Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Marion Parker Murder - 1927 Fair warning: This story is unsettling. One of the most brutal crimes in American history was the kidnapping and murder of 12-year-old schoolgirl Marion Parker. On Thursday, December 15, 1927 a young man appeared at Mount Vernon Junior High School in Los Angeles claiming to be an associate of Perry Parker, a prominent local banker. The man coolly told the school's registrar that the banker had been seriously injured in a car accident and had requested to speak to his daughter. There were actually twin Parker sisters enrolled in the school--Marion and Marjorie. By chance the registrar fetched Marion who rode off with the man. He was later identified as 19-year-old William Edward Hickman. The Parker family became alarmed when Marion did not return from school. Shortly thereafter they received a ransom note and phone calls from the kidnapper asking for $1500 in gold certificates in exchange for Marion's safe return. One attempt by Marion's father to pay the ransom was thwarted when Hickman spotted police detectives lurking nearby. Another meeting time was secretly arranged by Hickman and Marion's father on December 17 where the money was given to a man in a parked car. Perry Parker saw his daughter wrapped in a blanket slumped in the back seat with her eyes open. At gunpoint the ransom was paid and the driver pushed the girl onto the street and drove away. Marion's father was horrified to find that his daughter was dead. Her eyelids had been sewn open to give the illusion that she was alive. Worse, her head had been severed, her arms and legs had been cut off and she had been disemboweled. (The missing limbs were found the next day in a city park.) The ghastly crime spawned the largest manhunt in southern California's history, one that included 20,000 volunteers. A reward of $100,000 was offered for the capture of the culprit. Several clues, including the discovery of the stolen car used on the night of the money exchange, led to Hickman being named as the key suspect. He was eventually arrested in Echo, OR after spending some of the gold certificates there. Hickman had been a former employee at Parker's bank and had been fired for embezzlement in a forged check scam. He served prison time for the crime. The fingerprint records from the embezzlement charge were used to match those found on the stolen car from the kidnapping. Hickman willingly told police in graphic detail that he had decided to kill Marion because she had discovered his name. She had only been dead about 12 hours before the money exchange. Hickman said he had choked her with a towel to make her unconscious and then began his dismemberment while she was still alive. Hickman--who said he intended to use the $1500 to pay his tuition to attend a bible college!--hoped to avoid the gallows by claiming insanity. He was one of the first defendants in California to try that ploy after it had become an acceptable legal defense. It failed when a fellow prisoner claimed Hickman had asked his advice on how to appear crazy. A jury rejected Hickman's insanity defense in February 1928. Hickman was executed at San Quentin Prison eight months later on October 19. His hand-written confession is on display at the Los Angeles Police Museum. Marion Parker's ghost is said to occupy her former house.
Tags: Marion  Parker  murder  kidnapping  1927 
Added: 13th April 2015
Views: 1246
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Checking In - Sitcom Flop 1981 The Jeffersons was a hugely successful spinoff from All in the Family, running for 10 seasons from 1975 to 1985. It also inspired a not-so-successful spinoff: Checking In. On The Jeffersons, Marla Gibbs played Florence Johnston, the sassy, wisecracking maid who regularly exchanged insults with George Jefferson. Her character was so well liked by viewers that CBS figured it would be a smart move to give Gibbs her own series. Accordingly, in episode #154 and #155 of The Jeffersons, a hotel manager was so impressed by Florence that he offered her the job as supervisor of maids at his St. Frederick Hotel. Florence accepted and Checking In was born. It premiered on Thursday, April 9, 1981. Larry Linville (Major Frank Burns from MASH fame) played Lyle Block, the hotel's weasly manager and, naturally, Florence's nemesis. After four weeks, though, Checking In was floundering in the ratings and CBS pulled the plug after the April 30 episode. Smartly, the network had Gibbs return to the Jeffersons' household as their maid. In her return episode, #161, Florence arrives at the Jeffersons' door explaining that the hotel burned down! (Her clothing and hair had traces of soot and fire damage to add credibility to the plot twist!) She had to compete with new maid Carmen to get her old job back. After missing just five shows, Gibbs' Florence character remained on The Jeffersons until the series ended in 1985. Marla Gibbs was nominated for an Emmy as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Emmy in for five stright years (1981 through 1985) for her role as Florence Johnston. Gibbs' career accomplishments are even more impressive when one considers she was married at age 13 and had three children by age 20! She still managed to graduate from Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago. A performer in amateur theatricals, Gibbs was working as a customer service agent for United Airlines when she got her role on The Jeffersons. Cautiously, she waited until The Jeffersons was a bonafide hit show before quitting her job at United!
Tags: Marla  Gibbs  checking  In  Jeffersons  sitcom 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 2069
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 1103
Rating:
Posted By: Admin
Curious Death of Thelma Todd Thelma Todd was a pretty blonde Hollywood actress who got her start in movies after she won some beauty contests in Massachusetts. Todd appeared in about 120 movies from 1926 through 1935. On the morning of Monday, December 16, 1935, the 29-year-old Todd was found dead in her car inside a garage belonging to Jewel Carmen, a former actress. Carmen was the former wife of Todd's lover and business partner Roland West. An autopsy determined Todd's death to have been caused by carbon monoxide poisoning. Todd had a wide circle of friends as well as a busy social life. A subsequent police investigation revealed that Todd had spent the last night of her life at the Trocadero, a popular Hollywood restaurant, at a party hosted by entertainer Stanley Lupino and Ida, his actress daughter. At the restaurant, Todd had a brief, unpleasant exchange with her ex-husband, Pat DeCicco. However, her friends stated that she was in good spirits, and were unaware of anything in her life that could suggest a reason for suicide. Nevertheless, suicide was the verdict of a Grand Jury. LAPD detectives first concluded that Todd's death was accidental, the result of her either warming up the car to drive it or using the heater to keep herself warm. Other evidence, however, points to foul play. Some Hollywood buffs believe Todd was the target of extortion and was killed fo refusing to pay. It is also possible that she was locked in the garage by her assailant after she started the car. Blood from a wound was found on her face and dress, leading some to the conclusion she was knocked unconscious and placed in the car to succumb to carbon monoxide poisoning. Todd's body was cremated, thus no further autopsies could be performed. Her death certificate states the cause of death as accidental carbon monoxide poisoning.
Tags: Thelma  Todd  Hollywood  actress  death  suspicious 
Added: 1st February 2011
Views: 2699
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1315
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Maudie Hopkins - Last Civil War Widow Maudie Hopkins (December 7, 1914 – August 17, 2008) was an American woman believed to be the last known surviving widow of a Civil War veteran. Born Maudie Cecilia Acklin in Baxter County, Arkansas, she married William M. Cantrell (aged 86) on February 2, 1934, when she was 19. Cantrell had enlisted in the Confederate States Army at age 16 in Pikeville, Kentucky, and served in General Samuel G. French's Battalion of the Virginia Infantry. He was captured in 1863 and was later part of a prisoner exchange. He had had a previous wife, who died in 1929. Cantrell supported Maudie with a Confederate pension of $25 every two or three months. She inherited his home upon his death in 1937 but received no further pension benefits. She remarried later in 1937, and twice thereafter, and had three children. It was not especially uncommon for young women in Arkansas to marry Confederate pensioners for purely financial reasons. In fact, it became something akin to a career choice. To curtail these sham marriages, in 1937 the state passed a law stating that women who married Civil War veterans would not be eligible for widows' pensions. (The law was later amended in 1939 to state that only widows born after 1870 were ineligible for pensions.) Hopkins generally kept her first marriage a secret, fearing the resulting gossip from marrying a much older man would damage her reputation. After researching records from Arkansas and United States Census Bureau data, Hopkins was certified as the last Civil War widow by various historical organizations, most notably the United Daughters of the Confederacy. A spokeswoman for the UDC, Martha Boltz, said at the time that there may be two other unverified widows, one in Tennessee and another in North Carolina, but if they were still alive, they had chosen to remain in anonymity. Hopkins, show here in a photo from 2004, died on August 17, 2008 in a nursing home in Lexa, Arkansas, aged 93.
Tags: widow  Civil  War  Maudie  Hopkins 
Added: 23rd November 2011
Views: 2869
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3306
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
ESPN Reveals 1973 King-Riggs Match was Fixed Confirming many people's suspicions that have lingered for 40 years, an expose on ESPN.com this week showed strong evidence that Bobby Riggs deliberately lost his famous Battle of the Sexes tennis match to Billie Jean King as a way to erase his gambling debts with organized crime. The 55-year-old Riggs had throttled Margaret Court, the world's top female tennis player, in a televised match on Mother's Day 1973 6-2, 6-1. Four months later King, the defending Wimbledon champion, beat Riggs in surprisingly easy fashion 6-4, 6-3, 6-3 before a big TV audience and more than 30,000 fans at the Houston Astrodome--despite being a 5-2 underdog at Las Vegas sports books. When one views the Riggs-King match with a critical eye, Riggs played passively and listlessly--not remotely the same way he played against Court in May. Riggs' shots were soft and usually placed directly at King. Riggs, the 1939 men's Wimbledon champion, whose serve was impeccably accurate, also double-faulted at four critical points in the match--including set point in the first set. Several all-time male tennis legends, including Don Budge who achieved the Grand Slam in 1938, expressed doubts about the honesty of the match, but their doubts were dismissed as wounded male pride at the time. According to the ESPN story, Riggs was anywhere from $100,000 to $500,000 in debt to the mob. A witness, now 79, who was close to the mob, told ESPN he had overheard the discussions regarding the fix. Riggs came up with a two-part plan: In exchange for having his gambling debts expunged, Riggs would goad Court into a TV match with sexist comments knowing full well he could beat her soundly. He would then purposely lose to King as a way for the mob to make a killing in wagers on King at long odds. Riggs died in 1995 at age 77. King was among the last people to speak to him.
Tags: tennis  Bobby  Riggs  Billie  Jean  King  fix 
Added: 28th August 2013
Views: 1021
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Thorny Thornberry The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet ran for 435 episodes over an amazing 14 seasons on ABC from 1952 to 1966--a record for a non-animated sitcom that still stands today. From 1952 to 1957 Don DeFore played the Nelsons' good-natured next-door neighbor "Thorny" Thornberry in 96 episodes. (Whatever Thorny's real first name was, it was never mentioned). Thorny often exchanged playful barbs with Ozzie Nelson and gave him ill-timed advice. Sometimes he got caught up in whatever amusing complications befell the Nelson patriarch and his family. DeFore was nominated for an Emmy for Best Supporting Actor in 1955 and was generally a popular part of the program. However, the show began to focus on different neighbors in the late 1950s (primarily Joe and Mary Jane Randolph and Doc Williams). Thorny, despite his popularity, just vanished without any explanation. DeFore later had a starring role in the 1960s sitcom Hazel in which he played Hazel's employer George Baxter.
Tags: Thorny  Thornberry  Ozzie  and  Harriet  neighbor 
Added: 14th November 2014
Views: 3631
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
William Frawley-Vivian Vance Feud As any good sitcom fan knows, from 1951 to 1960 William Frawley and Vivian Vance played Fred and Ethel and Mertz--Lucy and Ricky Ricardo's landlords and best friends on I Love Lucy and the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour. Frawley and Vance performed comedy magic on the set, but they truly detested each other. Problems began on the first day of shooting when Vance commented that no one would believe her character would be married to 'that old coot.' (Vance, who was 42 in 1951, was 22 years younger than Frawley.) Frawley overheard the remark and never forgave Vance for that barb. Often when Vance suggested even the smallest change in dialogue in the script, Frawley would storm off the set--solely because it was Vance who made the suggestion. Long before I Love Lucy began, Frawley had a reputation for being a difficult actor to work with due to his mercurial temperament and love of the bottle. Perhaps his hatred of Vance gave the exchanges between the two co-stars some extra zing. When The Lucy Desi-Comedy Hour ended, CBS proffered the idea of Vance and Frawley co-starring in a spinoff titled Fred and Ethel. Apparently Frawley liked the idea because of the potential money in it, but Vance swiftly quashed the idea, saying she wanted nothing to do with Frawley ever again. Frawley's next TV role was Bub O'Casey on My Three Sons. Tim Considine, who played eldest son Mike Douglas, recalled Frawley exploding into profanity-laced rages whenever someone innocently asked him about Vance. Considine further recalled that Frawley would occasionally disrupt the shooting of The Lucy Show by tossing noisy objects near the sound stage if Vance was trying to do a scene. Frawley suddenly died of a heart attack in 1966. Upon hearing the news, Vance reputedly shouted, 'Champagne for everyone!'
Tags: Vivian  Vance  William  Frawley  feud 
Added: 24th June 2015
Views: 2934
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 [2] 3 of 3 | Random