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Lucy Show Shower Scene In this famous clip from a 1962 episode of The Lucy Show, Lucy and Viv attempt to install a shower. Water starts pouring in, the drain is plugged, and the inevitable happens.
Tags: Lucy  Show   
Added: 25th November 2007
Views: 1655
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Posted By: Lava1964
Canadians at Hong Kong 1941 This is the tail end of an excellent Canadian documentary about the defense of Hong Kong in 1941. In December 1941, some 2,000 green Canadian troops were sent to bolster the exotic British outpost against an expected Japanese attack. It was a suicide mission. The Japanese attacked with about 90,000 battle-hardened troops. The heroic defense of Hong Kong lasted about three weeks before the inevitable surrender. Japanese troops brutally murdered wounded hospitalized defenders. Captured Canadian and British troops were shipped to slave labor camps where they existed in horrid conditions for nearly four years. Lest we forget...
Tags: Hong  Kong  Canadians 
Added: 8th May 2008
Views: 1482
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Posted By: Lava1964
Country Superstar Eddy Arnold dies at 89 Eddy Arnold, whose mellow baritone on songs like 'Make the World Go Away', made him one of the most successful country singers in history, died this morning May 6,2008, days short of his 90th birthday. Arnold died at a care facility near Nashville. His wife of 66 years, Sally, had died in March, and in the same month, Arnold fell outside his home, injuring his hip. Arnold's vocals on songs like the 1965 "Make the World Go Away," one of his many No. 1 country hits and a top 10 hit on the pop charts, made him one of the most successful country singers in history. Folksy yet sophisticated, he became a pioneer of "The Nashville Sound," also called "countrypolitan," a mixture of country and pop styles. His crossover success paved the way for later singers such as Kenny Rogers. "I sing a little country, I sing a little pop and I sing a little folk, and it all goes together," he said in 1970. He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1966. The following year he was the first person to receive the entertainer of the year award from the Country Music Association. The reference book "Top Country Singles 1944-1993," ranked Arnold the No. 1 country singer in terms of overall success on the Billboard country charts. It lists his first No. 1 hit as "It's a Sin," 1947, and for the following year ranks his "Bouquet of Roses" as the biggest hit of the entire year. Other hits included "Cattle Call,""The Last Word in Lonesome Is Me,""Anytime,""Bouquet of Roses,""What's He Doing in My World?""I Want to Go With You,""Somebody Like Me,""Lonely Again" and "Turn the World Around." Most of his hits were done in association with famed guitarist Chet Atkins, the producer on most of the recording sessions. The late Dinah Shore once described his voice as like "warm butter and syrup being poured over wonderful buttermilk pancakes." Reflecting on his career, he said he never copied anyone. 'I really had an idea about how I wanted to sing from the very beginning,' he said. He revitalized his career in the 1960s by adding strings, a controversial move for a country artist back then. 'I got to thinking, if I just took the same kind of songs I'd been singing and added violins to them, I'd have a new sound. They cussed me, but the disc jockeys grabbed it. ... The artists began to say, 'Aww, he's left us.' Then within a year, they were doing it!' Arnold was born May 15, 1918, on a farm near Henderson, Tenn., the son of a sharecropper. He sang on radio stations in Jackson, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., and St. Louis before becoming nationally known. His image was always that of a modest, clean-cut country boy. 'You cannot satisfy all the people,' he once said. 'They have an image of me. Some people think I'm Billy Graham's half brother, but I'm not. I want people to get this hero thing off their mind and just let me be me.'
Tags: eddy  arnold  countrypolitan  sound   
Added: 8th May 2008
Views: 1676
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Posted By: Naomi
Dont cry for me Argentina The Carpenters Tags: The  Carpenters  Argentina  Passages  1977  Evita  Peron   
Added: 17th August 2008
Views: 1255
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Posted By: ediegold62
United States Football League Sports history has shown that it is very difficult for nascent pro sports leagues to challenge old, established ones. Nevertheless, there are entrepreneurs always willing to try. From 1983 through 1985 the United States Football League existed as a spring/summer league. The USFL was the brainchild of David Dixon, a New Orleans antique dealer. In 1980, Dixon commissioned a study by Frank Magid Associates that found promising results for a spring and summer football league. He'd also formed a blueprint for the prospective league's operations, which included early television exposure, heavy promotion in home markets, and owners willing to absorb years of losses—-which he felt would be inevitable until the league found its feet. The USFL secured television contracts from both ABC and ESPN. The league also was able to sign several collegiate stars--most notably Herschel Walker who was still an underclassman. Mostly, however, the public responded with yawns. Television ratings and overall attendance were below expectations. Teams often spent far more than the proposed $1.8 million salary cap to land big-name players. In three seasons, 23 different teams played under the USFL banner. The Breakers were a typical USFL franchise, operating in three different cities (Boston, New Orleans, and Portland) over the three years. Teams typically wallowed in debt. The San Antonio Gunslingers were in such dire straits that some players, whose pay checks had bounced, were exchanging their complimentary game tickets for food and were boarding at the homes of sympathetic fans. The USFL was dealt its death blow in a courtroom in 1986 when it won an antitrust lawsuit versus the National Football League--but the jury awarded the USFL only $3 in damages. Still, some USFL innovations were evenutally adopted by the NFL. These included the two-point conversion, the use of instant replay to assist officials, and a salary cap.
Tags: USFL  football 
Added: 21st November 2009
Views: 1356
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1951
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ray Combs The original ABC version of Family Feud was hosted by Richard Dawson from 1976 through 1985. Three years later the game show returned to the air on CBS (and then syndication) with Ray Combs as its host. Combs was originally a comedian who was successful as a warm-up act for studio audiences at TV tapings. His favorable reputation once got him a stand-up gig on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. When Family Feud was resurrected, Combs was inevitably compared to Richard Dawson--usually unfavorably. When Mark Goodson, Family Feud's creator, died in 1993, his son took control of the show. With ratings noticeably falling, it was announced that Combs would be replaced by old favorite Richard Dawson in 1994. At the end of the final Family Feud that Combs hosted, he left the stage immediately after he said goodbye--instead of mingling with the competing families, as was the custom. Combs never recovered from losing the show. A car accident caused a spinal injury that put him in constant pain. The comedy clubs he owned closed; he suffered major financial losses and lost his home. His wife of 18 years left him. Displying suicidal tendencies, Combs was hospitalized shortly after his 40th birthday. Not long after his release, police were called to Combs' home which he was violently trashing. He was taken to a mental institution. A short time later Combs committed suicide by hanging himself with his bed linen. In a weird coincidence, Richard Dawson died 16 years to the day that Ray Combs did.
Tags: Ray  Combs  suicide  game  show  host 
Added: 24th July 2010
Views: 6486
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Posted By: Lava1964
1974 Time Magazine Global Cooling Story Although Richard Nixon was featured on the cover of the June 24, 1974 issue of Time magazine, from a historian's point of view the most interesting article within that edition was a doom-and-gloom story about the inevitable onset of global cooling. Yep, global cooling--not global warming. The article said, 'Telltale signs are everywhere — from the unexpected persistence and thickness of pack ice in the waters around Iceland to the southward migration of a warmth-loving creature like the armadillo from the Midwest. Since the 1940s the mean global temperature has dropped about 2.7° F. Although that figure is at best an estimate, it is supported by other convincing data. When climatologist George J. Kukla of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and his wife Helena analyzed satellite weather data for the Northern Hemisphere, they found that the area of the ice and snow cover had suddenly increased by 12% in 1971 and the increase has persisted ever since. Areas of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic, for example, were once totally free of any snow in summer; now they are covered year round.' Hmm.
Tags: global  cooling  Time  magazine 
Added: 5th February 2011
Views: 8056
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Posted By: Lava1964
AfterMASH TV networks can't leave well enough alone. In February 1983, MASH exited the airwaves in a blaze of glory after 11 successful and brilliant seasons of quality television. Seven months later, CBS reunited a few of its characters in a sequel titled AfterMASH. (The title was intended to be a pun on "aftermath".) The show was set immediately following the end of the Korean War and chronicled the adventures of three characters from the original series: Colonel Potter (played by Harry Morgan), Klinger (Jamie Farr) and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher). By several quirks of fate, all three end up working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri. Rosalind Chao rounded out the starring cast as Soon-Lee Klinger, a Korean refugee whom Klinger met in the last two episodes of MASH and married at the end of the series. AfterMASH premiered on September 26, 1983 in the same Monday night 9:00 p.m. EST. time slot that MASH once had. Curious and faithful MASH fans provided vast audience numbers for that first broadcast. AfterMASH debuted at #1 in the weekly TV ratings--the first time a new show had done that since Laverne and Shirley. It finished 10th out of all network shows for the 1983-1984 season according to Nielsen Media Research television ratings. For its second season CBS disastrously moved the show to Tuesday nights at 8:00 p.m. EST., opposite NBC's top-ten hit The A-Team. CBS launched an optimistic marketing campaign featuring illustrations by Sanford Kossin of Max Klinger in a nurse's uniform, shaving off Mr. T's signature mohawk, theorizing AfterMASH would take a large portion of The A-Team's audience. The exact opposite occurred: AfterMASH's ratings plummeted to near the bottom of the television rankings and the show was canceled just nine episodes into its second season. Twenty-nine AfterMASH episodes had aired, one was shown as late as May 1985. A thirtieth episode was completed but was never broadcast. Comparisons to the original MASH were inevitable and largely unfavorable. In 2002, TV Guide listed AfterMASH, perhaps uncharitably, as the seventh-worst TV series ever.
Tags: TV  AfterMASH  sequel 
Added: 19th June 2012
Views: 1913
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nevada Mid-Air Crash - 1958 It's is hard to imagine today, but as late as 1958 civilian air traffic control in the United States operated independently from military air traffic control with neither group thinking it was absolutely necessary to share information with the other. The result was inevitable: On April 21, 1958, a military training plane collided with a civilian DC-7 passenger airliner just outside of Las Vegas, killing all 49 people on both aircraft. The passenger plane, United Airlines flight 736, was traveling from Los Angeles to New York and was headed to a scheduled stopover in Denver. An investigation later showed that the training plane went into a planned dive and clipped its right wing into the passenger plane's right wing. Both planes plummeted violently to the ground within seconds into an area of desert. The end result was that the FAA was henceforth given full authority to monitor all air traffic to prevent future calamities. It is still the worst air disaster ever to occur in Nevada.
Tags: 1958  mid-air  collision  Nevada 
Added: 10th December 2014
Views: 1252
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Posted By: Lava1964

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