporary structure erected to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the French Republic for the 1889 World's Fair in Paris. Not everyone in 1889 was enamored by it. One French newspaper referred to it as "Mr. Eiffel's monstrosity." When it was completed in 1889 it stood 1,046 feet tall and was the tallest man-made structure in the word--a distinction it held for 40 years when it was eclipsed slightly by the Chrysler Building in New York City. (In 1957 a 17-foot antenna was added to the top of the Tower, making it slightly taller than the Chrysler Building.) For about nine years, from 1925 through 1934, the tower that dominated the Parisian skyline featured tacky advertising for Citroen automobiles. Thankfully it hasn't been marred by such commercialism in more than 80 years.
Tags: Eiffel  Tower  Citroen  advertising 
Added: 14th July 2015
Views: 1000
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Joe Theismann Injury - 1985 Definitely not for the faint of heart: Washington Redskins' quarterback Joe Theismann's famous career-ending leg injury. It occurred during a Monday Night Football telecast on November 18, 1985 when a trick play went awry and two New York Giants (Harry Carson and Lawrence Taylor) tackled him in the backfield. Described medically as a "comminuted compound fracture," the play was voted by ESPN viewers as the most memorable injury of all time. (By the way, "comminuted" means "pulverized"--which is a fairly accurate description of the horrible injury.) Theismann, age 36, never played another down in the NFL. His right leg never healed quite properly; it's slightly shorter than his left leg. Frank Gifford, O.J. Simpson and Fran Tarkenton were in the ABC broadcast booth that night.
Tags: NFL  Joe  Theismann  injury  broken  leg 
Added: 13th September 2015
Views: 1418
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Partially Completed Eiffel Tower - 1888 The Eiffel Tower, the famous Parisian landmark, was fully completed by 1889--in time for that year's World's Fair and to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution. Here's what the tower looked like in 1888 when only the base of the tourist attraction had been completed. (The completed tower stands 324 meters in height--the equivalent of an 81-story skyscraper.)
Tags: Eiffel  Tower  Paris  construction 
Added: 14th February 2016
Views: 1042
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 784
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fair Exchange - Failed Sitcom In September 1962 CBS unveiled something new--an hour-long sitcom titled Fair Exchange. Its premise was that an American family and a British family swapped teenage daughters for a year. Why? The two families' patriarchs had been Second World War flying buddies. The American daughter, Patty Walker, wanted to study in London, so the two families, in effect, arranged their own version of an exchange student program. (Judy Carne played the English teen, Heather Finch. It was her first American television role. Even though she played a teenager, Carne was 23 years old at the time.) The episodes generally focused on the difficulties each girl had adopting to the cultural differences of her new location. Filmed in both England and Hollywood, the 60-minute format proved too unwieldy and the show was canceled in December 1962. Three months later, after loyal fans put pressure on CBS, the network returned Fair Exchange to its schedule--but only in a revised half-hour format. Ratings did not merit the show continuing beyond one season, however. Fair Exchange was again cancelled before the 1963-64 TV season began after 27 episodes. Here is the opening montage for the 60-minute version.
Tags: Fair  Exchange  sitcom  Judy  Carne  CBS 
Added: 26th April 2018
Views: 725
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Posted By: Lava1964
Julie Andrews on Dick Cavett Show Here's a gem: From a 1971 episode of The Dick Cavett Show, Julie Andrews is persuaded to sing Wouldn't It Be Loverly? from My Fair Lady.
Tags: Julie  Andrews  My  Fair  Lady  Dick  Cavett 
Added: 31st August 2019
Views: 647
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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