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Brian Bonsall Mug Shot Believe it or not, this is a mug shot of Brian Bonsall. Bonsall played Andy Keaton, the youngest member of the Keaton clan, on the popular 1980s sitcom Family Ties. After the show ended, Bonsall got involved with several punk rock bands in Colorado and Los Angeles. He has experienced ongoing difficulties with alcohol. He was arrested on domestic violence charges after assaulting his girlfriend. He pleaded guilty to third-degree assault and was paroled, but he repeatedly violated the conditions and failed to appear in court. He is currently a fugitive.
Tags: Brian  Bonsall  Family  Ties  mug  shot 
Added: 21st October 2009
Views: 3531
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Posted By: Lava1964
Georgia Tech Beats Cumberland 222-0 The worst rout in the history of American college football was administered by mighty Georgia Tech against tiny Cumberland College on October 7, 1916. The final score was 222-0. There were some extenuating circumstances. Cumberland had signed a contract a year in advance to play Georgia Tech in Atlanta in 1916, but discontinued its football program after the 1915 season. However, the contract with Tech included a hefty $3,000 forfeit penalty if Cumberland failed to put a team on the field against Tech. Instead of paying the fine, Cumberland threw together a team on short notice. The team never held a single practise. One player, a law student, recalled years later, 'We put a lot of faith in the clause about placing a team on the field. There was nothing in the contract requiring us to play well.' Tech coach John Heisman showed no mercy. His squad scored nine touchdowns in both the first and second quarters to lead 126-0 at halftime. Tech agreed to shorten the third and fourth quarters and only scored 14 more touchdowns. In all, Tech scored 32 touchdowns (and 30 conversions). Tech also amassed 1,650 yards rushing on just 40 attempts. Cumberland's rushing total was -96 yards. They did complete two passes, though. Tech did not attempt a pass all game. Most interesting stat: There were no first downs by either team. All of Tech's big plays went for touchdowns. Cumberland's biggest play was a 10-yard pass completion on a fourth-and-28 situation. Despite their historic defeat, the Cumberland players returned to their Lebanon, TN campus as heroes for saving their small school $3,000.
Tags: college  football  Georgia  Tech  Cumberland 
Added: 28th October 2009
Views: 3455
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Posted By: Lava1964
1950 World Series - Yankees vs Phillies The 2009 World Series was a rematch of the 1950 World Series. That year the New York Yankees swept the Philadelphia Phillies in four straight games. The 1950 Phillies managed just five runs in the entire series. Some trivia from that one-sided Fall Classic: The Phillies failed to hit a home run. No other team since then has gone an entire World Series without hitting a home run. There were no black players on either team, making it the last all-white World Series.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  Phillies  Yankees 
Added: 28th October 2009
Views: 1130
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oral Roberts Fund-Raising Controversy 1987 Popular evangelist Oral Roberts made headlines during a televised fund-raiser in January 1987. Roberts announced that if his current fund-raising campaign failed to reach its $8-million goal by March that 'God would call him home.' It was unclear whether the 69-year-old preacher meant that he would commit suicide or if God would take his life. Roberts (shown here in a photo taken seven months before his death in 2009) was widely mocked for his tactics. An atheist group encouraged people to withhold donations 'to see what happens.' Despite the adverse publicity, Roberts' 1987 fund-raiser netted $9.1 million in donations.
Tags: Oral  Roberts  fund-raiser  controversy 
Added: 16th December 2009
Views: 1364
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Posted By: Lava1964
Life With Lucy - 1986 Lucille Ball had 23 years of successful sitcoms from 1951 through 1974. During the next dozen years, Ball appeared only in specials and did the occasional game show. In 1986, after some serious negotiating, ABC persuaded the 75-year-old Ball to come out of retirement and do another sitcom, Life With Lucy, alongside 80-year-old Gale Gordon. Lucy would be paid for 22 episodes even if the series was cancelled before they aired or were even made. She also insisted that Bob Carroll and Madelyn Pugh--her two primary writers from I Love Lucy--would have final script approval. Lucy played a widow who moves in her with daughter's family. The first episode aired on Saturday, September 23, 1986. It ranked 23rd for the week. The reviews were not kind. Critics felt the scripts were old-fashioned and predictable. Some Lucy fans cringed watching the elderly Lucy and Gale perform stunts they did years earlier. Lucy’s timing was a bit off as well because she now needed cue cards to remember her lines. As the weeks went on, Life With Lucy steadily fell in the ratings. Within two months, it was among the lowest-rated shows on television. Lucy was shocked because she had never failed in a series before. There were occasional bright spots, though: Lucille Ball was likely at her personal best in an episode featuring John Ritter. (Each was a huge fan of the other.) An episode titled 'Mother of the Bride,' in which Audrey Meadows (of The Honeymooners) appeared as Lucy's sister, probably was the best of the bunch. Unfortunately, nothing could save what was becoming a major disappointment for ABC. Even though 13 episodes were filmed, only eight made it to the airwaves before the series was axed. 'Mother of the Bride' was the last one to air on November 15, 1986. Lucy was apparently devastated by the show's cancellation, tearfully declaring to longtime friend Ann Sothern that TV viewers only accepted a younger Lucy--not Lucy as a grandmother. ABC never aired any reruns. Life With Lucy has not yet been made available on DVD.
Tags: Life  With  Lucy  Sitcom 
Added: 21st March 2010
Views: 1783
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Adding Machine 1905 Adding machines have been around for more than a century, but the old-fashioned 'crank' models had pretty much disappeared from offices by the late 1980s. William S. Burroughs (1855-1898) invented an adding and listing machine with a full keyboard in the early 1880s. He submitted a patent application in 1885, co-founded the American Arithmometer Co. in 1886 to produce the machine, and received a patent for his invention in 1888. After its Bankers' and Merchants' Registering Accountant machine failed in trials in 1890, the American Arithmometer Co. marketed its improved Burroughs Registering Accountant in 1892 for $475. In 1905, the company was renamed the Burroughs Adding Machine Co. In 1894, an article in a bankers' publication-- clearly referring to the Burroughs Registering Accountant--reported that 'An ingenious adding machine, recently introduced in Providence banks, is said to be infallible in results, and to do the work of two or three active clerks. Inclosed in a frame with heavy plate-glass panels, through which the working of the mechanism can be seen, the machine occupies a space of 11 by 15 inches and is nine inches high. On an inclined keyboard are 81 keys, arranged in nine rows of nine keys each. The printing is done through an inked ribbon.' Shown here is a Burroughs model from 1905. A seat is provided for the user! How quaint!
Tags: adding  machine 
Added: 22nd June 2010
Views: 1711
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 3722
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2033
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Knute Rockne Plane Crash Famed Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne and seven other men perished in an airplane crash on March 31, 1931. Rockne, 43, was travelling on business from Kansas City to Los Angeles on TWA Flight 599. The plane had only been airborne a short time when it lost a wing. It crashed on a farm near Bazaar, KS. Apparently the passengers were aware of their fate: It was reported that when Rockne's body was found, he was clutching a rosary. This memorial, erected on the crash site, was maintained for years by the 13-year-old boy who arrived first on the scene. Rockne's funeral cortege was witnessed by an estimated 300,000 people. It is often claimed that Flight 599 went down in or shortly after a thunderstorm. However, meteorological records show that there was no significant convective activity at the time. The accident was actually caused by the composition of the aircraft. Fokker Trimotor aircrafts were manufactured out of wood laminate; in this instance, moisture had leaked into the interior of one wing over a period of time and had weakened the glue bonding the structural members (called struts or spars) that prevented the wing from fluttering in flight. One spar finally failed; the wing developed an uncontrolled flutter and separated from the aircraft. The accident caused numerous changes in the operations of both TWA and the Aeronautics Branch of the US Department of Commerce, forerunner of today's FAA. All US airlines operating at that time were forced to remove Fokker Trimotors from service. The expense of this compounded with the bad publicity associated with Rockne's death almost sank TWA. The intense public interest in the cause of the accident also forced the Department of Commerce to abandon its policy of keeping the results of aircraft accident investigations secret.
Tags: Knute  Rockne  memorial  airplane  crash  football 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 6435
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
North American Soccer League The North American Soccer League was supposed to be the 'next big thing' in sports. It lasted 17 seasons but it failed to dislodge the traditional team sports from their longtime perch as fan favorites. The league began in 1968 with the merger of two small pro leagues and lasted until 1984. At the peak of the NASL's popularity in the late 1970s, it had 24 teams. The New York Cosmos (who featured Pele and Franz Beckenbauer on their roster) sometimes drew 70,000 fans to Giants Stadium. However, the league average never exceeded 15,000 fans per game and some teams struggled to draw 5,000. By its last season, the NASL had dwindled to nine teams. By the time the final NASL game was played between the Chicago Sting and Toronto Blizzard, only three teams were solvent. To Europeans, the NASL was perceived as soccer's version of an elephants' graveyard where players long past their primes could extend their careers for sizable money. The Euro stars, despite their diminishing skills, accounted for large chunks of teams' payrolls that could have been better spent fostering North American talent. Traditionalists were also put off by the NASL's gimmicks to Americanize the sport: a liberalized offside rule, game clocks that counted downward instead of upward, penalty shootouts to break ties, and a crazy points system that rewarded goals scored as well as wins. In the end, the NASL managed to alienate traditional soccer fans while failing to attract new ones.
Tags: NASL  soccer 
Added: 12th April 2011
Views: 948
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Posted By: Lava1964

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